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CSRE 1V: A History of Race

This course will survey the idea of race and its history. We will focus our attention on the construction of the idea of race, and we will trace the ways in which this concept has changed over time. The course will start with a panel discussion on definitions of race in history, and as presented in different academic disciplines today. This discussion will be followed by two lectures tracing histories of race from Antiquity until the twentieth century. The last session will be a roundtable on the continuing role of race in the United States today. Covered topics will include explicit and implicit bias, institutionalized racism, race and criminal justice, equal justice initiatives and protests, racial stratification. The roles of politics, economics, science, religion, and nationalism, as well as the relationships between race, gender, and class will also be discussed. Course must be taken for 3 units to count toward WAYS requirement. This course will meet 5 times, starting MONDAY January 14th, and ending the last day of class Monday, February 25th.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lamotte, M. (PI)

CSRE 11SI: Leadership at Stanford

This class will explore the role of student government, decision-making and advocacy in a major research university setting such as Stanford. Designed to prepare new student leaders for their legislative responsibilities, the class will incorporate presentations from university stakeholders along with experiential learning exercises and individual class projects. Topics of study include understanding the role and responsibilities of student government in a university setting, institutional change, decision-making, advocacy and conflict resolution. Students will also study ASSU governing documents, effective funding and event planning processes and roles. They will gain awareness of how to understand and engage with a complex and decentralized organization such as Stanford while honing their leadership skills. They will develop a project they wish to pursue as an elected leader and receive mentorship from university administrators.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 16A: Dynamic Australia: immigrant and indigenous experiences

How did modern Australian society take shape? Within this larger framework, several more focused questions will guide us: What have been the experiences of immigrants, of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, and how have their relations evolved over time? To what degree has Australia been formed by successive waves of immigration? What has been the fate of the Aboriginal peoples? How have intergroup relations evolved since the start of colonialism in the late 18th century? What have been the elements of racial formation, and how have they changed over time? What does it mean to be Australian in the 21st century? How might the creative arts (e.g. music, literature, drama, painting, dance) help us understand Australian identities and intergroup dynamics? As a course project, students will informally interview someone whose life history has involved large-scale displacement, voluntary or otherwise. This is intended as a means of sharpening awareness of migration in history - as articulated at the level of individuals and communities. This course is primarily intended for students enrolled in or waitlisted for the BOSP Summer Seminar in Sydney (June-July 2019), and as such focuses on historical and social milieux. However, all participants will find it a wide-ranging introduction to Australian society and a case study in intergroup dynamics.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 22SI: SENSA Labs Social Enterprise Seminar

As a social entrepreneur, how do you know you¿re solving the right problem? What values, approaches, and strategies differentiate a social enterprise from other startups? What does it take to build a venture that is both socially-minded and profitable? Through engaging with influential speakers, course-long mentors, case studies, and hands-on workshops, students will gain the skills needed to build, pitch, and manage a social venture. Expert Silicon Valley speakers and mentors encourage networking as well as peer to peer learning. The course culminates in Demo Day, an event in which teams pitch their ideas directly to experienced investors. At the end of the course, students will be able to understand the field of social entrepreneurship through the tenets of Sustainability, Impact and Performance, Innovation, and Leadership; apply the theories from the Lean Startup and Social Business Models to an identified need; and measure the impact of a social enterprise and synthesize social entrepreneurship concepts through investor pitching. Limited enrollment. Application required: https://forms.gle/k9NFcETszUqqryjD6
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; RED-HORSE MOHL, V. (PI)

CSRE 24SI: The Continuity of Abu Nuwas's Homoeroticism in Arab Queer Literary Modernity

This course will hold space for discussions surrounding the precolonial poetic foundations of Arab Queerness, the continuity of such foundations in its modern literary representations, and he potential Arab Queer futurities that such modern representations move toward. How are representations of homoeroticism in Abu Nuwas's poetry definitive of a pre-colonial Arab Queer identity that is separate from Western definitions of Queerness rooted in the Gay Liberation movement of the 1970s? Do modern literary representations of queerness in Arab literature, even after US sociopolitical imperialism, carry a central understanding of Arab Queerness? How is the earlier explored Pre-Colonial Arab Queerness carried forward in these modern Arab Queer literary representations? Are there differences? How do these literary understandings and analyses inform the greater theoretical discussion of queer past, present, and future? Readings will include poetry by classical Arab-Persian poet Abu Nuwas, and novels by Saleem Haddad, Abdellah Taïa, and Mohammed Abdel Nabi. These works will be discussed within a theoretical framework informed by the works of Joseph Massad, Sara Ahmed, Jose Esteban Muñoz, Eve Sedgwick, and Jaspir Puar.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marquez, R. (PI)

CSRE 27SI: Revolution and the Pilipinx Diaspora: Exploring Global Activism in Local Communities (ASNAMST 27SI)

This course aims to provide students with an opportunity to not only learn about current issues in the local Filipino American community, but also develop their own plans to take action on social justice issues. Through mediums of art and reflection, we will explore themes of diaspora and liberation by focusing on the Filipino experience and the local and vocal histories of activism in the Bay Area. We will be connecting local histories to the current global narrative while also connecting our past to our own identity formation as activists and community leaders. In doing so, we hope to explore the implications of local activism within the greater context of global organizing. The course will expose students to local community leaders and ways in which they can support and plug in to local initiatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antonio, A. (PI)

CSRE 33SI: Examining Access for FLI Students in Higher Education

Stanford's past two presidents have steadfastly declared Stanford as a vehicle of upwards mobility and to correct inequalities. Essentially, this means providing sufficient access to students who often are most in need: first-generation and/or low-income (FLI) students. However, what exactly is access? How can we understand different kinds of access in order to improve the holistic quality of education students receive?nnTo answer these questions, we will define access and the forces which shape it, such as economic systems, intersectionality, and the educational pipeline. Next, to better prepare ourselves as advocates for educational improvement, we will examine the historical trend of access at colleges as case studies (Stanford, Berkeley, Foothills, and Brown). Finally, we will ask how accessibility influences how students fare after leaving the educational system.nnUltimately, we will gain analytical and heuristic techniques to pinpoint and advocate for improvements to educational access for FLI students.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 55M: MMUF Seminar

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 100P: Student and Community Organizing for Social Change

CSRE 100P is a series of community organizing trainings focused on how to use grassroots techniques as a means of political participation. The course is run in partnership with Stanford in Government (SIG), Associated Students of Stanford University (ASSU), and different campus groups. Students will have the opportunity to hear from top experts in grassroots and community organizing. They will also have the chance to engage directly with the speakers on how their experiences have shaped their approach to and understanding political organizing in the current political environment. This course will meet over six sessions, two Friday sessions and four Saturday sessions. Dates of Saturday Trainings are April 13, May 4, May 11and June 1. Friday sessions are April 5th and June 7th (12:00pm-2:00pm).
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 101P: Student and Community Organizing for Social Change

This course explores student and community organizing history, theories of practice, as well as models of social change through a mix of guest speakers from social justice groups, theoretical readings and practicum-based work. The major component of this course is participating in an intensive three-day skills-based training that will teach students how to be more strategic in their fight for justice on campus and in the community. The training consists of a series of presentations, exercises, and discussions that teach sets of skills and concepts related to student and community organizing. The course is designed for students with interests in student and community organizing, as well as those considering careers and leadership opportunities in a variety of nonprofit and social justice fields. This is designated as a one-unit course, with a community engaged learning option for two additional units. The dates for the intensive skills-based training will be May 4th-6th. The training is required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 103: Intergroup Communication (PSYCH 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication. The objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity. If you are interested in enrolling in this class, please fill out the following survey to be considered- https://tinyurl.com/psych103winter19. After filling out this survey, you do not need to reach out any further. In order to be fully considered for enrollment in the class, you must attend the first day of class. Enrollment will not be offered to those who are not present on the first day.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 103F: Intergroup Communication Facilitation (PSYCH 103F)

