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CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32R: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 143A, ARTHIST 343A)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 63: Weather and Storms (CEE 263C)

Daily and severe weather and global climate. Topics: structure and composition of the atmosphere, fog and cloud formation, rainfall, local winds, wind energy, global circulation, jet streams, high and low pressure systems, inversions, el Niño, la Niña, atmosphere/ocean interactions, fronts, cyclones, thunderstorms, lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes, pollutant transport, global climate and atmospheric optics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 80N: Engineering the Built Environment: An Introduction to Structural Engineering

In this seminar, students will be introduced to the history of modern bridges, buildings and other large-scale structures. Classes will include presentations on transformations in structural design inspired by the development of new materials, increased understanding of hazardous overloads and awareness of environmental impacts. Basic principles of structural engineering and how to calculate material efficiency and structural safety of structural forms will be taught using case studies. The course will include a field trip to a Bay Area large-scale structure, hands-on experience building a tower and computational modeling of bridges, and a paper and presentation on a structure or structural form of interest to the student. The goal of this course is for students to develop an understanding and appreciation of modern structures, influences that have led to new forms, and the impact of structural design on society and the environment. Students from all backgrounds are welcome.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Billington, S. (PI)

CEE 100: Managing Sustainable Building Projects

Managing the life cycle of buildings from the owner, designer, and contractor perspectives emphasizing sustainability goals; methods to define, communicate, coordinate, and manage multidisciplinary project objectives including scope, quality, life cycle cost and value, schedule, safety, energy, and social concerns; roles, responsibilities, and risks for project participants; virtual design and construction methods for product, organization, and process modeling; lifecycle assessment methods; individual writing assignment related to a real world project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 101B: Mechanics of Fluids

Physical properties of fluids and their effect on flow behavior; equations of motion for incompressible ideal flow, including the special case of hydrostatics; continuity, energy, and momentum principles; control volume analysis; laminar and turbulent flows; internal and external flows in specific engineering applications including pipes and open channels; elements of boundary-layer theory. The Tuesday lectures, which are preparation for the labs, will start at 12:30pm. Lab experiments will illustrate conservation principles and flows of real fluids, analysis of errors and modeling of simple fluid systems. Students seeking to take this course without the laboratory will need to enroll in CEE 162A but must get permission first from the instructor. Prerequisites: E14, Physics 41, Math 51, or CME 100.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fong, D. (PI)

CEE 101C: Geotechnical Engineering

Introduction to the principles of soil mechanics. Soil classification, shear strength and stress-strain behavior of soils, consolidation theory, analysis and design of earth retaining structures, introduction to shallow and deep foundation design, slope stability. Lab projects. Prerequisite: ENGR 14. Recommended: 101A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Borja, R. (PI)

CEE 101D: Computations in Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE 201D)

Computational and visualization methods in the design and analysis of civil and environmental engineering systems. Focus is on applications of MATLAB. How to develop a more lucid and better organized programming style.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kitanidis, P. (PI)

CEE 107A: Understanding Energy (CEE 207A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Field trip offerings differ each fall (see syllabus for updated list), but may include Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, Shasta dam, Tesla Gigafactory, NextEra wind farm, San Ardo oil field, Geyser¿s geothermal power plants, etc. Students choose two field trips from approximately 8 that are offered. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter ¿ students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 120A: Building Modeling for Design & Construction (CEE 220A)

The foundational Building Information Modeling course introduces techniques for creating, managing, and applying of building information models in the building design and construction process. The course covers processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components and geometries to produce models used in architectural design, construction planning and documentation, rendering and visualization, simulation, and analysis.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 120S: Building Information Modeling Special Study (CEE 220S)

Special studies of Building Information Modeling strategies and techniques focused on creating, managing, and applying models in the building design and construction process. Processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components to produce models used in design, construction planning, visualization, and analysis.Contact glkatz@stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 124: Sustainable Development Studio

(Graduate students register for 224A.) Project-based. Sustainable design, development, use and evolution of buildings; connections of building systems to broader resource systems. Areas include architecture, structure, materials, energy, water, air, landscape, and food. Projects use a cradle-to-cradle approach focusing on technical and biological nutrient cycles and information and knowledge generation and organization. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 124X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 224X)

