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CS 402: Beyond Bits and Atoms: Designing Technological Tools (EDUC 236)

This course is a practicum in the design of technology-enabled curricula and hands-on learning environments. It focuses on the theories, concepts, and practices necessary to design effective, low-cost educational technologies that support learning in all contexts for a variety of diverse learners. We will explore theories and design frameworks from constructivist and constructionist learning perspectives, as well as the lenses of critical pedagogy, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and interaction design for children. The course will concretize theories, concepts, and practices in weekly presentations (including examples) from industry experts with significant backgrounds and proven expertise in designing successful, evidence-based, educational technology products. The Practicum provides the design foundation for EDUC 211 / CS 402 L, a hands-on lab focused on introductory prototyping and the fabrication of incipient interactive, educational technologies. (No prior prototyping experience required.) Interested students must also register for either EDUC 211 or CS 402L, complete the application at http://bit.ly/educ236 by January 4 at 5 p.m., and come to the first class at 8:30 a.m. in CERAS 108.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Grant, W. (PI)

CS 402L: Beyond Bits and Atoms - Lab (EDUC 211)

This lab course is a hands-on introduction to the prototyping and fabrication of tangible, interactive technologies, with a special focus on learning and education. (No prior prototyping experience required.) It focuses on the design and prototyping of low-cost technologies that support learning in all contexts for a variety of diverse learners. You will be introduced to, and learn how to use state-of-the-art fabrication machines (3D printers, laser cutters, Go Go Boards, Sensors, etc.) to design educational toolkits, educational toys, science kits, and tangible user interfaces. The lab builds on the the theoretical and evidence-based foundations explored in the EDUC 236 / CS 402 Practicum. Interested students must also register for either EDUC 236 or CS 402, complete the application at http://bit.ly/educ236 by January 4 at 5 p.m., and come to the first class at 8:30 a.m. in CERAS 108.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Grant, W. (PI)

EDUC 171: Preschool Counts: Engaging Young Children in Math

Restricted to students who participate in a service learning program focused on early math learning. Training for activities in preschool classrooms. Focus is on the teaching of math to young children, but also includes background on issues related to young children's cognitive, language, and social development; classroom management; cultural diversity; and early childhood education programs. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 193A: Listen Up! Core Peer Counseling Skills

Topics: verbal and non-verbal skills, open and closed questions, paraphrasing, working with feelings, summarization, and integration. Individual training, group exercises, role play practice with optional video feedback. Sections on relevance to crisis counseling and student life. Guest speakers from University and community agencies. Students develop and apply skills in University settings. Sections will be assigned during the first week of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 200B: Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods

(Formerly EDUC 151.) Primarily for master's students: An introduction to the core concepts and methods of qualitative research. Through a variety of hands-on learning activities, readings, field experiences, class lectures, and discussions, students will explore the processes and products of qualitative inquiry.nnThis is a graduate level course. No undergraduates may enroll. Priority will be given to GSE students, and final enrollment depends on instructor approval after the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 202: Introduction to International and Comparative Education

Contemporary theoretical debates about educational change and development, and the international dimension of issues in education. Emphasis is on the development of students' abilities to make cross-national and historical comparisons of educational phenomena. Enrollment in EDUC 202L is required to enroll in EDUC 202.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carnoy, M. (PI)

EDUC 202I: International Education Policy Workshop (EDUC 102I)

This is a project-based workshop. Practical introduction to issues in educational policy making, education reform, educational planning, implementation of policy interventions, and monitoring and evaluation in developing country contexts. Preference to students enrolled in ICE/IEAPA, but open to other students interested in international development or comparative public policy with instructor's consent. Attendance at first class required for enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 203A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 103A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scott, R. (PI)

EDUC 204: Introduction to Philosophy of Education (ETHICSOC 204, PHIL 231)

How to think philosophically about educational problems. Recent influential scholarship in philosophy of education. No previous study in philosophy required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Callan, E. (PI)

EDUC 208B: Curriculum Construction

The theories and methods of curriculum development and improvement. Topics: curriculum ideologies, perspectives on design, strategies for diverse learners, and the politics of curriculum construction and implementation. Students develop curriculum plans for use in real settings. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pope, D. (PI)

EDUC 213: Introduction to Teaching

Key concepts in teaching and learning; teacher content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge; student prior knowledge and preconceptions; cognition and metacognition; classroom culture, motivation, and management; teaching diverse populations; comparison of teaching models; analysis of teaching; standards, accountability, and assessment of learning; assessing teaching quality; online learning and teaching.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wischnia, S. (PI)

EDUC 220C: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, SOC 130, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ramirez, F. (PI)

EDUC 220D: History of School Reform: Origins, Policies, Outcomes, and Explanations (HISTORY 258E)

Strongly recommended for students in the POLS M.A. program; others welcome. Focus is on 20th-century U.S. Intended and unintended patterns in school change; the paradox of reform that schools are often reforming but never seem to change much; rhetorics of reform and factors that inhibit change. Case studies emphasize the American high school. This course is strongly recommended for POLS students pursuing K -12 leadership.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 221A: Policy Analysis in Education

Major concepts associated with the development, enactment, and execution of educational policy. Issues of policy implementation, agenda setting and problem formulation, politics, and intergovernmental relations. Case studies. Goal is to identify factors that affect how analysts and policy makers learn about and influence education. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Reininger, M. (PI)

EDUC 222: Resource Allocation in Education

This course covers economic principles and tools for informing resource allocation decisions in education. Students will review concepts related to educational goods and values; the costs and benefits of different levels and types of schooling; public versus private schooling; as well as adequacy and equity in education financing. Students will also learn about the use of educational production functions, teacher value-added estimation, cost effectiveness analysis, experimental program evaluation, systematic reviews, and causal chain analysis. Prerequisites: introductory statistics and regression analysis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 228G: Becoming Literate in School III

Third in a three-course required sequence of reading and language arts theory and methodology for candidates in STEP Elementary Teacher program. Theories for guiding instruction and curricular choices.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 232: Culture, Learning, and Poverty

This course examines the categories and methods used to analyze and explain educational inequalities in the United States from 1950 to present. Approaches to theories of school failure and methods of intervention are distinguished by their ideas on the play of learning, language, cognition, culture, and social class in human development. Particular attention is given to the Culture of Poverty controversies of the 1960s and their recent emergence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Beckham, K. (PI)

EDUC 240: Adolescent Development and Learning

How do adolescents develop their identities, manage their inner and outer worlds, and learn? Presuppositions: that fruitful instruction takes into account the developmental characteristics of learners and the task demands of specific curricula; and that teachers can promote learning and motivation by mediating among the characteristics of students, the curriculum, and the wider social context of the classroom. Prerequisite: STEP student or consent of instructor. (STEP)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Richardson, N. (PI)

EDUC 249: Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism (EDUC 149)

Sociolinguistic perspective. Emphasis is on typologies of bilingualism, the acquisition of bilingual ability, description and measurement, and the nature of societal bilingualism. Prepares students to work with bilingual students and their families and to carry out research in bilingual settings.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 266: Educational Neuroscience

An introduction to the growing intersection between education research and emerging research on functional brain development. Students will probe the contributions and limitations of emerging theoretical and empirical contribution of neuroscience approaches to specific academic skills such as reading and mathematics, as well as exposure to general processes crucial for educational success, including motivation, attention, and social cognition. Final projects will explore these themes in the service of interventions designed to improve how these functions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McCandliss, B. (PI)

EDUC 278: Introduction to Issues in Evaluation

Open to master's and doctoral students with priority to students in the School of Education. Focus is on the basic literature and major theoretical and practical issues in the field of program evaluation. Topics include: defining purpose, obtaining credible evidence, the role of the evaluator, working with stakeholder, values in evaluation, utilization, and professional standards. The course project is to design an evaluation for a complex national or international program selected by the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI)

EDUC 281: Technology for Learners

How can we use technology to improve learning? Many hope that technology will make learning easier, faster, or accessible to more learners. This course explores a variety of approaches to designing tools for learning, the theories behind them, and the research that tests their effectiveness. Strong focus on evaluating new tools for specific learners and subjects. Space is limited. Priority is given to master's students in the LDT Master's Program. To learn about the design of digital tools for learning, we recommend taking this course together with EDUC 230, Learning Experience Design.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 288: Organizational Analysis (SOC 271)

Principles of organizational behavior and analysis; theories of group and individual behavior; organizational culture; and applications to school organization and design. Case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

EDUC 302: Behavior Design

Students learn Behavior Design and practice applying the methods to change human behavior in measurable ways. In this particular course, all projects will focus on one theme: Designing the first step.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fogg, B. (PI)

EDUC 306A: Economics of Education in the Global Economy

Case material considers development problems in the U.S. and abroad. Discussion sections on economic aspects of educational development.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carnoy, M. (PI)

EDUC 306B: Global Education Policy & Organization (PUBLPOL 316)

Education policy, politics, and development. Topics include: politics, interests, institutions, policy, and civil society; how schools and school systems operate as political systems; how policy making occurs in educational systems; and theories of development.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 306D: World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives (EDUC 136, SOC 231)

Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility, and equality; education, international organizations, and world culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ramirez, F. (PI)

EDUC 329: Seminar on Teacher Professional Development

Theories, principles, design, and practices of professional development. Topics include: pedagogies of professional development;design principles for transformative professional development; frameworks and processes to support teacher learning; research on professional development processes and outcomes; and policy issues. Optional practicum in subsequent terms in which course participants are able to offer a professional development opportunity to practicing teachers through the Center to Support Excellence in Teaching.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Borko, H. (PI)

EDUC 333A: Understanding Learning Environments

Advanced seminar. Theoretical approaches to learning used to analyze learning environments and develop goals for designing resources and activities to support effective learning practices.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 334A: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Practice

(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 334B: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Methods

(Same as LAW 660B). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation, or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees of the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 334C: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Coursework

(Same as LAW 660C). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation, or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 337: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

EDUC 339: Advanced Topics in Quantitative Policy Analysis

For doctoral students. How to develop a researchable question and research design, identify data sources, construct conceptual frameworks, and interpret empirical results. Presentation by student participants and scholars in the field. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 342: Child Development and New Technologies

Focus is on the experiences computing technologies afford children and how these experiences might influence development. Sociocultural theories of development as a conceptual framework for understanding how computing technologies interact with the social ecology of the child and how children actively use technology to meet their own goals. Emphasis is on influences of interactive technology on cognitive development, identity, and social development equity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Barron, B. (PI)

EDUC 347: The Economics of Higher Education

(Same as GSBGEN 348) Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload; costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bettinger, E. (PI)

EDUC 360: Child Development in Contexts of Risk and Adversity

In this course students will learn about theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues pertaining to developmental psychopathology and resilience of children and adolescents. The course focuses on (1) current conceptual and empirical issues; (2) cognitive, affective, and motivational processes that underlie some of the most salient childhood mental health symptoms and disorders; (3) family, school, and cultural factors that contribute to developmental psychopathology and resilience; and (4) cutting-edge analytic methods that are currently employed in studies of developmental psychopathology and resilience.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Obradovic, J. (PI)

EDUC 377B: Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures

(Same as STRAMGT 368). This course seeks to provide a survey of the strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations and their executive and board leaders, in the era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. The students will also be introduced to core managerial issues uniquely defined by this sector such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance. The course also provides an overview of the sector, including its history and economics. Cases involve a range of nonprofits, from smaller, social entrepreneurial to larger, more traditional organizations, including education, social service, environment, health care, religion, NGO's and performing arts. In exploring these issues, this course reinforces the frameworks and concepts of strategic management introduced in the core first year courses. In addition to case discussions, the course employs role plays, study group exercises and many outsider speakers.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Meehan, B. (PI)

EDUC 377C: Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum

(Same as GSBGEN 381). A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Philanthropy is resource, background, age, profession, and industry agnostic, and ¿Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum¿ will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and this course will empower you with the perspective, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential both immediately and over your lifetime. You will be exposed to a diverse array of giving models and approaches, and be given structured space to weigh and appraise your individual philanthropic point of view and approach. Through deep introspection, you will define and/or refine your social change purpose and create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values, beliefs and resources (including intellectual, human, network, experiential and financial capital) into measurable social value. Class activities will include debates and simulations such as discussing the benefits and challenges of diverse giving models, creating personal giving strategies, giving fundraising pitches and assessing actual foundation grant proposals. Each student will select and complete due diligence on a local nonprofit and create a formal grant proposal. Students will peer-review grant proposals, participate in a multi-stage grantmaking process and allocate $20,000 of grants funded by the Learning by Giving Foundation and Andreessen Philanthropies. Students will also have the unique opportunity to directly connect and engage with globally renowned philanthropic leaders, including Darren Walker (Ford Foundation), Laura Muñoz Arnold (Arnold Ventures), Justin Steele (Google.org), Crystal Hayling (Libra Foundation) and Holden Karnofsky (Open Philanthropy Project), among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Arrillaga, L. (PI)

EDUC 377F: Disruptions in Education

(Same as GSBGEN 345). This course will explore the contemporary higher education industry, focusing especially on the places where disruptions of all kinds present significant opportunities and challenges for investors, entrepreneurs, and the businesses that serve this huge global market, as well as for faculty, students, and higher education administrators. Using a variety of readings and case studies to better understand recent disruptions and the unbundling occurring across the post-secondary landscape, from outside and inside the academy, both for-profit and non-profit, the course will examine technology in teaching and learning; the future of the degree and alternatives to the traditional credential; accreditation; competency based education; debt and education financing models; investing in the education space; and tertiary products and platforms that serve the student services market. Guests will include higher education leaders and practitioners, as well as investors and entrepreneurs. Attendance at first class meeting is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Urstein, R. (PI)

