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CHEM 29N: Chemistry in the Kitchen

This course examines the chemistry relevant to food and drink preparation, both in homes and in restaurants, which makes what we consume more pleasurable. Good cooking is more often considered an art rather than a science, but a small bit of understanding goes a long way to make the preparation and consumption of food and drink more enjoyable. The intention is to have demonstrations and tastings as a part of every class meeting. We will examine some rather familiar items in this course: eggs, dairy products, meats, breads, vegetables, pastries, and carbonated beverages. We shall playfully explore the chemistry that turns food into meals. A high-school chemistry background is assumed; bring to class a good appetite and a healthy curiosity.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zare, R. (PI)

CHEM 31B: Chemical Principles II

Chem 31B is the second course in this two-quarter sequence, therefore only students who have completed Chem 31A may enroll in 31B. As with 31A, students will continue to engage in group problem-solving activities throughout class and participate in weekly laboratory activities. Labs and write-ups will allow students to more deeply explore and observe the different facets of chemical reactivity, including rates (kinetics), energetics (thermodynamics), and reversibility (equilibrium) of reactions. Through experimentation and discussion, students will determine what forces influence the rate of chemical reactions and learn how this can be applied to enzyme reactivity. Students will quantify chemical concentrations during a reaction, and predict the direction in which a reaction will shift in order to achieve equilibrium, including solubility equilibria. They will use these methods to estimate the possible levels of lead and other toxic metals in drinking water. Special emphasis will be placed on acid/base equilibria , allowing students to explore the role of buffers and antacids in our bodies, as well as ocean acidification and the impact on coral reefs. Students will then bring together concepts from both kinetics and equilibrium, in a deeper discussion of thermodynamics, to understand what ultimately influences the spontaneity of a reaction. Students will build a relationship between free energy, temperature, and equilibrium constants to be able to calculate the free energy of a reaction and understand how processes in our body are coupled to harness excess free energy to do useful work. Finally we will explore how we harness work from redox reactions, building both voltaic cells (i.e. batteries) and electrolytic cells in lab, and using reduction potentials to predict spontaneity and potential of a given reaction. We will look at the applications of redox chemistry in electric and fuel cell vehicles. The course's particular emphasis on understanding the driving forces of a reaction, especially the influence thermodynamics versus kinetics, will prepare students for further study of predicting organic chemical reactivity and equilibria from structure in Chem 33. Prerequisite: Chem 31A.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 31BC: Problem Solving in Science

Development and practice of critical problem solving skills using chemical examples. Limited enrollment and with permission of the instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 31B.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 33: Structure and Reactivity of Organic Molecules

An introduction to organic chemistry, the molecular foundation to understanding of life, energy, and material science. Students will learn structural and bonding models of organic molecules that provide insights into chemical, physical, and reactivity properties, in addition to their biological activities. Combining these models with kinetic and thermodynamic analyses allows molecular interconversions to be rationalized. Translation of this knowledge to more complex systems empowers the synthesis of novel molecules or materials that can positively impact our society and environment. A two-hour weekly lab section accompanies the course to introduce the techniques of separation and identification of organic compounds. Pre-requisite: CHEM 31A and 31B, or CHEM 31M, or CHEM 31X, or AP Chemistry score of 5.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 90: Directed Instruction/Reading

(Formerly Chem 110) Undergraduates pursue a reading program under supervision of a faculty member in Chemistry; may also involve participation in lab. Prerequisites: superior work in CHEM 31A, 31B, 31M, 31X, or 33; and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 91: Exploring Chemical Research at Stanford

(Formerly 111) Preference to freshmen and sophomores. Department faculty describe their cutting-edge research and its applications.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dassama, L. (PI)

CHEM 126: Synthesis Laboratory

(Formerly 132) This is a laboratory course that will provide a true experience of what it is like to perform research in synthetic organic chemistry. Emphasis will be on proper reaction setup, reaction monitoring, and complete characterization of final products using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Students will be utilizing modern electronic notebooks to prepare for and document their experiments. Concludes with an individual synthesis project. Prerequisites: Chem 124 (formerly Chem 130).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burns, N. (PI)

CHEM 141: The Chemical Principles of Life I

This is the first course in a two-quarter sequence (Chem 141/143), which will examine biological science through the lens of chemistry. In this sequence students will gain a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the molecular logic of cellular processes, which include expression and transmission of the genetic code, enzyme kinetics, biosynthesis, energy storage and consumption, membrane transport, and signal transduction. Connections to foundational principles of chemistry will be made through structure-function analyses of biological molecules. Integrated lessons in structural, mechanistic, and physical chemistry will underscore how molecular science and molecular innovation have impacted biology and medicine. Prerequisites: CHEM 121 (formerly 35), MATH 21 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cox, C. (PI); Du Bois, J. (PI)

CHEM 151: Inorganic Chemistry I

Bonding, stereochemical, and symmetry properties of discrete inorganic molecules are covered along with their mechanisms of ligand and electron exchange. Density function calculations are extensively used in these analyses in computer and problem set exercises. Prerequisites: CHEM 121 (formerly CHEM 35).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stack, D. (PI)

CHEM 175: Physical Chemistry III

Molecular theory of kinetics and statistical mechanics: transport and reactions in gases and liquids, ensembles and the Boltzmann distribution law, partition functions, molecular simulation, structure and dynamics of liquids. Diffusion and activation limited reactions, potential energy surfaces, collision theory and transition-state theory. Prerequisites: CHEM 171, CHEM 173.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Markland, T. (PI)

CHEM 176: Spectroscopy Laboratory

Use of spectroscopic instrumentation to obtain familiarity with important types of spectrometers and spectroscopic method and to apply them to study molecular properties and physical chemical time-dependent processes. Spectrometers include electronic ultraviolet/visible absorption, fluorescence, Raman, Fourier transform infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Prerequisite: CHEM 173.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fayer, M. (PI)

CHEM 183: Biochemistry II (CHEMENG 183, CHEMENG 283)

Focus on metabolic biochemistry: the study of chemical reactions that provide the cell with the energy and raw materials necessary for life. Topics include glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, photosynthesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the metabolism of glycogen, fatty acids, amino acids, and nucleotides as well as the macromolecular machines that synthesize RNA, DNA, and proteins. Medical relevance is emphasized throughout. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 181 or CHEM 143 or CHEMENG 181/281.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dunn, A. (PI)

CHEM 190: Advanced Undergraduate Research

Limited to undergraduates who have completed Chem 121 (formerly 35) and/or Chem 134, or by special arrangement with a faculty member. May be repeated 8 times for a max of 27 units. Prerequisite: CHEM 121 (formerly 35) or 134. Corequisite: CHEM 300.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 193: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Human Health Research (BIO 193, BIOE 193, CHEMENG 193)

For undergraduate students participating in the Stanford ChEM-H Undergraduate Scholars Program. This course will expose students to interdisciplinary research questions and approaches that span chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Focus is on the development and practice of scientific reading, writing, and presentation skills intended to complement hands-on laboratory research. Students will read scientific articles, write research proposals, make posters, and give presentations.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alfieri, K. (PI)

CHEM 200: Research and Special Advanced Work

Qualified graduate students undertake research or advanced lab work not covered by listed courses under the direction of a member of the teaching staff.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 211A: Research Progress in Chemistry

Required of all second year Ph.D. students. Students present their research progress and plans in brief written and oral summaries.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Solomon, E. (PI)

CHEM 211B: Chemistry Research Seminar Presentation

Required of all third year Ph.D. students. Students present their research project as a seminar.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 211C: Chemistry Research Proposal

Required of all fourth year Ph.D. students. Students formulate, write, and orally defend an original research proposal.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 223: Advanced Organic Chemistry II

Physical Organic Chemistry. This course is focused on understanding the important physical principles in organic chemistry, including bonding and structural analysis; molecular interactions; thermodynamics; kinetics; methods to investigate reactive intermediates, reactivity, and elucidate reaction mechanism. Prerequisite: Chem 123 (formerly 131).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Xia, Y. (PI)

CHEM 251: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

(Formerly Chem 253) Electronic structure and physical properties of transition metal complexes. Ligand field and molecular orbital theories, magnetism and magnetic susceptibility, electron paramagnetic resonance including hyperfine interactions and zero field splitting and electronic absorption spectroscopy including vibrational interactions. Prerequisite: advanced undergrad-level inorganic course (equivalent to CHEM 153).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Solomon, E. (PI)

CHEM 258C: Research Progress in Inorganic Chemistry

Required of all second-, third-, and fourth-year Ph.D. candidates in inorganic chemistry. Students present their research progress in written and oral forms (A); present a seminar in the literature of the field of research (B); and formulate, write, and orally defend a research proposal (C). Second-year students register for A; third-year students register for B; fourth-year students register for C.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Solomon, E. (PI)

CHEM 273: Advanced Physical Chemistry

Statistical mechanics is a fundamental bridge that links microscopic world of quantum mechanics to macroscopic thermodynamic properties. We discuss the principles and methods of statistical mechanics from the ensemble point of view. Applications include statistical thermodynamics, quantum systems, heat capacities of gases and solids, chemical equilibrium, pair correlation functions in liquids, and phase transitions. Prerequisite: CHEM 271.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cui, B. (PI)

CHEM 277: Materials Chemistry and Physics

Topics: structures and symmetries and of solid state crystalline materials, chemical applications of group theory in solids, quantum mechanical electronic band structures of solids, phonons in solids, synthesis methods and characterization techniques for solids including nanostructured materials, selected applications of solid state materials and nanostructures. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dai, H. (PI)

CHEM 278B: Research Progress in Physical Chemistry

Required of all second- and third-year Ph.D. candidates in physical and biophysical chemistry and chemical physics. Second-year students present their research progress and plans in brief written and oral summaries (A); third-year students prepare a written progress report (B). A: Win, B: Win
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cui, B. (PI)

CHEM 281: Therapeutic Science at the Chemistry - Biology Interface

(Formerly Chem 227) Explores the design and enablement of new medicines that were born from a convergence of concepts and techniques from chemistry and biology. Topics include an overview of the drug development process, design of of small molecule medicines with various modes of action, drug metabolism and pharmacogenomics, biologic medicines including protein- and nucleic acid-based therapeutics, glycoscience and glycomimetic drugs, and cell-based medicines derived from synthetic biology. Prerequisite: undergraduate level organic chemistry and biochemistry as well as familiarity with concepts in cell and molecular biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bertozzi, C. (PI)

CHEM 299: Teaching of Chemistry

Required of all teaching assistants in Chemistry. Techniques of teaching chemistry by means of lectures and labs.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 300: Department Colloquium

Required of graduate students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bertozzi, C. (PI)

CHEM 301: Research in Chemistry

Required of graduate students who have passed the qualifying examination. Open to qualified graduate students with the consent of the major professor. Research seminars and directed reading deal with newly developing areas in chemistry and experimental techniques. May be repeated for credit. Search for adviser name on Axess.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 329: Organic Chemistry Seminar

(Formerly 229) Required of graduate students majoring in organic chemistry. Students giving seminars register for CHEM 231.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bertozzi, C. (PI)

CHEM 359: Inorganic Chemistry Seminar

(Formerly 259) Required of graduate students majoring in inorganic chemistry.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Solomon, E. (PI)

CHEM 379: Physical Chemistry Seminar

(Formerly 279) Required of graduate students majoring in physical chemistry. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Markland, T. (PI)

CHEM 390: Curricular Practical Training for Chemists

For Chemistry majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Confer with Chem student services office for signup.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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