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CHEM 10: Exploring Research and Problem Solving Across the Sciences

Development and practice of critical problem solving and study skills using a wide variety of scientific examples that illustrate the broad yet integrated nature of current research. Students will build a problem solving tool-kit and apply chemical and mathematical concepts to solve problems related to energy, climate change, water resources, medicine, and food & nutrition. Note: course offered in August prior to start of fall quarter, and only Leland Scholar Program participants will register.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 25N: Science in the News

Preference to freshmen. Possible topics include: diseases such as avian flu, HIV, and malaria; environmental issues such as climate change, atmospheric pollution, and human population; energy sources in the future; evolution; stem cell research; nanotechnology; and drug development. Focus is on the scientific basis for these topics as a basis for intelligent discussion of societal and political implications. Sources include the popular media and scientific media for the nonspecialist, especially those available on the web.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Andersen, H. (PI)

CHEM 28N: SCIENCE COMMUNICATION AND INNOVATION

Preference to freshmen. From the unique perspective and contributions of students in the class, the course will explore evolutionary and revolutionary scientific advances, including the connections of science to society, art, biotechnology, health care, the environment, energy and the economy as well as strategies for communicating science to the public. The course content will be driven by the interests and passions of the participants who will engage academic and industrial thought leaders, providing an opportunity for students to translate their passion for science, research and journalism into articles, websites, podcasts and videos of interest to others. This fusion of journalism and science has led to a new undergraduate organization (https://fascinatepublication.org), which for some participants would be a venue for continuing involvement in science-journalism. The course is an unique opportunity to create course content, research science of interest and produce publications based on science that excites the participants and to share the fun, excitement and importance of such science to the Stanford and global community.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wender, P. (PI)

CHEM 31A: Chemical Principles I

31A is the first course in a two-quarter sequence designed to provide a robust foundation in key chemical principles for students with limited or no background in chemistry. The course engages students in group problem-solving activities throughout the class periods to deepen their ability to analyze and solve chemical problems. Students will also participate in one weekly laboratory activity that will immediately apply and expand upon classroom content. Labs and write-ups provide practice developing conceptual models that can explain qualitatively and quantitatively a wide range of chemical phenomena. The course will introduce a common language of dimensional analysis, stoichiometry, and molecular naming that enables students to write chemical reactions, quantify reaction yield, and calculate empirical and molecular formulas. Stoichiometry will be immediately reinforced through a specific study of gases and their properties. Students will also build a fundamental understanding of atomic and molecular structure by identifying interactions among nuclei, electrons, atoms and molecules. Through both lab and in-class exploration, students will learn to explain how these interactions determine the structures and properties of pure substances and mixtures using various bonding models including Lewis Dot, VSEPR, and Molecular Orbital Theory. Students will identify and quantitate the types and amounts of energy changes that accompany these interactions, phase changes, and chemical reactions, as they prepare to explore chemical dynamics in greater depth in 31B. Special emphasis will be placed on applying content and skills to real world applications such as estimating the carbon efficiency of fossil fuels, understanding hydrogen bonding and other interactions critical to DNA, and calculating the pressure exerted on a deep-sea diver. No prerequisites. Students without AP/IB background are given enrollment priority. This course is not intended for students with AP scores of 4-5; they should instead take Chem 31M. Students with AP 3 or lower should take the chemistry placement exam for further recommendations.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 31AC: Problem Solving in Science

Development and practice of critical problem solving skills using chemical examples. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 31A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cox, C. (PI)

CHEM 31M: Chemical Principles: From Molecules to Solids (MATSCI 31)

A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials and environmental science and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will emphasize bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, valence bond theory, and molecular orbital theory. Lectures will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and reiterate lecture concepts through hands-on activities. Specific discussions and laboratories will emphasize the structure, properties, and applications of molecules used in medicine, perovskites and organic dyes used in solar cells, and the dramatically different properties of materials made with only carbon atoms: diamond, graphite, graphene. There will be three lectures, one two-hour laboratory session, an optional 80-minute problem solving session each week. The course will assume familiarity with stoichiometry, unit conversions, and gas laws. Students earning an AP chemistry score of 4 should take CHEM 31M. Students earning an AP score of 5 are welcome to take CHEM 31M, as a refresher, or will receive credit for CHEM 31M. Students who have taken AP chemistry, but scored a 3 or lower, are welcome to take the placement test to place into CHEM 31M. CHEM 31M cannot be used to replace grades earned in CHEM 31X because previously given the courses are not equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 90: Directed Instruction/Reading

(Formerly Chem 110) Undergraduates pursue a reading program under supervision of a faculty member in Chemistry; may also involve participation in lab. Prerequisites: superior work in CHEM 31A, 31B, 31M, 31X, or 33; and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 100: Chemical Laboratory and Safety Skills

This short course is only held in the second week of Autumn quarter. It provides training in basic chemical laboratory procedures and chemical safety to fulfill the safety training requirement for CHEM 121 (formerly CHEM 35) and more advanced laboratory courses. Includes on-line and in-lab training. Successful completion of all course components required for credit. Prerequisite: introductory organic chemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nelson, A. (PI)

CHEM 121: Organic Chemistry of Bioactive Molecules

(Formerly CHEM 35) Focuses on the structure and reactivity of natural and synthetic bioactive molecules. Covers fundamental concepts underlying chemical reactivity and the logic of chemical synthesis for an appreciation of the profound impact of organic chemistry on humankind in fields ranging from medicine to earth and planetary science. A three hour lab section provides hands on experience with modern chemical methods for preparative and analytical chemistry. Prerequisite CHEM 33 or corequisite CHEM 100.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 123: Organic Polyfunctional Compounds

(Formerly CHEM 131.) Analysis of molecular symmetry and spectroscopy, aromaticity, aromatic reactivity, heterocyclic chemistry, chemistry of peptides and DNA. Prerequisite: CHEM 121 (formerly CHEM 35).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kool, E. (PI)

CHEM 124: Organic Chemistry Laboratory

(Formerly Chem 130) Intermediate organic chemistry laboratory with combined synthesis and spectroscopy. Synthesis involves several reactions including Nobel prize winning reactions, such as Diels-Alder and Wittig reactions; characterization techniques include NMR, IR, and GCMS. Prerequisite: Chem 121 (formerly Chem 35) and corequisite: Chem 123 (formerly 131).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Xia, Y. (PI)

CHEM 173: Physical Chemistry II

Introduction to quantum chemistry: the basic principles of wave mechanics, the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotator, infrared and microwave spectroscopy, the hydrogen atom, atomic structure, molecular structure, valence theory. Prerequisites: CHEM 171; either MATH 53 or PHYSICS 43; CME 102 and CME 104.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Martinez, T. (PI)

CHEM 174: Electrochemical Measurements Lab (CHEM 274)

Introduction to modern electrochemical measurement in a hands-on, laboratory setting. Students assemble and use electrochemical cells including indicator, reference, working and counter electrodes, with macro, micro and ultramicro geometries, salt bridges, ion-selective membranes, electrometers, potentiostats, galvanostats, and stationary and rotated disk electrodes. The later portion of the course will involve a student-generated project to experimentally characterize some electrochemical system. Prerequisites: CHEM 134 and CHEM 171, MATH 51, PHYSICS 44 or equivalent with corequisite CHEM 100.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chidsey, C. (PI)

CHEM 181: Biochemistry I (CHEMENG 181, CHEMENG 281)

Structure and function of major classes of biomolecules, including proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. Mechanistic analysis of properties of proteins including catalysis, signal transduction and membrane transport. Students will also learn to critically analyze data from the primary biochemical literature. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1 for Bio majors. Prerequisites: Chem 121 (formerly 35) and Chem 171.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dassama, L. (PI)

CHEM 190: Advanced Undergraduate Research

Limited to undergraduates who have completed Chem 121 (formerly 35) and/or Chem 134, or by special arrangement with a faculty member. May be repeated 8 times for a max of 27 units. Prerequisite: CHEM 121 (formerly 35) or 134. Corequisite: CHEM 300.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 196: Creating and Leading New Ventures in Engineering and Science-based Industries (CHEM 296, CHEMENG 196, CHEMENG 296)

Open to seniors and graduate students interested in the creation of new ventures and entrepreneurship in engineering and science intensive industries such as chemical, energy, materials, bioengineering, environmental, clean-tech, pharmaceuticals, medical, and biotechnology. Exploration of the dynamics, complexity, and challenges that define creating new ventures, particularly in industries that require long development times, large investments, integration across a wide range of technical and non-technical disciplines, and the creation and protection of intellectual property. Covers business basics, opportunity viability, creating start-ups, entrepreneurial leadership, and entrepreneurship as a career. Teaching methods include lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and individual and team projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEM 200: Research and Special Advanced Work

Qualified graduate students undertake research or advanced lab work not covered by listed courses under the direction of a member of the teaching staff.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 221: Advanced Organic Chemistry I

This is a course in modern synthetic organic chemistry with an emphasis on structure, reactivity, and stereocontrol. It will draw from underlying physical organic principles in order for students to learn how to analyze complex molecular structures, predict functional group reactivity, propose reasonable reaction mechanisms, and begin to construct multistep syntheses of organic molecules. Syntheses discussed will serve as jumping off points to cover strategy and many types of transformations. A solid foundation in organic chemistry is expected.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burns, N. (PI)

CHEM 232: Applications of NMR Spectroscopy

(Formerly 235) The uses of NMR spectroscopy in chemical and biochemical sciences, emphasizing data acquisition for liquid samples and including selection, setup, and processing of standard and advanced experiments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lynch, S. (PI)

CHEM 258C: Research Progress in Inorganic Chemistry

Required of all second-, third-, and fourth-year Ph.D. candidates in inorganic chemistry. Students present their research progress in written and oral forms (A); present a seminar in the literature of the field of research (B); and formulate, write, and orally defend a research proposal (C). Second-year students register for A; third-year students register for B; fourth-year students register for C.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Solomon, E. (PI)

CHEM 261: Computational Chemistry

Introduction to computational chemistry methods and tools that can be used to interpret and guide experimental research. Project based and hands-on experience with electronic structure calculations, obtaining minimum energy structures and reaction pathways, molecular simulation and modeling. Prerequisite: knowledge of undergraduate level quantum mechanics at the level of Chem 173.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Markland, T. (PI)

CHEM 271: Advanced Physical Chemistry

The principles of quantum mechanics. General formulation, mathematical methods, and applications of quantum theory. Different representations of quantum theory, i. e., the Dirac, Schrödinger, matrix, and density matrix methods. Time independent exactly solvable problems and approximate methods including time independent perturbation theory and the variational method. Atomic energy calculations, angular momentum, and introduction to molecular structure methods. Time dependent methods. Time dependent perturbation theory applied to various problems such as absorption and emission of radiation. Time dependent density matrix formalism applied to coherent coupling of radiation fields to molecular systems, e.g., NMR and optical spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Chem 175 or equivalent course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fayer, M. (PI)

CHEM 274: Electrochemical Measurements Lab (CHEM 174)

Introduction to modern electrochemical measurement in a hands-on, laboratory setting. Students assemble and use electrochemical cells including indicator, reference, working and counter electrodes, with macro, micro and ultramicro geometries, salt bridges, ion-selective membranes, electrometers, potentiostats, galvanostats, and stationary and rotated disk electrodes. The later portion of the course will involve a student-generated project to experimentally characterize some electrochemical system. Prerequisites: CHEM 134 and CHEM 171, MATH 51, PHYSICS 44 or equivalent with corequisite CHEM 100.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chidsey, C. (PI)

CHEM 296: Creating and Leading New Ventures in Engineering and Science-based Industries (CHEM 196, CHEMENG 196, CHEMENG 296)

Open to seniors and graduate students interested in the creation of new ventures and entrepreneurship in engineering and science intensive industries such as chemical, energy, materials, bioengineering, environmental, clean-tech, pharmaceuticals, medical, and biotechnology. Exploration of the dynamics, complexity, and challenges that define creating new ventures, particularly in industries that require long development times, large investments, integration across a wide range of technical and non-technical disciplines, and the creation and protection of intellectual property. Covers business basics, opportunity viability, creating start-ups, entrepreneurial leadership, and entrepreneurship as a career. Teaching methods include lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and individual and team projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEM 299: Teaching of Chemistry

Required of all teaching assistants in Chemistry. Techniques of teaching chemistry by means of lectures and labs.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 300: Department Colloquium

Required of graduate students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bertozzi, C. (PI)

CHEM 301: Research in Chemistry

Required of graduate students who have passed the qualifying examination. Open to qualified graduate students with the consent of the major professor. Research seminars and directed reading deal with newly developing areas in chemistry and experimental techniques. May be repeated for credit. Search for adviser name on Axess.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 329: Organic Chemistry Seminar

(Formerly 229) Required of graduate students majoring in organic chemistry. Students giving seminars register for CHEM 231.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bertozzi, C. (PI)

CHEM 359: Inorganic Chemistry Seminar

(Formerly 259) Required of graduate students majoring in inorganic chemistry.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Solomon, E. (PI)

CHEM 379: Physical Chemistry Seminar

(Formerly 279) Required of graduate students majoring in physical chemistry. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Markland, T. (PI)

CHEM 390: Curricular Practical Training for Chemists

For Chemistry majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Confer with Chem student services office for signup.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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