Are you interested in strengthening your skills as a facilitator or section leader? Interested in opening up dialogue around identity within your community or among friends? This course will provide you with facilitation tools and practice, but an equal part of the heart of this class will come from your own reflection on the particular strengths and challenges you may bring to facilitation and how to craft a personal style that works best for you. This reflection process is ongoing, for the instructors as well as the students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 108X: The Changing Face of America (EDUC 108, POLISCI 226A)

This upper-division seminar will explore some of the most significant issues related to educational access and equity facing American society in the 21st century. Designed for students with significant leadership potential who have already studied these topics in lecture format, this seminar will focus on in-depth analysis of the impact of race on educational access and a variety of educational reform initiatives. Please submit a brief statement with "EDUC 108" in the subject line that details your reasons for applying and what leadership skills, experience, and perspectives you would contribute to the course to: Ginny Smith (gsmith@law.stanford.edu) and Wilson Tong (wtong@commonsense.org). The deadline is rolling.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 121: Discourse of the Colonized: Native American and Indigenous Voices (NATIVEAM 121)

Using the assigned texts covering the protest movements in the 20th century to the texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century, students will engage in discussions on decolonization. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and a 15-20 minute presentation on the topic of interest relating to decolonization for Native Americans in one longer paper. Approaching research from an Indigenous perspective will be encouraged throughout.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Red Shirt, D. (PI)

CSRE 123C: "Third World Problems?" Environmental Anthropology and the Intersectionality of Justice (ANTHRO 123C)

As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as natural resource, public good, human right, need, or commodity - determine the contours of such regimes? We will also study chronic, quieter environmental problems and the responses they (do not) generate. Working through a variety of writing genres - ethnographies, policy literature, and legal and corporate publicity material - will enable students to appreciate what anthropology can contribute to the conversation on environmental justice, and state and corporate bureaucracies and their mandates. The course draws on examples from a wide range of settings. The course is offered as an introduction to environmental anthropology and takes students through key themes - infrastructure, race, class, privatization, justice, violence - by focusing on water. It requires no background in anthropology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hayat, M. (PI)

CSRE 127C: Human in a Time of War (FEMGEN 127)

It has often been said that the post-9/11 era has been one of never-ending war for the United States. Privatization and the increasing proliferation of ever more removed technologies of killing have raised questions regarding the disposability of racialized populations targeted for submission or containment. The global, ubiquitous nature of the U.S. military industrial complex has made war synonymous with impunity.nnHowever, racialized populations have arguably been under siege and positioned as disposable since the colonization of the Americas. This course draws upon Alexander Weheliye¿s (2014) challenge to move beyond the particular, querying how racialized, gendered experiences condition more expansive notions of the human. Following Jodi Kim¿s notion of the protracted afterlife of the Cold War as epistemological structure, this course traces the continuities and transformations in constructions of populations as more or less human, from settler colonial conquest to the post-9/11 era. How has racial and gendered violence functioned to determine not only which bodies matter but which lives are legible and which subjects granted the full range of human complexity? Recognizing the ¿layered interconnectedness of political violence, racialization, and the human,¿ this course also engages ¿the existence of alternative modes of life alongside the violence, subjection, exploitation, and racialization that define the modern human¿ (Weheliye, 1-2).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chhun, L. (PI)

CSRE 129: Camus (COMPLIT 229B, FRENCH 129, HISTORY 235F)

"The Don Draper of Existentialism" for Adam Gopnik, "the ideal husband of contemporary letters" for Susan Sontag, and "the admirable conjunction of a man, of an action, and of a work" for Sartre, Camus embodies the very French figure of the "intellectuel engagé," or public intellectual. From his birth in 1913 into a poor family in Algeria to the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, from Paris to the Mediterranean world, Camus engaged in the great ethical battles of his time, from the fight against nazism and communism, from questioning colonial rules to the Algerian War of Independence. Through readings and films, we will explore his multiple, long-lasting legacies. Readings from Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, Kamel Daoud, Mouloud Feraoun, Alice Kaplan, A.B. Yehoshua, Yasmina Khadra. This course is a WIM course. Students will work on their production of written French, in addition to speaking French and reading comprehension. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ulloa, M. (PI)

CSRE 136U: The Psychology of Scarcity: Its Implications for Psychological Functioning and Education (PSYCH 136, PSYCH 236A)

This course brings together several literatures on the psychological, neurological, behavioral and learning impact of scarcities, especially those of money (poverty) time and food. It will identify the known psychological hallmarks of these scarcities and explore their implications for psychological functioning, well-being and education--as well as, how they can be dealt with by individuals and in education.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 138, ANTHRO 238)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fullwiley, D. (PI)

CSRE 140S: Casablanca - Algiers - Tunis : Cities on the Edge (AFRICAAM 236B, COMPLIT 236A, FRENCH 236, FRENCH 336, HISTORY 245C, URBANST 140F)

Casablanca, Algiers and Tunis embody three territories, real and imaginary, which never cease to challenge the preconceptions of travelers setting sight on their shores. In this class, we will explore the myriad ways in which these cities of North Africa, on the edge of Europe and of Africa, have been narrated in literature, cinema, and popular culture. Home to Muslims, Christians, and Jews, they are an ebullient laboratory of social, political, religious, and cultural issues, global and local, between the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries. We will look at mass images of these cities, from films to maps, novels to photographs, sketching a new vision of these magnets as places where power, social rituals, legacies of the Ottoman and French colonial pasts, and the influence of the global economy collude and collide. Special focus on class, gender, and race.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ulloa, M. (PI)

CSRE 141: Gentrification (AFRICAAM 241A, URBANST 141)

Neighborhoods in the Bay Area and around the world are undergoing a transformation known as gentrification. Middle- and upper-income people are moving into what were once low-income areas, and housing costs are on the rise. Tensions between newcomers and old timers, who are often separated by race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation, can erupt; high rents may force long-time residents to leave. In this class we will move beyond simplistic media depictions to explore the complex history, nature, causes and consequences of this process. Students will learn through readings, films, class discussions, and engagement with a local community organization. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kahan, M. (PI)

CSRE 142C: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice (AFRICAST 142, AFRICAST 242, INTNLREL 142)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 146B: Approaching Research in the Community: Design and Methods (URBANST 123B)

This course focuses on issues of research design and how to select specific methodological strategies to assure ethical and effective partnership-based research. In this course, students will plan for their own participation in a CBRF project. Topical themes will include best practice strategies for (a) defining and selecting community problems or issues to be addressed, (b) generating relevant and useful research questions, (c) choosing specific means and methods for data collection [e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.], (d) storing, organizing and analyzing data, (e) reflecting on and critiquing research findings, and (f) carrying out dissemination in ways that can be expected to enhance community power and advance community development. Students will be provided with opportunities to workshop their respective projects-in-development, (e.g., developing and sharing research questions, data collection instruments, strategies for engaging community constituents as co-researchers, etc.). This is a required course for students participating in the Haas Center for Public Service Community-based Research Fellows Program, but enrollment is open to all Stanford students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Leon, M. (PI); Tien, J. (PI)

CSRE 147A: Race and Ethnicity Around the World (SOC 147, SOC 247)

(Graduate students register for 247.) How have the definitions, categories, and consequences of race and ethnicity differed across time and place? This course offers a historical and sociological survey of racialized divisions around the globe. Case studies include: affirmative action policies, policies of segregation and ghettoization, countries with genocidal pasts, invisible minorities, and countries that refuse to count their citizens by race at all.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Saperstein, A. (PI)

CSRE 148D: Ingl├ęs Personal: Coaching Everyday Community English (CHILATST 148, EDUC 148)

Theoretical foundation for volunteer tutors of English language learners in urban environments working with children in school-based programs or adults in community-based settings. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

