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AMSTUD 150X: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (HISTORY 152E, URBANST 150)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kahan, M. (PI)

AMSTUD 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (DANCE 197, TAPS 197)

This class works collaboratively with a local juvenile hall to use civic engagement and performance to explore the aesthetic, cultural and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration on an immediate and personal scale. Taught jointly by a Dance Studies scholar and a lawyer specializing in Juvenile Justice, we will consider what unique understandings are possible if we position the arts as central to an exploration of punishment, rehabilitation and recidivism in America. The course will examine case studies, historical and contemporary narratives about the social, imaginative and behavioral change possible through arts programs in prison.Half of the class meetings will be in Hillcrest Juvenile Hall in San Mateo, where our class will join with a group of 13-18 year old youths currently detained there. Dance will be used to help shape their individual expressive voices, and ours, through collaborative hip hop dance classes. Books to be read are Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson, and Last Chance in Texas by John Hubner.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ross, J. (PI)

ASNAMST 123: Asian Americans and Environmental Justice (EARTHSYS 123)

One central tenet of the environmental justice movement is centering the leadership of frontline communities. Unfortunately, the struggles of Asian Americans on the frontlines of corporate environmental pollution and extraction are less visible and less well-known. In this course, we will explore the Asian American voices that have contributed to the development of the environmental justice movement and the leadership that is shaping the future of this movement.nThis course is designed to provide students with education about the history of the environmental justice movement, the future being envisioned, and the strategies that are needed to get to the vision. It will draw on lectures, readings, guest presentations, case studies, and the instructor's more than 15 years of experience with organizing and social justice campaigns. Students will learn about the principles guiding the environmental justice movement; the vision and framework of how we achieve a just transition to a regenerative economy; the process of organizing and campaign work to advance a community agenda; and skills in collecting, analyzing, and communicating information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Huang, V. (PI)

ASNAMST 131: Trauma, healing, and empowerment in Asian America (CSRE 131C)

This course will look at the ways in which Asian Americans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHPR 223: Obesity in America: Clinical and Public Health Implications (HUMBIO 123)

Interdisciplinary clinical, research, and policy approaches. The prevalence, predictors, and consequences of obesity and diabetes; biological and physiological mechanisms; clinical treatments including medications and surgery; and the relevance of behavioral, environmental, economic, and policy approaches to obesity prevention and control. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 123. CHPR Master's students who are not medical students enroll in CHPR 223 for a letter grade. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rosas, L. (PI)

CSRE 131C: Trauma, healing, and empowerment in Asian America (ASNAMST 131)

This course will look at the ways in which Asian Americans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 150B: RACE AND CRIME PRACTICUM (PSYCH 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in Psych 150: Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students will participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. nnPrerequisite: Psych 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DANCE 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (AMSTUD 197, TAPS 197)

This class works collaboratively with a local juvenile hall to use civic engagement and performance to explore the aesthetic, cultural and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration on an immediate and personal scale. Taught jointly by a Dance Studies scholar and a lawyer specializing in Juvenile Justice, we will consider what unique understandings are possible if we position the arts as central to an exploration of punishment, rehabilitation and recidivism in America. The course will examine case studies, historical and contemporary narratives about the social, imaginative and behavioral change possible through arts programs in prison.Half of the class meetings will be in Hillcrest Juvenile Hall in San Mateo, where our class will join with a group of 13-18 year old youths currently detained there. Dance will be used to help shape their individual expressive voices, and ours, through collaborative hip hop dance classes. Books to be read are Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson, and Last Chance in Texas by John Hubner.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ross, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 123: Asian Americans and Environmental Justice (ASNAMST 123)

One central tenet of the environmental justice movement is centering the leadership of frontline communities. Unfortunately, the struggles of Asian Americans on the frontlines of corporate environmental pollution and extraction are less visible and less well-known. In this course, we will explore the Asian American voices that have contributed to the development of the environmental justice movement and the leadership that is shaping the future of this movement.nThis course is designed to provide students with education about the history of the environmental justice movement, the future being envisioned, and the strategies that are needed to get to the vision. It will draw on lectures, readings, guest presentations, case studies, and the instructor's more than 15 years of experience with organizing and social justice campaigns. Students will learn about the principles guiding the environmental justice movement; the vision and framework of how we achieve a just transition to a regenerative economy; the process of organizing and campaign work to advance a community agenda; and skills in collecting, analyzing, and communicating information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Huang, V. (PI)

