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COMM 1: Introduction to Communication

Our world is being transformed by media technologies that change how we interact with one another and perceived the world around us. These changes are all rooted in communication practices, and their consequences touch on almost all aspects of life. In COMM 1 we will examine the effects of media technologies on psychological life, on industry, and on communities local and global through theorizing and demonstrations and critiques of a wide range of communication products and services.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hancock, J. (PI)

COMM 104W: Reporting, Writing, and Understanding the News

Techniques of news reporting and writing. The value and role of news in democratic societies. Gateway class to journalism. Prerequisite for all COMM 177/277 classes. Limited enrollment. Preference to COMM majors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 108: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 208)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Harari, G. (PI)

COMM 125: Perspectives on American Journalism (AMSTUD 125, COMM 225)

An examination of American journalism, focusing on how news is produced, distributed, and financially supported. Emphasis on current media controversies and puzzles, and on designing innovations in discovering and telling stories. (Graduate students register for COMM 225.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hamilton, J. (PI)

COMM 154: The Politics of Algorithms (COMM 254, CSRE 154T, SOC 154, SOC 254C)

Algorithms have become central actors in today's digital world. In areas as diverse as social media, journalism, education, healthcare, and policing, computing technologies increasingly mediate communication processes. This course will provide an introduction to the social and cultural forces shaping the construction, institutionalization, and uses of algorithms. In so doing, we will explore how algorithms relate to political issues of modernization, power, and inequality. Readings will range from social scientific analyses to media coverage of ongoing controversies relating to Big Data. Students will leave the course with a better appreciation of the broader challenges associated with researching, building, and using algorithms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Christin, A. (PI)

COMM 166: Virtual People (COMM 266)

(Graduate students register for COMM 266.) The concept of virtual people or digital human representations; methods of constructing and using virtual people; methodological approaches to interactions with and among virtual people; and current applications. Viewpoints including popular culture, literature, film, engineering, behavioral science, computer science, and communication.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bailenson, J. (PI)

COMM 177B: BigLocal Journalism: a project-based class (COMM 277B)

This class will tackle data-driven journalism, in collaboration with other academic and journalistic partners.nThe class is centered around one or more projects rooted in local data-driven journalism but with potential for regional or national journalistic stories and impact. Students work in interdisciplinary teams to negotiate for public records and data, analyze data and report out stories. Some of the work may be published by news organizations or may be used to advance data journalism projects focused on public accountability. Students will gain valuable knowledge and skills in how to negotiate for public records, how to critically analyze data for journalistic purpose and build out reporting and writing skills. Students with a background in journalism (especially data journalism), statistics, computer science, law, or public policy are encouraged to participate. Enrollment is limited. Prerequisite: consent of instructor . May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 195: Honors Thesis

Qualifies students to conduct communication research. Student must apply for department honors thesis program during Spring Quarter of junior year.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 199: Individual Work

For students with high academic standing. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 208: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 108)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Harari, G. (PI)

COMM 225: Perspectives on American Journalism (AMSTUD 125, COMM 125)

An examination of American journalism, focusing on how news is produced, distributed, and financially supported. Emphasis on current media controversies and puzzles, and on designing innovations in discovering and telling stories. (Graduate students register for COMM 225.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hamilton, J. (PI)

COMM 230A: Digital Civil Society

Digital technologies have fundamentally changed how people come together to make change in the world, a sphere of action commonly called 'civil society'. How did this happen, what's being done about it, and what does it mean for democratic governance and collective action in the future? This course analyzes the opportunities and challenges technology presents to associational life, free expression, individual privacy, and collective action. Year-long seminar sequence for advanced undergraduates or master's students. Each quarter may be taken independently. Fall Quarter focuses on the emergence of digital technologies in the 1990's. Topics include popular adoption of the internet, development of international networks, creation of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Internet Archive, emergence of the digital economy, the dot com bubble, key pieces of technology legislation, and legal battles over free expression.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 230X: Digital Civil Society +1 Series

Speaker series examining the history, theory, legal challenges, policy frameworks and economic choices that have shaped digital networks and technologies, and how those technologies have in turn changed the nature and role of civil society in democracies. Required component of the Comm230 - Digital Civil Society; also open to enrollment by other students and to the public.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 254: The Politics of Algorithms (COMM 154, CSRE 154T, SOC 154, SOC 254C)

Algorithms have become central actors in today's digital world. In areas as diverse as social media, journalism, education, healthcare, and policing, computing technologies increasingly mediate communication processes. This course will provide an introduction to the social and cultural forces shaping the construction, institutionalization, and uses of algorithms. In so doing, we will explore how algorithms relate to political issues of modernization, power, and inequality. Readings will range from social scientific analyses to media coverage of ongoing controversies relating to Big Data. Students will leave the course with a better appreciation of the broader challenges associated with researching, building, and using algorithms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Christin, A. (PI)

COMM 266: Virtual People (COMM 166)

(Graduate students register for COMM 266.) The concept of virtual people or digital human representations; methods of constructing and using virtual people; methodological approaches to interactions with and among virtual people; and current applications. Viewpoints including popular culture, literature, film, engineering, behavioral science, computer science, and communication.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bailenson, J. (PI)

COMM 273D: Public Affairs Data Journalism I

Even before the ubiquity of Internet access and high-powered computers, public accountability reporting relied on the concerted collection of observations and analytical problem-solving. We study the methods, and the data, used to discover leads and conduct in-depth reporting on public affairs, including election finance and safety regulations. Students gain practical experience with the digital tools and techniques of computer-assisted reporting. Prerequisite: Only open to Journalism M.A. students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tumgoren, S. (PI)

COMM 275: Multimedia Storytelling: Reporting and Production Using Audio, Still Images, and Video

Multimedia assignments coordinated with deadline reporting efforts in COMM 273 from traditional news beats using audio, still photography, and video. Use of digital audio recorders and audio production to leverage voice-over narration, interviews, and natural sound; use of digital still cameras and audio to produce audio slideshows; and the combination of these media with video in post-production with Final Cut Pro. Prerequisite: Only open to Journalism M.A. students. Corequisite: COMM 273.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Migielicz, G. (PI)

COMM 277B: BigLocal Journalism: a project-based class (COMM 177B)

This class will tackle data-driven journalism, in collaboration with other academic and journalistic partners.nThe class is centered around one or more projects rooted in local data-driven journalism but with potential for regional or national journalistic stories and impact. Students work in interdisciplinary teams to negotiate for public records and data, analyze data and report out stories. Some of the work may be published by news organizations or may be used to advance data journalism projects focused on public accountability. Students will gain valuable knowledge and skills in how to negotiate for public records, how to critically analyze data for journalistic purpose and build out reporting and writing skills. Students with a background in journalism (especially data journalism), statistics, computer science, law, or public policy are encouraged to participate. Enrollment is limited. Prerequisite: consent of instructor . May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 279: News Reporting & Writing Fundamentals

Learn beat reporting and writing skills including source development, interviewing, and story structure for news and features. Emphasis on developing news judgment, clear writing skills, and an ability to execute stories on deadline. Exercises and assignments mimic a newsroom. Students pursue local beats with a focus on public issues and complement written pieces with relevant data analyses and multimedia components. Prerequisite: Only open to Journalism M.A. students. Corequisite: COMM 275.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zacharia, J. (PI)

COMM 281: Exploring Computational Journalism (CS 206)

This project-based course will explore the field of computational journalism, including the use of Data Science, Info Visualization, AI, and emerging technologies to help journalists discover and tell stories, understand their audience, advance free speech, and build trust. Admission by application; please email R.B. Brenner at rbbrenner@stanford.edu to request application.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 290: Media Studies M.A. Project

Individual research for coterminal Media Studies students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 301: Communication Research, Curriculum Development and Pedagogy

Designed to prepare students for teaching and research in the Department of Communication. Students will be trained in developing curriculum and in pedagogical practices, and will also be exposed to the research programs of various faculty members in the department. Required of all Ph.D. students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bailenson, J. (PI)

COMM 308: Graduate Seminar in Political Psychology

For students interested in research in political science, psychology, or communication. Methodological techniques for studying political attitudes and behaviors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 311: Theory of Communication

Basic communication theory for first-year Ph.D. students in the Department of Communication. Introduction to basic writings and concepts in communication research. The goal is an introduction to issues in the field that are common in communication research. First half of the class will emphasize classic literature about field organization, history and theory. Second half will emphasize contemporary theory in areas that students select.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Reeves, B. (PI)

COMM 314: Ethnographic Methods (SOC 319)

This course offers an introduction to the practice and politics of ethnographic fieldwork. It provides a "how to" of ethnographic research, in which students will conduct an ethnographic project of their own, complemented by weekly readings and discussions. In the process, we will discuss the theory and epistemology of fieldwork, along with the practicalities and politics of fieldwork in different domains. We will examine different stages of ethnographic research (entering the field, conducting and recording fieldwork, exiting the field and writing it up), different methods (observations, interviews, "going along"), as well as distinct styles of ethnographic work (virtual ethnography, organizational ethnography, narrative ethnography, etc.). The course will serve as a participative workshop for students to exchange field notes, share practical advice, and consolidate their research interests. Prerequisite: Must be Communication student, or obtain approval from instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Christin, A. (PI)

COMM 322: Advanced Studies in Behavior and Social Media

This course will focus on advanced research on social media with an emphasis on interpersonal dynamics. The course will emphasize key theories from psychology and communication that bear on behavior and social media. Students will develop a research project in the course that draws on one of the primary methods from the social media space.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hancock, J. (PI)

COMM 326: Advanced Topics in Human Virtual Representation

Topics include the theoretical construct of person identity, the evolution of that construct given the advent of virtual environments, and methodological approaches to understanding virtual human representation. Prerequisite: PhD student or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bailenson, J. (PI)

COMM 339: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (POLISCI 421K, PSYCH 231)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 380: Curriculum Practical Training

Practical experience in the communication industries. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Meets requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 390: Communication Colloquium

The Communication Colloquium is a monthly seminar held throughout the academic year, in which leading scholars present their research findings. The Colloquium is intended for PhD students in Communication, and priority will be given to COMM PhD students. Attendance of all sessions is required to receive credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 397: Minor Research Project

Individual research for Ph.D. candidates. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 398: Major Research Project

Individual research for Ph.D. candidates.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

COMM 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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