CSRE 148R: Los Angeles: A Cultural History (AMSTUD 148)

This course traces a cultural history of Los Angeles from the early twentieth century to the present. Approaching popular representations of Los Angeles as our primary source, we discuss the ways that diverse groups of Angelenos have represented their city on the big and small screens, in the press, in the theater, in music, and in popular fiction. We focus in particular on the ways that conceptions of race and gender have informed representations of the city. Possible topics include: fashion and racial violence in the Zoot Suit Riots of the Second World War, Disneyland as a suburban fantasy, cinematic representations of Native American life in Bunker Hill in the 1961 film The Exiles, the independent black cinema of the Los Angeles Rebellion, the Anna Deaver Smith play Twilight Los Angeles about the civil unrest that gripped the city in 1992, and the 2019 film Once Upon a Time¿in Hollywood.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gow, W. (PI)

CSRE 151P: Transpacific Performance (TAPS 151P, TAPS 351P)

Building on exciting new work in transpacific studies, this course explores how performance reveals the many ways in which cultures and communities intersect across the diverse and dynamic Pacific Ocean world, covering works from the Americas and Asia, Pacific Islands, and Australia. In an era when the Pacific has emerged as the center of global cultural and financial power, what critical and ethical role does performance play in treating the region's entangled histories, its urgent contemporary issues, and possible futures?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 160J: Conjure Art 101: Performances of Ritual, Spirituality and Decolonial Black Feminist Magic (AFRICAAM 160J, DANCE 160J)

Conjure Art is a movement and embodied practice course looking at the work and techniques of artists of color who utilize spirituality and ritual practices in their art making and performance work to evoke social change. In this course we will discuss the work of artists who bring spiritual ritual in their art making while addressing issues of spiritual accountability and cultural appropriation. Throughout the quarter we will welcome guest artists who make work along these lines, while exploring movement, writing, singing and visual art making. This class will culminate in a performance ritual co-created by students and instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 161P: Entrepreneurship for Social and Racial Equity (NATIVEAM 161)

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to business ownership with a focus on owning and operating businesses within diverse communities with an aim to create social impact for future generations as well as profitability and sustainability models. The course will introduce the beginning elements of creating a business (formation, product, business plan) as well as the additional overlay of social impact and cultural considerations. Types of financing as well as effective pitching will also be covered. Course materials will include instructor presentations, case studies, homework assignments, outside hours at campus ¿labs¿, creation of students¿ own business concept plan and guest lectures from successful entrepreneurs working within Silicon Valley and diverse communities. Resources (financing sources, accelerators and incubators), case studies, role models and guest lecturers will be an integral part of this course which can lead to internship opportunities (the latter via application).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; RED-HORSE MOHL, V. (PI)

CSRE 162: The Politics of Sex: Work, Family, and Citizenship in Modern American Women's History (AMSTUD 161, FEMGEN 161, HISTORY 61, HISTORY 161)

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern American womanhood by asking how Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women navigated the changing sexual, economic, and political landscapes of the twentieth century. Through secondary readings, primary sources, films, music, and literature we explore the opportunities and boundaries on groups of women in the context of historical events that included immigration, urbanization, wartime, depression, the Cold War, as well as recurrent feminist and conservative political movements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freedman, E. (PI)

CSRE 170A: Undoing Racism: The People's Institute for Survival and Beyond (AFRICAAM 170A)

The fabric of racism is inextricably woven and constructed into the founding principles of the United States. Racism was done and it can be undone through effective anti-racist organizing with, and in accountability to the communities most impacted by racism. The People's Institute believes that effective community and institutional change happens when those who serve as agents of transformation understand the foundations of race and racism and how they continually function as a barrier to community self-determination and self-sufficiency.nnThis course focuses on understanding what racism is, where it comes from, how it functions, why it persists and how it can be undone. The classes, led by organizers of the People's Institute, guest artists and scholars, utilize a systematic approach that emphasizes learning from history, developing leadership, maintaining accountability to communities, creating networks, undoing internalized racial oppression and understanding the role of organizational gate keeping as a mechanism for perpetuating racism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Holt, A. (PI)