FEMGEN 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking (HISTORY 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C (FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

FEMGEN 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (HISTORY 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W (FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W (FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

FEMGEN 138: Men's Violence Against Women in Literature: A Critical and Social Analysis (FEMGEN 238)

Literature, as a social and cultural product of its time, can inform and deepen our understanding of oppression. Using literature as a vehicle, this course will explore the impact of and responses to men's violence against women. Students will critically assess how the author has portrayed the topic of sexual assault and relationship abuse, how the characters and/or author exhibits victim blaming, and, if the characters were living today, would current policies adequately hold the perpetrator responsible, provide safety and justice for the survivor, and challenge rape culture. In dialogue with theoretical texts, we will analyze the literary representations of patriarchy that inform societal acceptance of gender-based violence, identify the historical prevalence of victim blaming and impunity in these works, and assess the implications on policy making at the individual, community and political level. Students will critically examine literature including Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Ubervilles, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Louise Erdrich's The Round House and Joyce Carol Oates' We Were the Mulvaneys.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Baran, N. (PI)

FEMGEN 238: Men's Violence Against Women in Literature: A Critical and Social Analysis (FEMGEN 138)

Literature, as a social and cultural product of its time, can inform and deepen our understanding of oppression. Using literature as a vehicle, this course will explore the impact of and responses to men's violence against women. Students will critically assess how the author has portrayed the topic of sexual assault and relationship abuse, how the characters and/or author exhibits victim blaming, and, if the characters were living today, would current policies adequately hold the perpetrator responsible, provide safety and justice for the survivor, and challenge rape culture. In dialogue with theoretical texts, we will analyze the literary representations of patriarchy that inform societal acceptance of gender-based violence, identify the historical prevalence of victim blaming and impunity in these works, and assess the implications on policy making at the individual, community and political level. Students will critically examine literature including Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Ubervilles, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Louise Erdrich's The Round House and Joyce Carol Oates' We Were the Mulvaneys.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Baran, N. (PI)

GERMAN 136: Refugees, Politics and Culture in Contemporary Germany (GERMAN 336)

Responses to refugees and immigration to Germany against the backdrop of German history and in the context of domestic and European politics. Topics include: cultural difference and integration processes, gender roles, religious traditions, populism and neo-nationalism. Reading knowledge of German, another European language, or an immigrant language will be useful for research projects, but not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 336: Refugees, Politics and Culture in Contemporary Germany (GERMAN 136)

Responses to refugees and immigration to Germany against the backdrop of German history and in the context of domestic and European politics. Topics include: cultural difference and integration processes, gender roles, religious traditions, populism and neo-nationalism. Reading knowledge of German, another European language, or an immigrant language will be useful for research projects, but not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berman, R. (PI)

HISTORY 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HUMBIO 178T)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking (FEMGEN 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C (FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (FEMGEN 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W (FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W (FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 152E: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (AMSTUD 150X, URBANST 150)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kahan, M. (PI)

HUMBIO 123: Obesity in America: Clinical and Public Health Implications (CHPR 223)

Interdisciplinary clinical, research, and policy approaches. The prevalence, predictors, and consequences of obesity and diabetes; biological and physiological mechanisms; clinical treatments including medications and surgery; and the relevance of behavioral, environmental, economic, and policy approaches to obesity prevention and control. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 123. CHPR Master's students who are not medical students enroll in CHPR 223 for a letter grade. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rosas, L. (PI)

LAW 805C: Policy Practicum: Campaign Finance Task Force

This policy practicum will engage students to perform research on a number of topics related to the financing of election campaigns, with a particular eye on developments that have taken place in the 2016 election. The client is a national campaign finance task force led by former White House Counsel Robert Bauer and former Romney and Bush campaign Counsel Ben Ginsberg. Research areas would include: How has the financing of campaigns changed following Citizens United? How have candidates, parties and groups altered spending to account for the rise of the internet as a medium of political communication? Have developments in outside spending affected the power of political parties? How has primary campaign spending changed as a result of rising political polarization? This policy practicum will not meet regularly; each student will meet periodically with Professor Persily to determine a research topic and a strategy for developing a paper to be handed in by the end of the term. Elements used in grading: Final Paper. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Persily, N. (PI)

LAW 805F: Policy Practicum: Endstage Decisions: Health Directives in Law and Practice

(Formerly Law 413Z) Medical decisions toward the end of life can be crucial and difficult for patients, doctors, and the families of patients. Law and medicine have been struggling to find ways to strike a balance between what the patients might want (or say they want), and what makes medical, economic, and ethical sense. People have been encouraged to fill out "Advanced Health Care Directives," which give guidance to doctors and surrogates (usually a family member) on what to do when faced with end-of-life dilemmas. Another form, adopted in just over half the states (including California) is the POLST form (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment). The two types are supposed to complement each other, but they are different in important ways. The Advanced Health Care Directive expresses what a person wants, or thinks she wants, and/or appoints a surrogate in case the patient is unable to express her wishes. Anybody can fill out a Directive, at any time of life. Ideally, a copy goes to the surrogate, if one is appointed, and another to the primary care physician. The POLST form is meant for people who are seriously ill. It is a one page form, printed on bright pink paper. It is signed by patient and doctor. The directives (for example "no artificial nutrition by tube") are supposed to be controlling; the patient, of course, can change her mind; but there is no surrogate. It is an agreement between the patient and the doctor. Who uses these forms? How effective are they? To what extent and in what situations are they useful? In what situations are they not useful? Can they be made more useful and, if so, how? Students will look at some of the current literature on the topic and work from past practicum work, but the main point is to find out what local hospitals and nursing homes are doing. Students will conduct interviews with doctors, nurses, and other health care specialists in order to find out what one might call the living law of the Directive and of POLST. The aim is to get a more realistic picture of the situation in the area: How are these forms used? When are they used? What is the experience of health care professionals with the forms? What is the experience of patients and family members? The ultimate goal would be policy recommendations for improvements in the forms themselves and in associated laws, along with recommendations to improve how the forms can be used - or whether some entirely different approach might be needed. Stanford Hospital and Clinics will be the client in researching and addressing the above questions. Elements used in grading: Written Assignments, Final Paper. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 805L: Policy Practicum: Native Brief Project

Students will participate in the Native Amicus Brief Project, http://nativebrief.sites.yale.edu/, a national non-profit that tracks Indian law cases in the lower federal courts and, where warranted, students will research and assist in drafting amicus briefs. Because federal Indian law is complex and often requires knowledge of tribes' unique histories and cultures, amicus briefs can play a crucial role in fostering greater understanding and awareness of Indian law issues. Using Bloomberg Law, students will identify cases involving Indian law issues and summarize them for upload into the Tracking Wiki. Key current issues in federal Indian law cases include questions of federal power and tribal jurisdiction, race and equal protection, gaming, and environmental law and policy. Students will also have the opportunity to conduct research for future amicus briefs in Indian law cases, and may also have opportunities to assist in brief drafting. Extended research opportunities are possible for students enrolled in Section 02, which meets the Research requirement. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from Section 01 (2 units) into Section 02 (3 units), which meets the Research requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, individual meetings with professor; written research memoranda. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Ablavsky, G. (PI)

LAW 805R: Policy Practicum: Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures

I apologize in advance for the fact that there are no paragraph breaks in this description. It is not my fault. Please contact me directly if you have questions about the class and I will email you a more readable description. Thanks, MLD. This is the Policy Lab component for Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures (Law 7047). Seminar with Concurrent Policy Lab: Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures. Policy Lab Client: National Women's Law Center: Over the past six years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students) experience sexual assault. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators, launching one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. Statistics are equally disturbing in the middle and high school context. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 250 colleges and universities currently under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints. At the same time, students accused of sexual assault have complained of botched processes driven by a "campus rape over-correction" that denied them a fair disciplinary hearing. It is clear that schools are struggling to develop and implement policies and procedures that satisfy their legal obligations in this area. While the future of federal enforcement under the Trump Administration is uncertain, schools are still subject to federal and state law that require them have policies and procedures to address sexual harassment and violence. This course focuses on the legal and policy issues surrounding the highly challenging area of investigation and adjudication of sexual assault and other gender-motivated violence on college campuses and in K12 schools. It will cover the federal and state legal frameworks governing these procedures including Title IX, the Violence Against Women Act, and the Clery Act, and examine current cases as well as the rapidly-evolving legal, federal regulatory, and political environment surrounding this issue. Guest speakers working in the area will help to broaden the class's understanding of the subject matter. Students in this seminar will have the opportunity to participate in the invitation-only national conference entitled The Way Forward: Title IX Advocacy in the Trump Era, which will be held May 1-2 at Stanford Law School and is organized in conjunction with the National Women's Law Center. See [http://conferences.law.stanford.edu/thewayforward-title9/] for more information on the conference. Concurrent Seminar and Policy Lab: The seminar is taught concurrently with the Policy Lab (also entitled "Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures"). All students registered for the seminar participate in the Policy Lab, which works with the National Women's Law Center toward the development of a set of evidence-based and legally compliant model policies and procedures. Given all the controversy, surprisingly little is actually known about the policies and processes that are currently in use, nor is there any way of easily ascertaining what the majority of an institution's "peer schools" are doing with respect to solving a challenge or addressing an issue. There is no set of "best practices" to which school administrators can easily turn. Students will analyze cutting-edge issues related to school-based gender-motivated violence and work on a white paper for the NWLC that includes both legal and empirical research into the policies and procedures currently in use around the country. Throughout the class, students will have the opportunity to reflect on what they are learning and how it applies in a professional context. The eventual goal of this Policy Lab is the development in conjunction with NWLC of a free, web-based, open-source set of adaptable model policies and procedures that are targeted for different market segments (i.e., large private, large public, small private, HBCU, community colleges, and k12). Course Schedule and Optional Travel: The first three weeks of the class there will be two meetings per week, on Tuesday and Thursday from 4:15 to 6:15. Students will meet with Fatima Goss Graves, Senior Vice President for Program at the NWLC during week 2 to hear her expectations regarding the project and ask questions. During weeks 4-6 the class will meet once per week, on Thursday from 4:15-7:15 and small groups will work on their assigned sections of the project. On Thursday, May 4 (week 5), the class will meet with special guest Catherine Lhamon, former Assistant Secretary of Education for Civil Rights and have the opportunity to discuss the project with her and receive her feedback. During Week 7, the class will take an optional trip to Washington DC to present the completed project to the staff of the NWLC on Friday May 19. The class will be housed at Stanford in Washington from Thursday May 18, and will attend a hearing of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in the morning of May 19 and then present their project in the afternoon. Travel expenses (other than incidentals) are provided. On Saturday, May 20 we will have the option to meet with other policy makers and activists as well as sightsee (including an attempted visit to the National Museum of African American History). We will return to Stanford on Sunday May 21. There will be no class during week 8. Enrollment, Assignments, and Evaluation; The Seminar and concurrent policy lab are both open to law students, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates. The seminar has two sections. Section 1 is a 2-hour seminar and students enrolling in Section 1 must also enroll in the Policy Lab (1-hour). Section 2 is a 3-hour seminar, and students may enroll in that Section without concurrent enrollment in the Policy Lab. Regardless of the section of enrollment, all students will do the same assignments and be evaluated on the same criteria. All students will complete written work equivalent to a 26 page research paper. Law students will receive "R" credit for the seminar. Elements used in grading: Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Dauber, M. (PI)

LAW 805V: Policy Practicum: Legal and Policy Tools to Prevent Atrocities

(Formerly Law 414E) This policy lab supports the work of the U.S. Atrocities Prevention Board, an interagency body formed by President Obama to monitor at-risk countries and emerging threats and coordinate the U.S. government's responses to atrocity situations. The main client one of the APB's constitutive entities, the Office of Global Criminal Justice (GCJ) in the U.S. Department of State. GCJ advises the Secretary of State and the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights on U.S. policy addressed to the prevention of, responses to, and accountability for mass atrocities. As relevant, the lab's work will also be shared with other agencies involved in the APB, the National Security Council (NSC), the Department of Justice (DOJ), the Department of the Treasury, and the Agency for International Development (USAID). The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, a quasi-governmental entity, has recently created a new program devoted to atrocities prevention that will also serve as a source of potential projects. In addition, we will work with a number of non-governmental organizations dedicated to atrocities prevention and response, such as the Enough! Project, Guernica 37, the Center for Justice & Accountability, Nuru International, and the Clooney Foundation. Many of these organizations are gearing up to carry on this work in the event that atrocities prevention diminishes in priority in the current administration. Elements used in grading: Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Van Schaack, B. (PI)

LAW 805W: Policy Practicum: What If California Had a Foreign Policy?

The Trump presidency has already brought about considerable shifts in U.S. foreign policy and many more changes are on the horizon. Foreign affairs has traditionally been viewed as a particular province of the federal government, with states limited in their abilities to negotiate with other governments through explicit federal constitutional provisions like the Foreign Commerce Clause and the Treaty Clause and more amorphous but also comprehensive powers like federal foreign affairs preemption. Nevertheless, in recent years, federalism has extended into the sphere of foreign affairs, with states and localities engaging foreign governments and exerting influence on international issues; in the environmental arena alone, a number of states and cities played a role around the negotiations of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and California has entered into a cap-and-trade agreement with Québec. This policy lab is designed to explore the possibilities for more active involvement of sub-national actors on issues of major international concern. Building on the efforts of California and other states, counties, and cities, we will actively consider possibilities of international leadership in diverse areas including the environment, human rights, and anti-corruption. Students in the policy lab will work on one of three projects. One project will entail working with the California Governor's Office to explore opportunities for international leadership on climate change. A second will focus on the Enough Project's efforts to develop a strategy for using state-level regulation of financial markets to address human rights abuses and kleptocracy. The final project will partner with Santa Clara County and the Open Government Partnership to create a pathway for cities, counties, and states to demonstrate leadership on transparency and anti-corruption issues globally. Because of the nature of the issues involved in some of these projects, students will be asked to work within a context of attorney-client privilege. The seminar will meet most weeks of the quarter; the first several sessions will set up the general concerns of international relations and constitutional law that will undergird the various project streams, and the remaining sessions will entail group feedback on the work being undertaken by the teams working on the three projects. Students working on each team will write a memo on a particular research question, which will then be integrated with the products of the other individuals on that team to furnish an answer to a specific question posed at the outset by the California Governor's Office, Santa Clara County, or the Enough Project. During the second half of the quarter, class meetings will be devoted to presentations by one of the research teams to the rest of the participants, who will provide feedback on their work product in anticipation of further revisions, which the members of the relevant team will then complete. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section 01 (two units) into section 02 (three units), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 7047: Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures

I apologize in advance for the fact that there are no paragraph breaks in this description. It is not my fault. Please contact me directly if you have questions about the class and I will email you a more readable description. Thanks, MLD. Seminar with Concurrent Policy Lab: Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures. Policy Lab Client: National Women's Law Center: Over the past six years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students) experience sexual assault. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators, launching one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. Statistics are equally disturbing in the middle and high school context. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 250 colleges and universities currently under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints. At the same time, students accused of sexual assault have complained of botched processes driven by a "campus rape over-correction" that denied them a fair disciplinary hearing. It is clear that schools are struggling to develop and implement policies and procedures that satisfy their legal obligations in this area. While the future of federal enforcement under the Trump Administration is uncertain, schools are still subject to federal and state law that require them have policies and procedures to address sexual harassment and violence. This course focuses on the legal and policy issues surrounding the highly challenging area of investigation and adjudication of sexual assault and other gender-motivated violence on college campuses and in K12 schools. It will cover the federal and state legal frameworks governing these procedures including Title IX, the Violence Against Women Act, and the Clery Act, and examine current cases as well as the rapidly-evolving legal, federal regulatory, and political environment surrounding this issue. Guest speakers working in the area will help to broaden the class's understanding of the subject matter. Students in this seminar will have the opportunity to participate in the invitation-only national conference entitled The Way Forward: Title IX Advocacy in the Trump Era, which will be held May 1-2 at Stanford Law School and is organized in conjunction with the National Women's Law Center. See [http://conferences.law.stanford.edu/thewayforward-title9/] for more information on the conference. Concurrent Seminar and Policy Lab: The seminar is taught concurrently with the Policy Lab (also entitled "Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures"). All students registered for the seminar participate in the Policy Lab, which works with the National Women's Law Center toward the development of a set of evidence-based and legally compliant model policies and procedures. Given all the controversy, surprisingly little is actually known about the policies and processes that are currently in use, nor is there any way of easily ascertaining what the majority of an institution's "peer schools" are doing with respect to solving a challenge or addressing an issue. There is no set of "best practices" to which school administrators can easily turn. Students will analyze cutting-edge issues related to school-based gender-motivated violence and work on a white paper for the NWLC that includes both legal and empirical research into the policies and procedures currently in use around the country. Throughout the class, students will have the opportunity to reflect on what they are learning and how it applies in a professional context. The eventual goal of this Policy Lab is the development in conjunction with NWLC of a free, web-based, open-source set of adaptable model policies and procedures that are targeted for different market segments (i.e., large private, large public, small private, HBCU, community colleges, and k12). Course Schedule and Optional Travel: The first three weeks of the class there will be two meetings per week, on Tuesday and Thursday from 4:15 to 6:15. Students will meet with Fatima Goss Graves, Senior Vice President for Program at the NWLC during week 2 to hear her expectations regarding the project and ask questions. During weeks 4-6 the class will meet once per week, on Thursday from 4:15-7:15 and small groups will work on their assigned sections of the project. On Thursday, May 4 (week 5), the class will meet with special guest Catherine Lhamon, former Assistant Secretary of Education for Civil Rights and have the opportunity to discuss the project with her and receive her feedback. During Week 7, the class will take an optional trip to Washington DC to present the completed project to the staff of the NWLC on Friday May 19. The class will be housed at Stanford in Washington from Thursday May 18, and will attend a hearing of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in the morning of May 19 and then present their project in the afternoon. Travel expenses (other than incidentals) are provided. On Saturday, May 20 we will have the option to meet with other policy makers and activists as well as sightsee (including an attempted visit to the National Museum of African American History). We will return to Stanford on Sunday May 21. There will be no class during week 8. Enrollment, Assignments, and Evaluation; The Seminar and concurrent policy lab are both open to law students, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates. The seminar has two sections. Section 1 is a 2-hour seminar and students enrolling in Section 1 must also enroll in the Law 805R Policy Lab (1-hour). Section 2 is a 3-hour seminar, and students may enroll in that Section without concurrent enrollment in the Policy Lab. Regardless of the section of enrollment, all students will do the same assignments and be evaluated on the same criteria. All students will complete written work equivalent to a 26 page research paper. Law students will receive "R" credit for the seminar. Elements used in grading: Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Dauber, M. (PI)

MED 51B: Compassionate Presence at the Bedside: The Healer's Art

Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice compassionate and respectful communication strategies, learn how to be a cam, compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of seriously ill patients. We believe that medical school curricula do not have a strong focus on essential doctoring skills related to communication and a compassionate presence at the bedside. By offering this course to pre-med students, we believe that the doctors of the future will become skilled and compassionate healers.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Periyakoil, V. (PI)

PSYCH 150B: RACE AND CRIME PRACTICUM (CSRE 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in Psych 150: Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students will participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. nnPrerequisite: Psych 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 157: Ending Poverty with Technology (PUBLPOL 147)

There are growing worries that new technologies may eliminate work, increase inequality, and create a large dependent class subsisting on transfers. But can technology instead be turned against itself and used to end poverty? This class explores the sources of domestic poverty and then examines how new technologies might be developed to eliminate poverty completely. We first survey existing poverty-reducing products and then attempt to imagine new products that might end poverty by equalizing access to information, reducing transaction costs, or equalizing access to training. In a follow-up class in the spring quarter, students who choose to continue will select the most promising ideas, continue to develop them, and begin the design task within Stanford¿s new Poverty and Technology Lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Grusky, D. (PI)

SPANLANG 13SL: Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on Service Learning, Third Quarter

Continuation of SPANLANG 12. Integration of community engagement and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and professional contexts. SL content focuses on immersion in civics-based reciprocity and service learning in the Spanish-speaking local community. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 12C, 12R, 12M or 12S. Fulfills the IR major Language Requirement.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brates, V. (PI)

TAPS 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (AMSTUD 197, DANCE 197)

This class works collaboratively with a local juvenile hall to use civic engagement and performance to explore the aesthetic, cultural and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration on an immediate and personal scale. Taught jointly by a Dance Studies scholar and a lawyer specializing in Juvenile Justice, we will consider what unique understandings are possible if we position the arts as central to an exploration of punishment, rehabilitation and recidivism in America. The course will examine case studies, historical and contemporary narratives about the social, imaginative and behavioral change possible through arts programs in prison.Half of the class meetings will be in Hillcrest Juvenile Hall in San Mateo, where our class will join with a group of 13-18 year old youths currently detained there. Dance will be used to help shape their individual expressive voices, and ours, through collaborative hip hop dance classes. Books to be read are Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson, and Last Chance in Texas by John Hubner.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ross, J. (PI)
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