EDUC 377H: Diverse Leadership as an Imperative for Impact

(Same as GSBGEN 377). Our society implicitly prizes a particular approach to leadership - but today's cross-sectoral, impact-oriented leader cannot afford to be restricted to a single approach. If we aspire to address challenges across social, economic, and political arenas, with highly charged moral implications and multiple stakeholders, we have an imperative to use all available tools by discovering, celebrating, and advancing diversity in leadership. In this course, we will: (1) study a range of effective leadership approaches; (2) develop broad, transportable skills and frameworks required to lead in any complex setting - business, public sector, nonprofit sector; (3) delve into leadership tradeoffs and tensions; (4) explore and understand our own values and tacit and explicit decision-making criteria; and (5) recognize barriers to diversity and tactics to address them. Guiding questions will include: How does the context shape the solution set? What does inspired and inspiring leadership look like? How do race/gender/other identities enter into the equation? How do I develop my own brand of leadership? We will examine contemporary leaders and controversies in education and elsewhere, draw upon timeless historical thinkers, enjoy the wisdom of guest speakers, and work intensively in small groups to highlight challenges, opportunities, and tradeoffs. By exploring a range of approaches and situations, we will strive for deeper understanding of ourselves and of the context to become a more capable, empathetic and effective leaders.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 386: Leadership and Administration in Higher Education

Definitions of leadership and leadership roles within colleges and universities. Leadership models and organizational concepts. Case study analysis of the problems and challenges facing today's higher education administrators.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cox, G. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI)

EDUC 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (ENGR 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitchell, J. (PI)

EDUC 393: Proseminar: Education, Business, Politics

Overview of the field of education for joint degree (M.B.A./M.A.) students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cox, G. (PI)

EDUC 404: Topics in Brazilian Education: Public Policy and Innovation for the 21st Century

The objective of this seminar is to provide students from different backgrounds an opportunity to learn about current issues and debates on Brazilian education. The seminar will cover topics on the history of Brazilian education; an overview of current school reforms at the federal level; educational assessments; education and economic growth; educational equity; teacher labor market; technology and education; early childhood; and higher education to Brazil.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 417: Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (EDUC 117)

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 421: Powerful Ideas for Learning Sciences and Technology Design: Sociocultural Practices of the Blues

This course is intended as a graduate level seminar that provides in-depth readings and discussions, Professor Roy Pea's professional reflections, and student essay-writing on topics examined in Dr. Pea's select publications and associated influential writings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pea, R. (PI)

EDUC 445: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

(Same as STRAMGT 335) In this course, students will investigate opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurial ventures trying to make a positive impact in public education. The course requires a basic level of understanding of the U.S. K-12 public school system. The first session will analyze the structure of the public education as an industry, with a special emphasis on understanding the achievement gap. Subsequent sessions will explore challenges in increasing efficacy, ensuring financial sustainability, and scaling for entrepreneurs who have sought to change student outcomes, solve pain points, and innovate. The course will feature a variety of ventures (including schools, education technology, training, and supplemental services) and organizational models (for-profit, not-for-profit, and benefit corporation). This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, Board members, donors or investors. (Note: this is not a "how-to" course on starting an entrepreneurial venture.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, G. (PI)

GSBGEN 345: Disruptions in Education

This course explores the contemporary higher education industry, focusing especially on the places where disruptions of all kinds present significant opportunities and challenges for entrepreneurs, investors, and the businesses that serve this huge global market, as well as for faculty, students, and higher education institutions and leaders. Using a variety of readings and case studies to better understand recent disruptions and the unbundling occurring across the postsecondary landscape, from outside and inside the academy, both for-profit and non-profit, the course will examine technology in teaching and learning; the future of the degree and alternatives to the traditional credential; accreditation; competency based education; student debt and education financing models; investing in the education space; workforce, skills development, and lifelong learning; and tertiary products and platforms that serve the student services market. Guests will include higher education leaders and practitioners, as well as investors, entrepreneurs, and social entrepreneurs.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Urstein, R. (PI)

GSBGEN 348: The Economics of Higher Education

(Same as EDUC 347) Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload; costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: ; Bettinger, E. (PI)

GSBGEN 367: Problem Solving for Social Change

Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems -- such as improving educational and health outcomes, conserving energy, and reducing global poverty -- which call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles through problems and case studies drawn from nonprofit organizations, for-profit social enterprises, and governments. Topics include designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing individuals' and organizations' behavior, ranging from incentives and penalties to "nudges;" human-centered design; corporate social responsibility; and pay-for-success programs. We will apply these concepts and tools to address an actual social problem facing Stanford University.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: ; Brest, P. (PI)

GSBGEN 377: Diverse Leadership as an Imperative for Impact

Our society implicitly prizes a particular approach to leadership - but today's cross-sectoral, impact-oriented leader cannot afford to be restricted to a single approach. If we aspire to address challenges across social, economic, and political arenas, with highly charged moral implications and multiple stakeholders, we have an imperative to use all available tools by discovering, celebrating, and advancing diversity in leadership.In this course, we will: (1) study a range of effective leadership approaches; (2) develop broad, transportable skills and frameworks required to lead in any complex setting - business, public sector, nonprofit sector; (3) delve into leadership tradeoffs and tensions; (4) explore and understand our own values and tacit and explicit decision-making criteria; and (5) recognize barriers to diversity and tactics to address them. Guiding questions will include: How does the context shape the solution set? What does inspired and inspiring leadership look like? How do race/gender/other identities enter into the equation? How do I develop my own brand of leadership? We will examine contemporary leaders and controversies in education and elsewhere, draw upon timeless historical thinkers, enjoy the wisdom of guest speakers, and work intensively in small groups to highlight challenges, opportunities, and tradeoffs. By exploring a range of approaches and situations, we will strive for deeper understanding of ourselves and of the context to become a more capable, empathetic and effective leaders.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Colby, S. (PI)

GSBGEN 381: Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum

A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything- time, expertise, networks, credibility, dollars, experience- in any amount to create a better world. Philanthropy is resource, background, age, profession, and industry agnostic, and "Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum" will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and this course will empower you with the perspective, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential both immediately and over your lifetime. You will be exposed to a diverse array of giving models and approaches, and be given structured space to weigh and appraise your individual philanthropic point of view and approach. Through deep introspection, you will define and/or refine your social change purpose and create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values, beliefs and resources (including intellectual, human, network, experiential and financial capital) into measurable social value. Class activities will include debates and simulations such as discussing the benefits and challenges of diverse giving models, creating personal giving strategies, giving fundraising pitches and assessing actual foundation grant proposals. Each student will select and complete due diligence on a local nonprofit and create a formal grant proposal. Students will peer-review grant proposals, participate in a multi-stage grantmaking process and allocate $20,000 of grants funded by the Learning by Giving Foundation and Andreessen Philanthropies. Students will also have the unique opportunity to directly connect and engage with globally renowned philanthropic leaders, including Darren Walker (Ford Foundation), Laura Muñoz Arnold (Arnold Ventures), Justin Steele (Google.org), Crystal Hayling (Libra Foundation) and Holden Karnofsky (Open Philanthropy Project), among others.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Arrillaga, L. (PI)

PSYCH 147: Development in Early Childhood

Supervised experience with young children at Bing Nursery School. 3 units require 4 hours per week in Bing classrooms throughout the quarter; 4 units require 7 hours per week; 5 units require 10.5 hours per week. Seminar on developmental issues in the Bing teaching/learning environment. Recommended: 60 or 146, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STRAMGT 335: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

In this course, students will investigate opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurial ventures trying to make a positive impact in public education. The course requires a basic level of understanding of the U.S. K-12 public school system. The first session will analyze the structure of the public education as an industry, with a special emphasis on understanding the achievement gap. Subsequent sessions will explore challenges in increasing efficacy, ensuring financial sustainability, and scaling for entrepreneurs who have sought to change student outcomes, solve pain points, and innovate. The course will feature a variety of ventures (including schools, education technology, training, and supplemental services) and organizational models (for-profit, not-for-profit, and benefit corporation). This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, Board members, donors or investors. (Note: this is not a "how-to" course on starting an entrepreneurial venture.)
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Lee, G. (PI)

STRAMGT 368: Strategic Leadership of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures

This course seeks to provide a survey of the strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations and their executive and board leaders, in the era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. The students will also be introduced to core managerial issues uniquely defined by this sector such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance. The course also provides an overview of the sector, including its history and economics. Cases involve a range of nonprofits, from smaller, social entrepreneurial to larger, more traditional organizations, including education, social service, environment, health care, religion, NGO's and performing arts. In exploring these issues, this course reinforces the frameworks and concepts of strategic management introduced in the core first year courses. In addition to case discussions, the course employs role plays, study group exercises and many outsider speakers.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Meehan, B. (PI)
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