Print Settings
 

COMM 1B: Media, Culture, and Society (AMSTUD 1B)

The institutions and practices of mass media, including television, film, radio, and digital media, and their role in shaping culture and social life. The media's shifting relationships to politics, commerce, and identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 104W: Reporting, Writing, and Understanding the News

Techniques of news reporting and writing. The value and role of news in democratic societies. Gateway class to journalism. Prerequisite for all COMM 177/277 classes. Limited enrollment. Preference to COMM majors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 137W: The Dialogue of Democracy (AMSTUD 137, COMM 237, POLISCI 232T, POLISCI 332T)

All forms of democracy require some kind of communication so people can be aware of issues and make decisions. This course looks at competing visions of what democracy should be and different notions of the role of dialogue in a democracy. Is it just campaigning or does it include deliberation? Small scale discussions or sound bites on television? Or social media? What is the role of technology in changing our democratic practices, to mobilize, to persuade, to solve public problems? This course will include readings from political theory about democratic ideals - from the American founders to J.S. Mill and the Progressives to Joseph Schumpeter and modern writers skeptical of the public will. It will also include contemporary examinations of the media and the internet to see how those practices are changing and how the ideals can or cannot be realized.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 145: Personality and Digital Media (COMM 245)

Personality describes people's characteristic patterns of thinking, feeling, and behaving. This course will introduce students to the ways personality is expressed in digital devices (e.g., computers, smartphones) and platforms (e.g., social networks, virtual worlds). Readings and lectures will introduce students to theories of personality, the practice of assessing personality, and the broader societal implications of having mediated personalities. Course assignments will require students to apply the course concepts to explore personality expression in various digitally mediated contexts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 151: The First Amendment: Freedom of Speech and Press (COMM 251, POLISCI 125P)

Introduction to the constitutional protections for freedom of speech, press, and expressive association. All the major Supreme Court cases dealing with issues such as incitement, libel, hate speech, obscenity, commercial speech, and campaign finance. There are no prerequisites, but a basic understanding of American government would be useful. In addition to a final and midterm exam, students participate in a moot court on a hypothetical case. (Grad students register for COMM 251)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Persily, N. (PI); Orr, W. (TA)

COMM 154: The Politics of Algorithms (COMM 254, CSRE 154T, SOC 154)

Algorithms have become central actors in today's digital world. In areas as diverse as social media, journalism, education, healthcare, and policing, computing technologies increasingly mediate communication processes. This course will provide an introduction to the social and cultural forces shaping the construction, institutionalization, and uses of algorithms. In so doing, we will explore how algorithms relate to political issues of modernization, power, and inequality. Readings will range from social scientific analyses to media coverage of ongoing controversies relating to Big Data. Students will leave the course with a better appreciation of the broader challenges associated with researching, building, and using algorithms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 176: Advanced Digital Media Production (COMM 276)

In-depth reporting and production using audio, images and video. Focus on an in-depth journalism project with appropriate uses of digital media: audio, photography, graphics, and video. Topics include advanced field techniques and approaches (audio, video, still) and emphasis on creating a non-fiction narrative arc in a multimedia piece of 10-12 minutes. Prerequisite: COMM 275 or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Migielicz, G. (PI)

COMM 177D: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Narrative Journalism (COMM 277D)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277D.) How to report, write, edit, and read long-form narrative nonfiction, whether for magazines, news sites or online venues. Tools and templates of story telling such as scenes, characters, dialogue, and narrative arc. How the best long-form narrative stories defy or subvert conventional wisdom and bring fresh light to the human experience through reporting, writing, and moral passion. Prerequisite: 104 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brenner, R. (PI)

COMM 177I: Investigative Watchdog Reporting (COMM 277I)

