Print Settings
 

CS 205L: Continuous Mathematical Methods with an Emphasis on Machine Learning

A survey of numerical approaches to the continuous mathematics with emphasis on machine and deep learning. Although motivated from the standpoint of machine learning, the course will focus on the underlying mathematical methods including computational linear algebra and optimization, as well as special topics related to training/using neural networks including automatic differentiation via backward propagation, steepest/gradient decent, momentum methods and adaptive time stepping for ordinary differential equations, etc. Students have the option of doing written homework and either a take-home or in class exams with no programming required, or may skip the exams and instead do a programming project. (Replaces CS205A, and satisfies all similar requirements.) Prerequisites: Math 51; Math 104 or 113 or equivalent or comfortable with the associated material.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fedkiw, R. (PI)

CS 229T: Statistical Learning Theory (STATS 231)

How do we formalize what it means for an algorithm to learn from data? How do we use mathematical thinking to design better machine learning methods? This course focuses on developing mathematical tools for answering these questions. We will present various learning algorithms and prove theoretical guarantees about them. Topics include generalization bounds, implicit regularization, the theory of deep learning, spectral methods, and online learning and bandits problems. Prerequisites: A solid background in linear algebra (Math 104, Math 113 or CS205) and probability theory (CS109 or STAT 116), statistics and machine learning (STATS 315A, CS 229 or STATS 216).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 231: Statistical Learning Theory (CS 229T)

How do we formalize what it means for an algorithm to learn from data? How do we use mathematical thinking to design better machine learning methods? This course focuses on developing mathematical tools for answering these questions. We will present various learning algorithms and prove theoretical guarantees about them. Topics include generalization bounds, implicit regularization, the theory of deep learning, spectral methods, and online learning and bandits problems. Prerequisites: A solid background in linear algebra (Math 104, Math 113 or CS205) and probability theory (CS109 or STAT 116), statistics and machine learning (STATS 315A, CS 229 or STATS 216).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints