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AFRICAAM 21: African American Vernacular English (CSRE 21, LINGUIST 65)

The English vernacular spoken by African Americans in big city settings, and its relation to Creole English dialects spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The history of expressive uses of African American English (in soundin' and rappin'), and its educational implications. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 106: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 130: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (CSRE 130, EDUC 123, EDUC 322)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (CSRE 245, EDUC 245)

African American, Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American racial and ethnic identity development; the influence of social, political and psychological forces in shaping the experience of people of color in the U.S. The importance of race in relationship to social identity variables including gender, class, and occupational, generational, and regional identifications. Bi- and multiracial identity status, and types of white racial consciousness.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

CHILATST 183X: Practicum in English-Spanish School & Community Interpreting (EDUC 183, EDUC 257)

This practicum will assist students in developing a set of skills in English-Spanish interpreting that will prepare them to provide interpretation services in school and community settings. The course will build students' abilities to transfer intended meanings between two or more monolingual individuals of who are physically present in a school or community setting and who must communicate with each other for professional (and personal) purposes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

CSRE 21: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, LINGUIST 65)

The English vernacular spoken by African Americans in big city settings, and its relation to Creole English dialects spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The history of expressive uses of African American English (in soundin' and rappin'), and its educational implications. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 130: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (AFRICAAM 130, EDUC 123, EDUC 322)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

CSRE 203A: The Changing Face of America: Building Leaders for Civil Rights and Education

For students with leadership potential who have studied these topics in lecture format. Race discrimination strategies, their relation to education reform initiatives, and the role of media in shaping racial attitudes in the U.S. A service-learning component will be offered as an option in this course in partnership with East Palo Alto organizations.nnApplication Required by March 20th! Please submit a 1 page statement with "CSRE 203A" in the subject line that details your reasons for applying and what leadership skills, experience, and perspectives you would contribute to the course, to: nnProf. Jim Steyer: jim@commonsense.orgnDr. Anna Waring: drannalwaring@yahoo.com
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Steyer, J. (PI)

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245)

African American, Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American racial and ethnic identity development; the influence of social, political and psychological forces in shaping the experience of people of color in the U.S. The importance of race in relationship to social identity variables including gender, class, and occupational, generational, and regional identifications. Bi- and multiracial identity status, and types of white racial consciousness.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

EDUC 103A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 203A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 104: Introduction to the Profession of Teaching

This course explores the profession of teaching through an internship in a local elementary or high school classroom. Students will observe and assist instruction for four hours per week. In class, students will read, discuss, and respond to theory and research related to teaching. The course is open to all undergraduates with an interest in the teaching profession; and it may be especially useful for students who are considering entering the profession of teaching and wish to spend time in a classroom. No prior experience in teaching is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Johnson, E. (PI)

EDUC 115N: How to Learn Mathematics

What is going on in mathematics education in the United States? Why do so many people hate and fear math? What contributes to the high levels of innumeracy in the general population? Why do girls and women opt out of math when they get a chance? In this seminar we will consider seminal research on math learning in K-12 classrooms, including a focus on equity. We will spend time investigating cases of teaching and learning, through watching videos and visiting schools. This seminar is for those who are interested in education, and who would like to learn about ways to help students (and maybe yourselves?) learn and enjoy mathematics. If you have had bad math experiences and would like to understand them ¿ and put them behind you ¿ this seminar will be particularly good for you. The final project for this class will involve developing a case of one or more math learners, investigating their journeys in the world of math.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boaler, J. (PI)

EDUC 123: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (AFRICAAM 130, CSRE 130, EDUC 322)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

EDUC 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EDUC 171: Preschool Counts: Engaging Young Children in Math

Restricted to students who participate in a service learning program focused on early math learning. Training for activities in preschool classrooms. Focus is on the teaching of math to young children, but also includes background on issues related to young children's cognitive, language, and social development; classroom management; cultural diversity; and early childhood education programs. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 180S: Pre-field Course for Alternative Spring Break

Limited to students participating in the Alternative Spring Break program. See http://asb.stanford.edu for more inform
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 183: Practicum in English-Spanish School & Community Interpreting (CHILATST 183X, EDUC 257)

This practicum will assist students in developing a set of skills in English-Spanish interpreting that will prepare them to provide interpretation services in school and community settings. The course will build students' abilities to transfer intended meanings between two or more monolingual individuals of who are physically present in a school or community setting and who must communicate with each other for professional (and personal) purposes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 203A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 103A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 208B: Curriculum Construction

The theories and methods of curriculum development and improvement. Topics: curriculum ideologies, perspectives on design, strategies for diverse learners, and the politics of curriculum construction and implementation. Students develop curriculum plans for use in real settings. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pope, D. (PI)

EDUC 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, CSRE 245)

African American, Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American racial and ethnic identity development; the influence of social, political and psychological forces in shaping the experience of people of color in the U.S. The importance of race in relationship to social identity variables including gender, class, and occupational, generational, and regional identifications. Bi- and multiracial identity status, and types of white racial consciousness.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 281: Technology for Learners

How can we use technology to improve learning? Many hope that technology will make learning easier, faster, or accessible to more learners. This course explores a variety of approaches to designing tools for learning, the theories behind them, and the research that tests their effectiveness. Strong focus on evaluating and designing new tools for specific learners and subjects.nnSpace is limited. Priority is given to master¿s students in Education and to master¿s / upper-level students in Human Computer Interaction.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 303: Designing Learning Spaces

Project-based. How space shapes personal interactions and affords learning opportunities In formal and informal settings. How to integrate learning principles into the design of spaces and develop a rubric to assess the impact on learning.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 322: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (AFRICAAM 130, CSRE 130, EDUC 123)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

EDUC 332: Theory and Practice of Environmental Education

Foundational understanding of the history, theoretical underpinnings, and practice of environmental education as a tool for addressing today's pressing environmental issues. The purpose, design, and implementation of environmental education in formal and nonformal settings with youth and adult audiences. Field trip and community-based project offer opportunities for experiencing and engaging with environmental education initiatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ardoin, N. (PI)

EDUC 337: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 65: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, CSRE 21)

The English vernacular spoken by African Americans in big city settings, and its relation to Creole English dialects spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The history of expressive uses of African American English (in soundin' and rappin'), and its educational implications. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SPANLANG 11SL: Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on Service Learning, First Quarter

Continuation of SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A. Identity and community. Sequence integrating community engagement, culture and language with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and academic contexts. SL content focuses on artistic projects with Spanish-speaking youth organizations in the local community. Requires one evening off campus per week in addition to four hours of regular class time. Projects may vary from quarter to quarter (e.g., mural art, print-making, digital storytelling, etc.) but focus on themes surrounding community and youth identity. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Del Carpio, C. (PI)

URBANST 104: Civic Dreams, Human Spaces: Urban Design with People

Human-centered design of cities and public spaces. Explore the principles underlying vibrant spaces, utilize creative tools and techniques to strengthen the social fabric of communities and enhance benefits to the public, and find new sources of inspiration to inform the urban design process. Take part in real-world design projects in the city of San Francisco and/or other Bay Area communities, while decoding public spaces from multiple perspectives: as sites of recreation, interaction, and political contention; as physical infrastructure that municipalities or grassroots citizen efforts seek to build and maintain for the common good; as places of historical memory, identity, and personal storytelling; and as opportunities for cutting-edge civic innovation. Participants will practice ethical design, utilizing frameworks that are inclusive (for many) and participatory (by many), and that benefit human beings and their diverse communities. Limited enrollment, admission by application. Find out more and apply at dschool.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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