Graduate students register for COMM 277I.) Learn how to apply an investigative and data mindset to journalism, from understanding how to background an individual or entity using online databases to compiling or combining disparate sets of information in ways that unveil wrongdoing or mismanagement. Focuses on mining texts, tracking associations, and using visualizations. Stories produced apply investigative techniques to beat reporting, breaking news, and long form journalism. Prerequisite: COMM 104W, or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 177T: Building News Applications (COMM 277T)

This course introduces students to the process of building interactive web applications and visualizations for the news. Students will study examples from the news industry and gain proficiency in a range of technical languages, skills and tools: version control, HTML, CSS, Javascript, Python, web protocols, and web hosting and deployment. Class exercises and projects will focus on the use of these technologies to produce applications that tell a story and engage the public. Students must have basic proficiency in Python, SQL and the Unix shell.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tumgoren, S. (PI)

COMM 195: Honors Thesis

Qualifies students to conduct communication research. Student must apply for department honors thesis program during Spring Quarter of junior year.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 199: Individual Work

For students with high academic standing. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 230: Digital Civil Society

Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS) and the Digital Civil Society Lab (DCSL). Quarter-long workshop for graduate students on the nature of civil society in the digital age. Civil society is a sphere of organizations and individuals operating for the public good, but independent from government or for-profit sectors. The digital age has expanded the potential for civil society participation, yet it also brings with it new challenges and threats. This course seeks to define, question, and trace the implications of `digital civil society,¿ through discussion of readings in this emerging field, peer-review of chapters and articles authored by course participants, and lectures by expert guest speakers. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of civil society in a digital age. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units. Open to advanced undergraduates by permission of the instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 237: The Dialogue of Democracy (AMSTUD 137, COMM 137W, POLISCI 232T, POLISCI 332T)

All forms of democracy require some kind of communication so people can be aware of issues and make decisions. This course looks at competing visions of what democracy should be and different notions of the role of dialogue in a democracy. Is it just campaigning or does it include deliberation? Small scale discussions or sound bites on television? Or social media? What is the role of technology in changing our democratic practices, to mobilize, to persuade, to solve public problems? This course will include readings from political theory about democratic ideals - from the American founders to J.S. Mill and the Progressives to Joseph Schumpeter and modern writers skeptical of the public will. It will also include contemporary examinations of the media and the internet to see how those practices are changing and how the ideals can or cannot be realized.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 245: Personality and Digital Media (COMM 145)

Personality describes people's characteristic patterns of thinking, feeling, and behaving. This course will introduce students to the ways personality is expressed in digital devices (e.g., computers, smartphones) and platforms (e.g., social networks, virtual worlds). Readings and lectures will introduce students to theories of personality, the practice of assessing personality, and the broader societal implications of having mediated personalities. Course assignments will require students to apply the course concepts to explore personality expression in various digitally mediated contexts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 251: The First Amendment: Freedom of Speech and Press (COMM 151, POLISCI 125P)

Introduction to the constitutional protections for freedom of speech, press, and expressive association. All the major Supreme Court cases dealing with issues such as incitement, libel, hate speech, obscenity, commercial speech, and campaign finance. There are no prerequisites, but a basic understanding of American government would be useful. In addition to a final and midterm exam, students participate in a moot court on a hypothetical case. (Grad students register for COMM 251)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Persily, N. (PI); Orr, W. (TA)

COMM 254: The Politics of Algorithms (COMM 154, CSRE 154T, SOC 154)

Algorithms have become central actors in today's digital world. In areas as diverse as social media, journalism, education, healthcare, and policing, computing technologies increasingly mediate communication processes. This course will provide an introduction to the social and cultural forces shaping the construction, institutionalization, and uses of algorithms. In so doing, we will explore how algorithms relate to political issues of modernization, power, and inequality. Readings will range from social scientific analyses to media coverage of ongoing controversies relating to Big Data. Students will leave the course with a better appreciation of the broader challenges associated with researching, building, and using algorithms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 276: Advanced Digital Media Production (COMM 176)

In-depth reporting and production using audio, images and video. Focus on an in-depth journalism project with appropriate uses of digital media: audio, photography, graphics, and video. Topics include advanced field techniques and approaches (audio, video, still) and emphasis on creating a non-fiction narrative arc in a multimedia piece of 10-12 minutes. Prerequisite: COMM 275 or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Migielicz, G. (PI)

COMM 277D: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Narrative Journalism (COMM 177D)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277D.) How to report, write, edit, and read long-form narrative nonfiction, whether for magazines, news sites or online venues. Tools and templates of story telling such as scenes, characters, dialogue, and narrative arc. How the best long-form narrative stories defy or subvert conventional wisdom and bring fresh light to the human experience through reporting, writing, and moral passion. Prerequisite: 104 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brenner, R. (PI)

COMM 277I: Investigative Watchdog Reporting (COMM 177I)

Graduate students register for COMM 277I.) Learn how to apply an investigative and data mindset to journalism, from understanding how to background an individual or entity using online databases to compiling or combining disparate sets of information in ways that unveil wrongdoing or mismanagement. Focuses on mining texts, tracking associations, and using visualizations. Stories produced apply investigative techniques to beat reporting, breaking news, and long form journalism. Prerequisite: COMM 104W, or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 277T: Building News Applications (COMM 177T)

This course introduces students to the process of building interactive web applications and visualizations for the news. Students will study examples from the news industry and gain proficiency in a range of technical languages, skills and tools: version control, HTML, CSS, Javascript, Python, web protocols, and web hosting and deployment. Class exercises and projects will focus on the use of these technologies to produce applications that tell a story and engage the public. Students must have basic proficiency in Python, SQL and the Unix shell.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tumgoren, S. (PI)

COMM 289P: Journalism Thesis

MA thesis course. Focuses on development of in-depth journalism project, culminating in work of publishable quality.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 290: Media Studies M.A. Project

Individual research for coterminal Media Studies students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 308: Graduate Seminar in Political Psychology

For students interested in research in political science, psychology, or communication. Methodological techniques for studying political attitudes and behaviors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 317: The Philosophy of Social Science

Approaches to social science research and their theoretical presuppositions. Readings from the philosophy of the social sciences. Research design, the role of experiments, and quantitative and qualitative research. Cases from communication and related social sciences. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fishkin, J. (PI)

COMM 318: Quantitative Social Science Research Methods

An introduction to a broad range of social science research methods that are widely used in PhD work. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 345: Personality Expression in Digitally Mediated Contexts

Digital devices (e.g., computers, smartphones, wearables) and platforms (e.g., social media sites, forums, virtual worlds) mediate much of our daily life. Each time we use digital media for communication, information seeking, or entertainment, we leave behind psychologically revealing digital footprints. In this course, we will explore how digital footprints can be used to understand individual differences in thinking, feeling, and behaving. Class activities and assignments will require students to apply the concepts to their own research projects. Course enrollment limited to PhD-level students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Harari, G. (PI)

COMM 380: Curriculum Practical Training

Practical experience in the communication industries. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Meets requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 386: Media Cultures of the Cold War (ARTHIST 475)

The intersection of politics, aesthetics, and new media technologies in the U.S. between the end of WW II and the fall of the Berlin Wall. Topics include the aesthetics of thinking the unthinkable in the wake of the atom bomb; abstract expressionism and 'modern man' discourse; game theory, cybernetics, and new models of art making; the rise of television, intermedia, and the counterculture; and the continuing influence of the early cold war on contemporary media aesthetics. Readings from primary and secondary sources in art history, communication, and critical theory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Turner, F. (PI)

COMM 390: Communication Colloquium

The Communication Colloquium is a monthly seminar held throughout the academic year, in which leading scholars present their research findings. The Colloquium is intended for PhD students in Communication, and priority will be given to COMM PhD students. Attendance of all sessions is required to receive credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 397: Minor Research Project

Individual research for Ph.D. candidates. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 398: Major Research Project

Individual research for Ph.D. candidates.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

COMM 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints