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CLASSICS 1G: Beginning Greek

No knowledge of Greek is assumed. Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ten-Hove, L. (PI)

CLASSICS 1L: Beginning Latin

(Formerly CLASSLAT 1.) Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language. No previous knowledge of Latin is assumed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Klopacz, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 9N: What Didn't Make It into the Bible (JEWISHST 4, RELIGST 4)

Over two billion people alive today consider the Bible to be sacred scripture. But how did the books that made it into the bible get there in the first place? Who decided what was to be part of the bible and what wasn't? How would history look differently if a given book didn't make the final cut and another one did? Hundreds of ancient Jewish and Christian texts are not included in the Bible. "What Didn't Make It in the Bible" focuses on these excluded writings. We will explore the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse ancient romance novels, explore the adventures of fallen angels who sired giants (and taught humans about cosmetics), tour heaven and hell, encounter the garden of Eden story told from the perspective of the snake, and learn how the world will end. The course assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history. It is designed for students who are part of faith traditions that consider the bible to be sacred, as well as those who are not. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring books, groups, and ideas that eventually lost the battles of history and to keep asking the question "why." In critically examining these ancient narratives and the communities that wrote them, you will investigate how religions canonize a scriptural tradition, better appreciate the diversity of early Judaism and Christianity, understand the historical context of these religions, and explore the politics behind what did and did not make it into the bible.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Penn, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 11G: Intermediate Greek: Prose

Transition to reading Greek prose through focusing on a range of mythological topics. Students will build upon knowledge of morphology and syntax acquired in beginning Greek and develop confidence and proficiency in reading Greek texts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wilker, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 11L: Intermediate Latin: Introduction to Literature

Phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax. Readings in prose and poetry. Analysis of literary language, including rhythm, meter, word order, narrative, and figures of speech.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Klopacz, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 12N: Income and wealth inequality from the Stone Age to the present (HISTORY 12N)

Rising inequality is a defining feature of our time. How long has economic inequality existed, and when, how and why has the gap between haves and have-nots widened or narrowed over the course of history? This seminar takes a very long-term view of these questions. It is designed to help you appreciate dynamics and complexities that are often obscured by partisan controversies and short-term perspectives, and to provide solid historical background for a better understanding of a growing societal concern.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Scheidel, W. (PI)

CLASSICS 17N: To Die For: Antigone and Political Dissent (TAPS 12N)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 6N.) Preference to freshmen. Tensions inherent in the democracy of ancient Athens; how the character of Antigone emerges in later drama, film, and political thought as a figure of resistance against illegitimate authority; and her relevance to contemporary struggles for women's and workers' rights and national liberation. Readings and screenings include versions of Antigone by Sophocles, Anouilh, Brecht, Fugard/Kani/Ntshona, Paulin, Glowacki, Gurney, and von Trotta.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rehm, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 31: Greek Mythology

The heroic and divine in the literature, mythology, and culture of archaic Greece. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of individuals and society. Illustrated lectures. Readings in translation of Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, and the poets of lyric and tragedy. nWeekly participation in a discussion section is required during regular academic quarters (Aut, Win, Spr)
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 37: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, The Ancient World (DLCL 11, HUMCORE 11)

This course will journey through ancient literature from Homer to St. Augustine; it will introduce participants to some of its fascinating features and big ideas; and it will reflect on questions such as: What is a good life, a good society? Who is in and who is out and why? What is the meaning of honor, and should it be embraced or feared? Where does human subjectivity fit into a world of matter, cause and effect? When is rebellion justified? What happens when a way of life or thought is upended? Do we have any duties to the past? N.B. This is the first of three courses in the European track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study European history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future. Students who take HUMCORE 11 and HUMCORE 12Q will have preferential admission to HUMCORE 13Q (a WR2 seminar).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 39: Reinventing the Sophomore Experience

The sophomore year brings a number of choices that undergraduates have to make. This course is a chance to explore those choices thoughtfully, without resorting to negative clichés ('sophomore slump'). Students will diagnose and discuss the issues at stake, including academic plans, campus life, work-life balance, longer-term life goals. The challenges and opportunities of leadership is an important theme, both in an abstract sense and practically: students will, in the course of the autumn term, design an event which will be held in the winter or spring term. This residentially-based course is aimed at students who have preassigned to Toyon's RISE program, Reinventing the Sophomore Experience. One unit only. Letter-grade only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Catsalis, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 40: Greek Philosophy (PHIL 100)

We shall cover the major developments in Greek philosophical thought, focusing on Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic schools (the Epicureans, the Stoics, and the Skeptics). Topics include epistemology, metaphysics, psychology, ethics and political theory. No prereqs, not repeatable.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bobonich, C. (PI)

CLASSICS 76: Global History: The Ancient World (HISTORY 1A)

This course examines the emergence of "world empires"-- the first way of constituting a world-- in four regions of the eastern hemisphere from the first millennium BCE to the year 900 CE. It will study the pivotal role of cities, the importance of rulers, the incorporation of diverse peoples, and how the states that followed their collapse constituted new world orders through combining imitation of the vanished empire with the elaboration of the new "world religions."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI); Nunez, A. (TA)

CLASSICS 81: Ancient Empires: Near East (HISTORY 117)

Why do imperialists conquer people? Why do some people resist while others collaborate? This course tries to answer these questions by looking at some of the world's earliest empires. The main focus is on the expansion of the Assyrian and Persian Empires between 900 and 300 BC and the consequences for the ancient Jews, Egyptians, and Greeks. The main readings come from the Bible, Herodotus, and Assyrian and Persian royal inscriptions, and the course combines historical and archaeological data with social scientific approaches. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 101G: Advanced Greek: Plato

Selections from Plato's Symposium. Review of Greek grammar and syntax with a view to transitioning students from Intermediate Greek to fluent reading of Attic prose. Special attention as well to 5th-century BC political and social context, history of Greek rhetoric, and introduction to Plato's philosophical system. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walsh, V. (PI)

CLASSICS 101L: Advanced Latin: Comedy

Classics majors and minors must take for a letter grade and may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bork, H. (PI)

CLASSICS 104A: Latin Syntax (CLASSICS 204A)

Intensive review of Latin syntax. Begins Autumn Quarter and continues through the fifth week of Winter Quarter. See CLASSICS 206A/B for supplemental courses. Students should take both syntax and semantics in the same quarters. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Latin. First-year graduate students register for CLASSICS 204A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 151: Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design (ARCHLGY 151)

Connections among science, technology, society and culture by examining the design of a prehistoric hand axe, Egyptian pyramid, ancient Greek perfume jar, medieval castle, Wedgewood teapot, Edison's electric light bulb, computer mouse, Sony Walkman, supersonic aircraft, and BMW Mini. Interdisciplinary perspectives include archaeology, cultural anthropology, science studies, history and sociology of technology, cognitive science, and evolutionary psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 161: Introduction to Greek Art I: The Archaic Period (ARTHIST 101)

This lecture course explores Greek art and culture from 1000-480. In the beginning archaic art forms are more abstract than life-like, closer to Calder than Michelangelo. While Homer describes the rippling muscles (and egos) of his heroes, vase-painters and sculptors prefer abstraction. This changes in the 7th C. as a result of commerce with the Near East and Egypt. Imported Near Eastern bronzes and ivories awaken the Greeks to a wider range of subjects, techniques and ambitions. Later in the century, Greeks in Egypt learn to carve hard stone from Egyptian masters. Throughout the 6th C. Greek artists assimilate what they had borrowed, compete with one another, defy their teachers, test the tolerance of the gods and eventually produce works of art that speak with a Greek accent. When the Persians invade the Acropolis in 480, they find artifacts with little trace of alien influence or imprint - omens of the defiant Greek military that would prevail at Salamis and Plataea.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 163: Artists, Athletes, Courtesans and Crooks (ARTHIST 203)

The seminar covers a range of topics devoted to the makers of Greek art and artifacts, the ancient Greeks who used them in life and the afterlife, and the miscreants - from Lord Elgin to contemporary tomb-looters and dealers- whose deeds have damaged, deracinated and desecrated temples, sculptures and grave goods. Readings include ancient texts in translation, books and articles by eloquent experts, legal texts and lively page-turners. Classes meet in the seminar room and the Cantor Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 194: Greece and Rome: A new model of antiquity (CLASSICS 394)

Join archaeologist Michael Shanks in a tour through more than a thousand years of history, 700 BCE to 450 CE, debunking a host of myths and misconceptions about Graeco-Roman antiquity and offering a fresh view of what was driving the motor of ancient history. Drawing on new approaches that have hardly escaped academic journals and seminar rooms, we will avoid the plot of the well-worn stories and focus on the way the ancient world worked around the key concern of membership ¿ who belonged to civic community and who didn¿t, on what grounds, and with what consequences. The class will take you back to the origins of city life in the Near East, to the princely societies of Bronze Age Europe to show how the scene was set for the success of the city states of the Mediterranean, and how important it is to maintain a big perspective on Greece and Rome. Not afraid to offer critique of orthodoxy, we will share alternative views of familiar and unfamiliar features of antiquity, in the arts and culture, the likes of poetry and portraiture, philosophy and religious institutions, and in politics, including misunderstandings of Athenian democracy and Roman military might. You will come away from the class with a new view of antiquity and why we should still be fascinated by its relevance to today. Advanced undergraduates are welcome to register.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Shanks, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 198: Directed Readings (Undergraduate)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 160.) May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 199: Undergraduate Thesis: Senior Research

(Formerly CLASSGEN 199.) May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 200G: Special Topics in Survey of Greek Literature

Reading course focusing on historical, ethnographic, and biographical texts in Greek. Focus is on translation, understanding contexts, genres, and historical significance. This course will focus on the role of the funeral oration in constructing the images and ideologies of Classical Athens. We will read the funeral orations of Gorgias, Thucydides, Plato, Lysias, and Demosthenes in Greek, as well as related inscriptions from the Athenian Agora. A key secondary source for our inquiry is Nicole Loraux's The Invention of Athens: The Funeral Oration in the Classical City.nClassics graduates: Special Topics courses do not count for seminar credit. Archaeology and History tracks may elect one or more of these courses in lieu of a quarter or quarters of the same language Survey. Literature and Philosophy tracks cannot substitute Special Topics courses for Survey.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tennant, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 201G: Survey of Greek Literature: Archaic Greek

Required two-year sequence focusing on the origins, development, and interaction of Greek and Latin literature, history, and philosophy. Greek and Latin material taught in alternate years.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Martin, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 204A: Latin Syntax (CLASSICS 104A)

Intensive review of Latin syntax. Begins Autumn Quarter and continues through the fifth week of Winter Quarter. See CLASSICS 206A/B for supplemental courses. Students should take both syntax and semantics in the same quarters. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Latin. First-year graduate students register for CLASSICS 204A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 206A: The Semantics of Grammar

206A: Tense, Aspect, Argument Structure, Location. 206B: Quantification, Plurality, Modification, Negation, Modality. Supplements CLASSICS 104A/204A. Students should take both syntax and semantics in the same quarters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 220: Pedagogy Workshop for Language Teaching

The primary goal of the course is to prepare students to teach elementary and secondary languages, both at Stanford and at other institutions. Much of the pedagogical material discussed will be applicable to other kinds of Classics teaching, but language instruction will be the focus. Secondary goals are to prepare students for pedagogy-related questions as they enter the job market, and to introduce pedagogy-facing career options. Course discussions will range broadly from ethical and philosophical questions about pedagogy to practical and logistical issues specific to graduate teaching. Readings, class visits, and in-class demonstrations will inform meeting discussions. The only requirement for enrolled students is full and engaged participation each week.This course is intended for Classics PhD students only.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bork, H. (PI)

CLASSICS 298: Directed Reading in Classics (Graduate Students)

This course is offered for students requiring specialized training in an area not covered by existing courses. To register, a student must obtain permission from the Classics Department and the faculty member who is willing to supervise the reading. This course can be repeated for credit, not to exceed 20 units total.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 327: Petronius and Apuleius

Petronius' Satyricon and Apuleius' Metamorphoses represent the surviving Latin novel. Differences between them. Readings include Petronius' dinner at Trimalchio's and Apuleius' love story of Cupid and Psyche. Philological analysis, history of the novel, and social history of the Roman empire. The afterlife of these texts. Recent scholarship.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Parker, G. (PI)

CLASSICS 385: ANCIENT STATE FORMATION

In this seminar, we examine the rise, development, and transformation of political offices in ancient societies. We focus on the Greek and Roman worlds in the millennium between 700 BC and AD 300, but also range more broadly in time and space. We ask what drove the concentration and dispersal of political power and how distinctive Greek and Roman forms of the state were. The course combines archaeological, literary, and comparative evidence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 394: Greece and Rome: A new model of antiquity (CLASSICS 194)

Join archaeologist Michael Shanks in a tour through more than a thousand years of history, 700 BCE to 450 CE, debunking a host of myths and misconceptions about Graeco-Roman antiquity and offering a fresh view of what was driving the motor of ancient history. Drawing on new approaches that have hardly escaped academic journals and seminar rooms, we will avoid the plot of the well-worn stories and focus on the way the ancient world worked around the key concern of membership ¿ who belonged to civic community and who didn¿t, on what grounds, and with what consequences. The class will take you back to the origins of city life in the Near East, to the princely societies of Bronze Age Europe to show how the scene was set for the success of the city states of the Mediterranean, and how important it is to maintain a big perspective on Greece and Rome. Not afraid to offer critique of orthodoxy, we will share alternative views of familiar and unfamiliar features of antiquity, in the arts and culture, the likes of poetry and portraiture, philosophy and religious institutions, and in politics, including misunderstandings of Athenian democracy and Roman military might. You will come away from the class with a new view of antiquity and why we should still be fascinated by its relevance to today. Advanced undergraduates are welcome to register.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Shanks, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 399: Dissertation Research in Classics

This course is elected once a student is ready to begin research for the dissertation, usually shortly after admission to candidacy. To register, a student must obtain permission from the faculty member who is willing to supervise the research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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