Note to students: please be advised that the course number for this course has been changed to: CEE 218X, which is offered Autumn 2019-20. If you are interested in taking this course, please enroll in CEE 218X instead for Autumn 2019-20.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 126X: Hard Earth: Environmental Justice (EARTH 126X)

Environmental policies often have disparate impacts on marginalized people. The fall 2019 Hard Earth series will feature biweekly talks by Stanford graduate students who are investigating pressing questions at the intersection of environmental justice and health, energy, and climate change. On the alternate weeks, students who have enrolled to take the full Hard Earth series as a one-unit course (CEE 126XYZ | EARTH 126XYZ) meet for a deeper discussion about the prior week¿s presentation. There will be one culminating talk by a non-student sustainability expert. Learn more about Hard Earth here: https://roblesustainability.stanford.edu/initiatives/hard-earth.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 130: Architectural Design: 3-D Modeling, Methodology, and Process

Preference to Architectural Design majors; others by consent of instructor. Projects investigate conceptual approaches to the design of key architectural elements, such as wall and roof. Functional and structural considerations. Focus is on constructing 3-D models in a range of materials; 3-D computer modeling. Students keep a graphic account of the evolution of their design process. Final project entails design of a simple structure. Limited enrollment. Pre- or corequisite: CEE 31 or 31Q.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Choe, B. (PI)

CEE 134B: Intermediate Arch Studio (CEE 234B)

This studio offers students experience in working with a real site and a real client program to develop a community facility. Students will develop site analysis, review a program for development and ultimately design their own solutions that meet client and community goals. Sustainability, historic preservation, community needs and materials will all play a part in the development of students final project. Students will also gain an understanding of graphic conventions, verbal and presentation techniques. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 139: Design Portfolio Methods (CEE 239)

The portfolio is an essential creative tool used to communicate academic work, design philosophies, and professional intent. This course will explore elements of graphic design, presentation, communication, binding, printing, and construction, yielding a final portfolio (physical and digital) for professional, academic or personal purposes. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: two Art, Design, or Architecture studio courses, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Larimer, A. (PI)

CEE 141A: Infrastructure Project Development (CEE 241A)

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities, and communications sectors. Analysis of the condition of the nation's infrastructure and how projects are planned and financed. Focus is on public works in the U.S. The role of public and private sectors through a step-by-step study of the project development process. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare project environmental impact statements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Moscovich, J. (PI)

CEE 146S: Engineering Economics and Sustainability (ENGR 60)

Engineering Economics is a subset of the field of economics that draws upon the logic of economics, but adds that analytical power of mathematics and statistics. The concepts developed in this course are broadly applicable to many professional and personal decisions, including making purchasing decisions, deciding between project alternatives, evaluating different processes, and balancing environmental and social costs against economic costs. The concepts taught in this course will be increasingly valuable as students climb the carrier ladder in private industry, a non-governmental organization, a public agency, or in founding their own startup. Eventually, the ability to make informed decisions that are based in fundamental analysis of alternatives is a part of every career. As such, this course is recommended for engineering and non-engineering students alike. This course is taught exclusively online in every quarter it is offered. (Prerequisites: MATH 19 or 20 or approved equivalent.)
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 161I: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation (CEE 261I, EARTHSYS 146A, ESS 246A)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the atmospheric circulation. Topics include the global energy balance, the greenhouse effect, the vertical and meridional structure of the atmosphere, dry and moist convection, the equations of motion for the atmosphere and ocean, including the effects of rotation, and the poleward transport of heat by the large-scale atmospheric circulation and storm systems. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100 and PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 162A: Mechanics of Fluids

Formerly CEE 101X. Course content is the same as CEE 101B but without the Tuesday lecture and lab component. Permission of the instructor is required first to enroll in CEE 162A. Prerequisites: E14, Physics 41 (formerlyl 63) Math 51.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fong, D. (PI)

CEE 162D: Introduction to Physical Oceanography (CEE 262D, EARTHSYS 164, ESS 148)

Formerly CEE 164. The dynamic basis of oceanography. Topics: physical environment; conservation equations for salt, heat, and momentum; geostrophic flows; wind-driven flows; the Gulf Stream; equatorial dynamics and ENSO; thermohaline circulation of the deep oceans; and tides. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 (formerly 53).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Monismith, S. (PI)

CEE 162F: Coastal Processes

Formerly Coastal Engineering. Fluid dynamics and sediment transport processes that govern the physical behavior of the coastal ocean. Topics: waves, coastal sediment transport, tides, storm surge, sea-level rise, estuarine circulation, river plumes, and upwelling. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 (formerly 53).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fringer, O. (PI)

CEE 166A: Watersheds and Wetlands (CEE 266A)

Introduction to the occurrence and movement of water in the natural environment and its role in creating and maintaining terrestrial, wetland, and aquatic habitat. Hydrologic processes, including precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, snowmelt, infiltration, subsurface flow, runoff, and streamflow. Rivers and lakes, springs and swamps. Emphasis is on observation and measurement, data analysis, modeling, and prediction. Prerequisite: CEE 101B or CEE 162A or equivalent. (Freyberg)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 174A: Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World

This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. The course should enable students to work competently in environmental engineering firms or on non-profit projects in the developing world such as Engineers without Borders. Pre-requisite: Chem31B/X.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 177: Aquatic Chemistry and Biology

Introduction to chemical and biological processes in the aqueous environment. Basic aqueous equilibria; the structure, behavior, and fate of major classes of chemicals that dissolve in water; redox reactions; the biochemistry of aquatic microbial life; and biogeochemical processes that govern the fate of nutrients and metals in the environment and in engineered systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Criddle, C. (PI)

CEE 178: Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis (CEE 276)

(Graduate students register for 276.) Scientific and engineering issues involved in quantifying human exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment. Pollutant behavior, inhalation exposure, dermal exposure, and assessment tools. Overview of the complexities, uncertainties, and physical, chemical, and biological issues relevant to risk assessment. Lab projects. Recommended: MATH 51. Apply at first class for admission.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 181: Design of Steel Structures

Concepts of the design of steel structures with a load and resistance factor design (LRFD) approach; types of loading; structural systems; design of tension members, compression members, beams, beam-columns, and connections; and design of trusses and frames. Prerequisite: 180.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 199A: Special Projects in Architecture

Faculty-directed study or internship. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 199B: Directed Studies in Architecture

Projects may include studio-mentoring activities, directed reading and writing on topics in the history and theory of architectural design, or investigations into design methodologies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 199D: Urban Water Supply and Management

We will discuss urban runoff and stormwater management for water supply, and use the Stanford campus as a case study. The course will mentor the freshmen about environmental engineering and professional preparation for careers in water supply and water quality engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 199H: Undergraduate Honors Thesis

For students who have declared the Civil Engineering B.S. honors major and have obtained approval of a topic for research under the guidance of a CEE faculty adviser. Letter grade only. Written thesis or oral presentation required.n (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 199L: Independent Project in Civil and Environmental Engineering

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 200A: Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship: 200A. Aut; 200B. Win; 200C. Spr
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 201D: Computations in Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE 101D)

Computational and visualization methods in the design and analysis of civil and environmental engineering systems. Focus is on applications of MATLAB. How to develop a more lucid and better organized programming style.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kitanidis, P. (PI)

CEE 201E: Nonlinear Dynamics

Most real-world systems are to some degree nonlinear, and the addition of nonlinearity can lead to qualitatively different kinds of behavior as compared with linear systems. This course provides an introduction to the analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems, with examples drawn from across the sciences and engineering. In addition to formal analysis, the course will emphasize qualitative and geometric thinking. Topics will include one-dimensional systems; bifurcations; phase-plane analysis; nonlinear oscillators; and chaos, fractals, and strange attractors. Prerequisites: Differential equations at the level of CME 102 and linear algebra at the level of CME 104; some programming experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ouellette, N. (PI)