CSRE 178P: The Science and Practice of Effective Advocacy (PUBLPOL 178, URBANST 178)

How can purposeful collective action change government policy, business practices and cultural norms? This course will teach students about the components of successful change campaigns and help develop the practical skills to carry out such efforts. The concepts taught will be relevant to both issue advocacy and electoral campaigns, and be evidence-based, drawing on lessons from social psychology, political science, communications, community organizing and social movements. The course will meet twice-a-week for 90 minutes, and class time will combine engaged learning exercises, discussions and lectures. There will be a midterm and final. Students will be able to take the course for 3 or 5 units. Students who take the course for 5 units will participate in an advocacy project with an outside organization during the quarter, attend a related section meeting and write reflections. For 5 unit students, the section meeting is on Tuesdays, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Litvak, L. (PI)

CSRE 180A: Foundations of Social Research (SOC 180A, SOC 280A)

Formulating a research question, developing hypotheses, probability and non-probability sampling, developing valid and reliable measures, qualitative and quantitative data, choosing research design and data collection methods, challenges of making causal inference, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research. Emphasis is on how social research is done, rather than application of different methods. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology and Urban Studies majors, and Sociology coterms.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pedulla, D. (PI)

CSRE 180B: Introduction to Data Analysis (SOC 180B, SOC 280B)

Methods for analyzing and evaluating quantitative data in sociological research. Students will be taught how to run and interpret multivariate regressions, how to test hypotheses, and how to read and critique published data analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jackson, M. (PI)

CSRE 194NCR: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Introduction to Cultural Rhetorics (PWR 194NCR)

All cultures have their own ways of communicating and making meaning through a range of situated rhetorical practices. In this gateway course to the Notation in Cultural Rhetorics, you'll explore the diverse contexts in which these practices are made and continue to be made;learn methodologies for examining their rhetorical production across media and modality; and study situated cultural practices and their historical and current developments.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 196C: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jimenez, T. (PI)

CSRE 198: Internship for Public Service (CHILATST 198)

Students should consult with CCSRE Director of Community Engaged Learning (ddmurray@stanford.edu) to develop or gain approval for an internship that addresses race/ethnicity, public service, and social justice. Students will read a selection of short readings relevant to their placement, write bi-weekly reflections, and meet bi-weekly with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Units are determined by the number of hours per week at the internship (2 hours/week = 1 unit; 5 hours/week = 2 units; 8 hours/week = 3 units; etc.) Group meetings may be required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marquez, R. (PI)

CSRE 200Y: CSRE Senior Honors Research

Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Suechting, M. (PI)

CSRE 200Z: CSRE Senior Honors Research

Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Suechting, M. (PI)

CSRE 201D: Public Art Interventions in Social & Cultural Spaces

This team-taught course brings long-time artists, organizers, and researchers to present a range of strategies for creating public art and cultural productions in various social and cultural spaces. Our exploration of public art engages ideas about social space and public discourse. An approach that finds parallels in the art history lexicon of community-based; social sculpture, and place-making to name a few of the movements identified as other than the fine arts, ours is centered on work made collectively and in social and lived spaces through dialogue and conversation with others.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 201L: Doing Public History (HISTORY 200L)

Examines history outside the classroom; its role in political/cultural debates in U.S. and abroad. Considers functions, practices, and reception of history in public arena, including museums, memorials, naming of buildings, courtrooms, websites, op-eds. Analyzes controversies arising when historians' work outside the academy challenges the status quo; role funders, interest groups, and the public play in promoting, shaping, or suppressing historical interpretation. Who gets to tell a group's story? What changes can public history enable? Students will engage in public history projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 226D: The Holocaust: Insights from New Research (CSRE 326D, HISTORY 226D, HISTORY 326D, JEWISHST 226E, JEWISHST 326D)