CEE 203: Probabilistic Models in Civil Engineering

Introduction to probability modeling and statistical analysis in civil engineering. Emphasis is on the practical issues of model selection, interpretation, and calibration. Application of common probability models used in civil engineering including Poisson processes and extreme value distributions. Parameter estimation. Linear regression.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 207A: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Field trip offerings differ each fall (see syllabus for updated list), but may include Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, Shasta dam, Tesla Gigafactory, NextEra wind farm, San Ardo oil field, Geyser¿s geothermal power plants, etc. Students choose two field trips from approximately 8 that are offered. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter ¿ students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 209S: Disaster Resilience Seminar

This seminar will present topics associated with quantifying, communicating and improving the resilience of urban areas to disasters. Speakers from a range of disciplines will present current research, application, and thinking on innovations, current best practices and the future of disaster resilience. Guest speakers, supplemental reading, and group discussion will be utilized to teach about the complex nature of natural disasters, the impacts on different regions, and the multi-disciplinary/multi-cultural ways of thinking to prepare communities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 218X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 220A: Building Modeling for Design & Construction (CEE 120A)

The foundational Building Information Modeling course introduces techniques for creating, managing, and applying of building information models in the building design and construction process. The course covers processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components and geometries to produce models used in architectural design, construction planning and documentation, rendering and visualization, simulation, and analysis.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 220S: Building Information Modeling Special Study (CEE 120S)

Special studies of Building Information Modeling strategies and techniques focused on creating, managing, and applying models in the building design and construction process. Processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components to produce models used in design, construction planning, visualization, and analysis.Contact glkatz@stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 224A: Sustainable Development Studio

(Undergraduates, see 124.) Project-based. Sustainable design, development, use and evolution of buildings; connections of building systems to broader resource systems. Areas include architecture, structure, materials, energy, water, air, landscape, and food. Projects use a cradle-to-cradle approach focusing on technical and biological nutrient cycles and information and knowledge generation and organization. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 224X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 124X)

Note to students: please be advised that the course number for this course has been changed to: CEE 218X, which is offered Autumn 2019-20. If you are interested in taking this course, please enroll in CEE 218X instead for Autumn 2019-20.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 226: Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems

Life cycle modeling of products, industrial processes, and infrastructure/building systems; material and energy balances for large interdependent systems; environmental accounting; and life cycle costing. These methods, based on ISO 14000 standards, are used to examine emerging technologies, such as biobased products, building materials, building integrated photovoltaics, and alternative design strategies, such as remanufacturing, dematerialization, LEED, and Design for Environment: DfE. Student teams complete a life cycle assessment of a product or system chosen from industry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 234B: Intermediate Arch Studio (CEE 134B)

This studio offers students experience in working with a real site and a real client program to develop a community facility. Students will develop site analysis, review a program for development and ultimately design their own solutions that meet client and community goals. Sustainability, historic preservation, community needs and materials will all play a part in the development of students final project. Students will also gain an understanding of graphic conventions, verbal and presentation techniques. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 239: Design Portfolio Methods (CEE 139)

The portfolio is an essential creative tool used to communicate academic work, design philosophies, and professional intent. This course will explore elements of graphic design, presentation, communication, binding, printing, and construction, yielding a final portfolio (physical and digital) for professional, academic or personal purposes. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: two Art, Design, or Architecture studio courses, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Larimer, A. (PI)

CEE 240: Project Assessment and Budgeting

Course objectives: 1) learn the processes of determining the quantities of permanent materials required and the associated construction quantities; 2) learn the capabilities of construction equipment; 3) be introduced to the make-up of construction crews; 4) design concrete form systems; 5) utilize the historic productivity of a crew to estimate the cost of construction; 6) write construction logic to create a critical path project schedule; 7) distribute the cost of construction over schedule activities to generate a cash flow curve and monthly payment schedule for the project.nConstruction engineering: A construction project that has reached final design must be quantified, a delivery schedule developed, it's final total price determined and the month by month demand for cash payments established. Each student will perform these activities to satisfy a "Course Project" requirement utilizing actual project design drawings obtained from the companies of the Guest Lectures and others. Guest Lecturers from: Disney Construction, Pankow Construction, Granite Construction, Stacy & Witbeck Incorporated.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 241: Managing Fabrication and Construction