Overview of the history of the Holocaust, the genocide of European Jews. Explores its causes, course, consequences, and memory. Addresses the events themselves, as well as the roles of perpetrators and bystanders, dilemmas faced by victims, collaboration of local populations, and the issue of rescue. Considers how the Holocaust was and is remembered and commemorated by victims and participants alike. Uses different kinds of sources: scholarly work, memoirs, diaries, film, and primary documents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 230: Law, Order, & Algorithms (CS 209, MS&E 330, SOC 279)

Human decision making is increasingly being displaced by predictive algorithms. Judges sentence defendants based on statistical risk scores; regulators take enforcement actions based on predicted violations; advertisers target materials based on demographic attributes; and employers evaluate applicants and employees based on machine-learned models. One concern with the rise of such algorithmic decision making is that it may replicate or exacerbate human bias. This course surveys the legal and ethical principles for assessing the equity of algorithms, describes statistical techniques for designing fair systems, and considers how anti-discrimination law and the design of algorithms may need to evolve to account for machine bias. Concepts will be developed in part through guided in-class coding exercises. Admission is by consent of instructor and is limited to 20 students. To enroll in the class, please complete the course application by March 20, available at: https://5harad.com/mse330/. Grading is based on response papers, class participation, and a final project. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent knowledge of coding.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 230C: Digital Civil Society (COMM 230C)

Digital technologies have fundamentally changed how people come together to make change in the world, a sphere of action commonly called 'civil society'. How did this happen, what's being done about it, and what does it mean for democratic governance and collective action in the future? This course analyzes the opportunities and challenges technology presents to associational life, free expression, individual privacy, and collective action. Year-long seminar sequence for advanced undergraduates or master's students. Each quarter may be taken independently. Spring focuses on emergent trends related to democracy and associational life, from the 2010s and into the future. Topics include the Arab Spring, global political propaganda, 'born digital' organizations, the development of electronic governments, and biotechnologies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 252C: The Old South: Culture, Society, and Slavery (AFRICAAM 252C, HISTORY 252C)

This course explores the political, social, and cultural history of the antebellum American South, with an emphasis on the history of African-American slavery. Topics include race and race making, slave community and resistance, gender and reproduction, class and immigration, commodity capitalism, technology, disease and climate, indigenous Southerners, white southern honor culture, the Civil War, and the region's place in national mythmaking and memory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivarius, K. (PI)

CSRE 260: Race and Ethnicity in Urban California (AFRICAAM 169A, AMSTUD 169, URBANST 169)

The course is part of an ongoing research project that examines the consequences of longterm social, economic, and political changes in ethnic and race relations in in urban California. The required readings, discussions, and service learning component all provide a platform for students to explore important issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid demographic transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McKibben, C. (PI)

CSRE 291: Gentrification and Schools: Urban Structure and the Remaking of Cities (EDUC 390, URBANST 141A)

This course is designed to help students develop a more sophisticated understanding of educational inequality in the contemporary U.S. city. This course will survey existing literature about the intersection of gentrification and urban schooling, focusing on policies and practices that gave rise to the current urban condition, theory and research about urban redevelopment, collateral consequences for schools and communities, and how these issues relate to the structure and governance of urban schools as well as to the geography of opportunity more broadly.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; pearman, f. (PI)

CSRE 301: Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

an advanced introduction to concepts and debates within the multi-disciplinary field of comparative studies in race and ethnicity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 326D: The Holocaust: Insights from New Research (CSRE 226D, HISTORY 226D, HISTORY 326D, JEWISHST 226E, JEWISHST 326D)

Overview of the history of the Holocaust, the genocide of European Jews. Explores its causes, course, consequences, and memory. Addresses the events themselves, as well as the roles of perpetrators and bystanders, dilemmas faced by victims, collaboration of local populations, and the issue of rescue. Considers how the Holocaust was and is remembered and commemorated by victims and participants alike. Uses different kinds of sources: scholarly work, memoirs, diaries, film, and primary documents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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