Methods to manage the physical production of construction projects; design, analysis, and optimization of the fabricate-assemble process including performance metrics. Project management techniques and production system design including: push versus pull methods; master scheduling and look-ahead scheduling; scope, cost, and schedule control; earned value analysis; critical path method; location-based scheduling; 4D modeling; workflow; trade coordination; methods to understand uncertainty and reduce process variability; and supply chain systems including made-to-stock, engineered-to-order, and made-to-order. Prerequisite: 100 or consent of instructor. Recommended corequisite: 240.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 241A: Infrastructure Project Development (CEE 141A)

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities, and communications sectors. Analysis of the condition of the nation's infrastructure and how projects are planned and financed. Focus is on public works in the U.S. The role of public and private sectors through a step-by-step study of the project development process. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare project environmental impact statements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Moscovich, J. (PI)

CEE 243: Intro to Urban Sys Engrg

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary domain of urban systems engineering. It will provide you with a high-level understanding of the motivation for studying sustainable cities and urban systems, systems-based modeling approaches and the social actor theories embedded in the urban sustainability decision making process. Coursework will be comprised of three group mini-projects corresponding to course modules.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jain, R. (PI)

CEE 244: Accounting, Finance & Valuation for Engineers & Constructors

Concepts of financial accounting and economics emphasizing the construction industry. Financial statements, accounting concepts, project accounting methods, and the nature of project costs. Case study of major construction contractor. Ownership structure, working capital, and the sources and uses of funds.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 258: Donald R. Watson Seminar in Construction Engineering and Management

Presentations from construction industry leaders. Discussions with speakers from various segments of industry regarding career options. Student groups interact with industry representatives after class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sedar, B. (PI)

CEE 259A: Construction Problems

Group-selected problems in construction techniques, equipment, or management; preparation of oral and written reports. Guest specialists from the construction industry. See 299 for individual studies. Prerequisites: graduate standing in CEM program and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 260A: Physical Hydrogeology (ESS 220)

(Formerly GES 230.) Theory of underground water occurrence and flow, analysis of field data and aquifer tests, geologic groundwater environments, solution of field problems, and groundwater modeling. Introduction to groundwater contaminant transport and unsaturated flow. Lab. Prerequisite: elementary calculus.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 261A: The Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Fundamental Physics and Modeling

An introduction to the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), including measurements and simulations of ABL flows. Wind and flow, turbulent transport, buoyancy and virtual potential temperature, the diurnal cycle. Derivation of the governing equations, simplifications and assumptions. Turbulence kinetic energy and its budget, ABL stability, the Richardson number and the Obukhov length. Analysis of boundary layer turbulence. Overview of field and wind tunnel measurement techniques, and of computational models from meso- to micro-scale. a Discussion of micro-scale applications, including pedestrian wind comfort, pollutant dispersion and wind loading, and an introduction to uncertainty quantification for ABL flows. Prerequisites: Knowledge of fluid mechanics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 261I: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation (CEE 161I, EARTHSYS 146A, ESS 246A)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the atmospheric circulation. Topics include the global energy balance, the greenhouse effect, the vertical and meridional structure of the atmosphere, dry and moist convection, the equations of motion for the atmosphere and ocean, including the effects of rotation, and the poleward transport of heat by the large-scale atmospheric circulation and storm systems. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100 and PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 262B: Transport and Mixing in Surface Water Flows

Application of fluid mechanics to problems of pollutant transport and mixing in the water environment. Mathematical models of advection, diffusion, and dispersion. Application of theory to problems of transport and mixing in rivers, estuaries, and lakes and reservoirs. Recommended: 262A and CME 102 (formerly ENGR 155A), or equivalents.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Monismith, S. (PI)

CEE 262D: Introduction to Physical Oceanography (CEE 162D, EARTHSYS 164, ESS 148)

Formerly CEE 164. The dynamic basis of oceanography. Topics: physical environment; conservation equations for salt, heat, and momentum; geostrophic flows; wind-driven flows; the Gulf Stream; equatorial dynamics and ENSO; thermohaline circulation of the deep oceans; and tides. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 (formerly 53).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Monismith, S. (PI)

CEE 263C: Weather and Storms (CEE 63)

Daily and severe weather and global climate. Topics: structure and composition of the atmosphere, fog and cloud formation, rainfall, local winds, wind energy, global circulation, jet streams, high and low pressure systems, inversions, el Niño, la Niña, atmosphere/ocean interactions, fronts, cyclones, thunderstorms, lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes, pollutant transport, global climate and atmospheric optics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 263S: Atmosphere/Energy Seminar

Interdisciplinary seminar with talks by researchers and practitioners in the fields of atmospheric science and renewable energy engineering. Addresses the causes of climate, air pollution, and weather problems and methods of addressing these problems through renewable and efficient energy systems. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 265E: Adaptation to Sea Level Rise and Extreme Weather Events

Students are introduced to basic aspects of climate change in the context of sea level rise and the intensity and frequency of extreme-weather events, including floods, droughts and wildfires. Climate change adaptations are adjustments in behaviors, plans and projects to reduce society's vulnerability to climate change impacts. Major adaptation approaches relevant to civil and environmental engineers are emphasized. Adaptation measures considered include structural and ecologically-based measures for dealing with sea level rise, storm surges, floods and wildfires. In the context of coastal flooding, consideration is also given to ¿managed retreat¿ (i.e., deliberately altering flood defenses to allow flooding of presently protected areas). Influence of climate change on migration is also considered. Additional measures to reduce vulnerability include emergency preparedness and disaster response management systems. Illustrations of innovative adaptation measures taken by cities around the world are featured. Common barriers to climate change adaptation are also reviewed. Limited enrollment. Students from all departments and programs are welcome, with some admission preference given to students in CEE graduate programs followed by CEE Department seniors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ortolano, L. (PI)

CEE 266A: Watersheds and Wetlands (CEE 166A)

Introduction to the occurrence and movement of water in the natural environment and its role in creating and maintaining terrestrial, wetland, and aquatic habitat. Hydrologic processes, including precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, snowmelt, infiltration, subsurface flow, runoff, and streamflow. Rivers and lakes, springs and swamps. Emphasis is on observation and measurement, data analysis, modeling, and prediction. Prerequisite: CEE 101B or CEE 162A or equivalent. (Freyberg)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 269A: Environmental Engineering Seminar

Presentations on current research in environmental engineering by Civil & Environmental Engineering faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fringer, O. (PI); Ong, C. (SI)

CEE 270: Movement and Fate of Organic Contaminants in Waters

Transport of chemical constituents in surface and groundwater including advection, dispersion, sorption, interphase mass transfer, and transformation; impacts on water quality. Emphasis is on physicochemical processes and the behavior of hazardous waste contaminants. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry and calculus. Recommended: 101B.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Luthy, R. (PI); Wang, Z. (TA)

CEE 272T: SmartGrids and Advanced Power Systems Seminar (EE 292T)

A series of seminar and lectures focused on power engineering. Renowned researchers from universities and national labs will deliver bi-weekly seminars on the state of the art of power system engineering. Seminar topics may include: power system analysis and simulation, control and stability, new market mechanisms, computation challenges and solutions, detection and estimation, and the role of communications in the grid. The instructors will cover relevant background materials in the in-between weeks. The seminars are planned to continue throughout the next academic year, so the course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rajagopal, R. (PI)

CEE 273: Aquatic Chemistry

Chemical principles and their application to the analysis and solution of problems in aqueous geochemistry (temperatures near 25° C and atmospheric pressure). Emphasis is on natural water systems and the solution of specific chemical problems in water purification technology and water pollution control. Prerequisites: CHEM 31 and 33, or equivalents.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Leckie, J. (PI)

CEE 274A: Environmental Microbiology I (BIO 273A, CHEMENG 174, CHEMENG 274)

Basics of microbiology and biochemistry. The biochemical and biophysical principles of biochemical reactions, energetics, and mechanisms of energy conservation. Diversity of microbial catabolism, flow of organic matter in nature: the carbon cycle, and biogeochemical cycles. Bacterial physiology, phylogeny, and the ecology of microbes in soil and marine sediments, bacterial adhesion, and biofilm formation. Microbes in the degradation of pollutants. Prerequisites: CHEM 33,CHEM 121 (formerly CHEM 35), and BIOSCI 41, CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188), or equivalents.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 275D: Environmental Policy Analysis

Environmental policy formation is a complex process involving a large number of actors making value laden interpretations of scientifically complex phenomena. This course explores the origins of this complexity and its implications for the future of environmental decision making and policy-directed environmental engineering. We will begin by asking what good environmental policy looks like, including how we set policy for groups of individuals with diverse preferences, how we value preferences across space and time, and how we account for the deep uncertainty that permeates environmental systems. We then turn to how environmental policies are actually developed, exploring the technical, cognitive, organizational, and systemic barriers to implementing ¿good¿ policy. Finally, will explore the role of scientific evidence in shaping environmental policy and the mechanisms by which policy shapes engineering and science research. Students will gain familiarity with the existing theories, methods, and strategies used to set environmental policy; critically examine the embedded assumptions and inherent shortcomings of these approaches; and practice their thoughtful and ethical application to timely environmental challenges. Course Structure: This course combines a lecture-based introduction to critical material with extensive in-class discussion of daily readings from the policy analysis canon. As such, it is designed for PhD and Masters students across the university with an interest in exploring the effective role of science in setting public policy and comfort in reading primary literature. Upper level undergraduates are welcome with instructor consent. Assessment elements will include class participation, responses on 4 to 5 written assignments, and a take-home final. Occasional Friday recitation sessions will provide guidance on the application of policy analysis methods,
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mauter, M. (PI)

CEE 276: Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis (CEE 178)

(Graduate students register for 276.) Scientific and engineering issues involved in quantifying human exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment. Pollutant behavior, inhalation exposure, dermal exposure, and assessment tools. Overview of the complexities, uncertainties, and physical, chemical, and biological issues relevant to risk assessment. Lab projects. Recommended: MATH 51. Apply at first class for admission.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 277F: Advanced Field Methods in Water, Health and Development

Field methods for assessing household stored water quality, hand contamination, behaviors, and knowledge related to water, sanitation and health. Limited enrollment. Instructor consent required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Davis, J. (PI)

CEE 280: Advanced Structural Analysis

Theoretical development and computer implementation of direct stiffness method of structural analysis; virtual work principles; computation of element stiffness matrices and load vectors; direct assembly procedures; equation solution techniques. Analysis of two- and three-dimensional truss and frame structures, thermal loads, and substructuring and condensation techniques for large systems. Practical modeling techniques and programming assignments. Introduction to nonlinear analysis concepts. Prerequisites: elementary structural analysis and matrix algebra.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Deierlein, G. (PI)

CEE 284: Finite Element Methods in Structural Dynamics

Computational methods for structural dynamics analysis of discrete and continuous systems in free and forced vibration; finite element formulation; modal analysis; numerical methods; introduction to nonlinear dynamics; advanced topics. Prerequisites: 280, 283.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Law, K. (PI)

CEE 285A: Advanced Structural Concrete Behavior and Design

Behavior and design of reinforced and prestressed concrete for building and bridge design. Topics will include flexural behavior, prestressed concrete design, and two-way slab design & analysis, among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 291: Solid Mechanics

Vector and tensor algebra; vector and tensor analysis; kinetics, basic physical quantities, global and local balance laws, representative material models of 1D and 3D continua at small strains; thermodynamics of general internal variable formulations of inelasticity; integration algorithms for inelastic 1D and 3D materials; basic solution techniques for boundary value problems in 1D and 3D.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 292X: Battery Systems for Transportation and GridnServices (EE 292X)

Driven by high-capacity battery systems, electrification is transforming mobility solutions and the grid that powers them. This course provides an introduction to battery systems for transportation and grid services: cell technologies, topology selection, thermal and aging management, safety monitoring, AC and DC charging, and operation control/optimization. Invited experts introduce students to the state¿of¿theart of each topic. The course is aimed at mezzanine and graduate levels students who wish to design battery systems, model them from data, integrate them into applications, or just learn about them. It can be taken for 1 unit (Credit/no Credit) for attending seminars, or for 3 units (letter grade only) for also doing an optional project. Prerequisites: No prerequisites needed for taking the course for 1 unit. Relevant background in selected project area is recommended, for example, CEE 272R for grid applications; EE 253 for AC or DC charging and battery controller design; CEE 322, CS 229 or EE 104 for data-based projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 299L: Independent Project in Civil and Environmental Engineering

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 301: The Energy Seminar (ENERGY 301, MS&E 494)

Interdisciplinary exploration of current energy challenges and opportunities, with talks by faculty, visitors, and students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Weyant, J. (PI)

CEE 322: Data Analytics for Urban Systems

TBA
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rajagopal, R. (PI)

CEE 323A: Infrastructure Finance and Governance

Presentation and discussion of early stage or more mature research on a variety of topics related to financing, governance and sustainability of civil infrastructure projects by researchers associated with the Global Projects Center and visiting speakers. To obtain one unit of credit, students must attend and participate in all seminars, with up to two excused absences. Seminar meets weekly during Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 326: Autonomous Vehicles Studio

Autonomous vehicles have been a fast-growing area of interest for research, development, and commercialization. This interdisciplinary research-based class explores the design and development of autonomous vehicles. Research teams will study the interaction of the human driver and autonomous driving system, particularly in dangerous situations of autonomous systems failures. Collaborate with national and international experts. Independent and team projects will contribute to ongoing research. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fischer, M. (PI); Fu, E. (PI)

CEE 362G: Imaging with Incomplete Information (CME 262)

Statistical and computational methods for inferring images from incomplete data. Bayesian inference methods are used to combine data and quantify uncertainty in the estimate. Fast linear algebra tools are used to solve problems with many pixels and many observations. Applications from several fields but mainly in earth sciences. Prerequisites: Linear algebra and probability theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kitanidis, P. (PI)

CEE 365A: Advanced Topics in Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology

Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 370A: Environmental Research

Introductory research experience for first-year Ph.D. students in the Environmental Engineering and Science program. 15-18 hours/week on research over three quarters. 370A requires written literature survey on a research topic; 370B requires oral presentation on experimental techniques and research progress; 370C requires written or oral presentation of preliminary doctoral research proposal. Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 374A: Introduction to Physiology of Microbes in Biofilms

Diversification of biofilm populations, control of gene expression in biofilm environments, and evolution of novel genetic traits in biofilms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-6 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 374S: Advanced Topics in Microbial Pollution

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boehm, A. (PI)

CEE 374W: Advanced Topics in Water, Health and Development

Advanced topics in water, health and development. Emphasis on low-and-middle-income countries. Class content varies according to interests of students. Instructor consent required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Davis, J. (PI)

CEE 377: Research Proposal Writing in Environmental Engineering and Science

For first- and second-year post-master's students preparing for thesis defense. Students develop progress reports and agency-style research proposals, and present a proposal in oral form. Prerequisite: consent of thesis adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 379: Introduction to PHD Studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering

This seminar course will cover important topics for students considering a PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering. Sessions will include presentations and discussions on career development, exploring research and adviser options, and the mechanics of PhD studies, including General Qualifying Exam requirements for all CEE PHD Students. In addition, CEE faculty will give presentations on their research. This seminar is required for CEE students considering a PHD or preparing to sit for the General Qualifying Exam in Civil and Environmental Engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 385: Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering

Synthesis and application of approaches to performance-based design and assessment that recently have been developed or are under development. Emphasis is on quantitative decision making based on life-cycle considerations that incorporate direct losses, downtime losses, and collapse, and the associated uncertainties. Hazard analysis, response simulation, damage and loss estimation, collapse prediction. Case studies. Prerequisites: 282, 287, and 288.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 398: Report on Civil Engineering Training

On-the-job training under the guidance of experienced, on-site supervisors; meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. Students submit a concise report detailing work activities, problems worked on, and key results. Prerequisite: qualified offer of employment and consent of adviser as per I-Center procedures.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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