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AFRICAAM 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (CS 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, C. (PI)

AFRICAAM 106: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 157P: Solidarity and Racial Justice (AMSTUD 157P, CSRE 157P, FEMGEN 157P)

Is multiracial solidarity necessary to overcome oppression that disproportionately affects certain communities of color? What is frontline leadership and what role should people play if they are not part of frontline communities? In this course we will critically examine practices of solidarity and allyship in movements for collective liberation. Through analysis of historical and contemporary movements, as well as participation in movement work, we will see how movements have built multiracial solidarity to address issues that are important to the liberation of all. We will also see how racial justice intersects with other identities and issues. This course is for students that want to learn how to practice solidarity, whether to be better allies or to work more effectively with allies. There will be a community engaged learning option for this course. Students who choose to participate in this option will either work with Stanford's DGen Office or a community organization that is explicitly devoted to multiracial movement-building.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marquez, R. (PI)

AFRICAAM 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (CSRE 245, EDUC 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

AFRICAST 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAST 142: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice (AFRICAST 242, CSRE 142C, INTNLREL 142)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAST 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAST 242: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice (AFRICAST 142, CSRE 142C, INTNLREL 142)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 157P: Solidarity and Racial Justice (AFRICAAM 157P, CSRE 157P, FEMGEN 157P)

Is multiracial solidarity necessary to overcome oppression that disproportionately affects certain communities of color? What is frontline leadership and what role should people play if they are not part of frontline communities? In this course we will critically examine practices of solidarity and allyship in movements for collective liberation. Through analysis of historical and contemporary movements, as well as participation in movement work, we will see how movements have built multiracial solidarity to address issues that are important to the liberation of all. We will also see how racial justice intersects with other identities and issues. This course is for students that want to learn how to practice solidarity, whether to be better allies or to work more effectively with allies. There will be a community engaged learning option for this course. Students who choose to participate in this option will either work with Stanford's DGen Office or a community organization that is explicitly devoted to multiracial movement-building.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marquez, R. (PI)

AMSTUD 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (DANCE 197, TAPS 197)

This class uses the lens of performance, and particularly dance, to explore the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration and its cultural dimensions. Class readings and discussions foreground the legal and social contexts surrounding prisons in the U.S., Particular attention will be paid to the nexus of art, community, and social action, and how dance might be used to study the performing arts effects on self-construction, perception, experiences of embodiment, and social control for incarcerated teenagers. The class includes guest speakers who bring important perspectives on criminal justice including returned citizens, a juvenile justice attorney, a restorative conferencing facilitator and a dancer who teaches women in prison to be their own dance instructors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 123C: "Third World Problems?" Environmental Anthropology and the Intersectionality of Justice (CSRE 123C)

As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as natural resource, public good, human right, need, or commodity - determine the contours of such regimes? We will also study chronic, quieter environmental problems and the responses they (do not) generate. Working through a variety of writing genres - ethnographies, policy literature, and legal and corporate publicity material - will enable students to appreciate what anthropology can contribute to the conversation on environmental justice, and state and corporate bureaucracies and their mandates. The course draws on examples from a wide range of settings. The course is offered as an introduction to environmental anthropology and takes students through key themes - infrastructure, race, class, privatization, justice, violence - by focusing on water. It requires no background in anthropology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hayat, M. (PI)

BIO 53: Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects. This course is identical to Bio 7N, so students enrolled in the former should not take this course. Open to undergraduates and graduate students. Students must have access to a DSLR camera and lenses - we can accept up to 20 students who can share 10 course-provided cameras and lenses, by application. Application for camera use: https://forms.gle/1yAD3my8GoDseXw59.
Terms: Spr, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 118Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 124X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 224X)

Note to students: please be advised that the course number for this course has been changed to: CEE 218X, which is offered Autumn 2019-20. If you are interested in taking this course, please enroll in CEE 218X instead for Autumn 2019-20.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 177S: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 277S, ENGR 177B, ENGR 277B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 177X: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 277X, ENGR 177A, ENGR 277A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation, evaluation, and deployment. Admission is by application. Following successful completion of CEE 177X/277X, students have the option to enroll in CEE 177S/277S Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 218Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 224X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 124X)

Note to students: please be advised that the course number for this course has been changed to: CEE 218X, which is offered Autumn 2019-20. If you are interested in taking this course, please enroll in CEE 218X instead for Autumn 2019-20.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 265F: Environmental Governance and Climate Resilience (POLISCI 227B, PUBLPOL 265F)

Adaptation to climate change will not only require new infrastructure and policies, but it will also challenge our local, state and national governments to collaborate across jurisdictional lines in ways that include many different types of private and nonprofit organizations and individual actors. The course explores what it means for communities to be resilient and how they can reach that goal in an equitable and effective way. Using wildfires in California as a case study, the course assesses specific strategies, such as controlled burns and building codes, and a range of planning and policy measures that can be used to enhance climate resilience. In addition, it considers how climate change and development of forested exurban areas (among other factors) have influenced the size and severity of wildfires. The course also examines the obstacles communities face in selecting and implementing adaptation measures (e.g., resource constraints, incentives to develop in forested areas, inadequate policy enforcement, and weak inter-agency coordination). Officials from various Bay Area organizations contribute to aspects of the course; and students will present final papers to local government offcials. Limited enrollment. Students will be asked to prepare application essays on the first day of class. Course is intended for seniors and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 277S: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 177S, ENGR 177B, ENGR 277B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 277X: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 177X, ENGR 177A, ENGR 277A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation, evaluation, and deployment. Admission is by application. Following successful completion of CEE 177X/277X, students have the option to enroll in CEE 177S/277S Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHILATST 1SI: English Language Learner Tutoring and Curriculum Development

The principal purpose of this course is to support Habla tutors in developing lesson plans and strategies to implement during their tutoring sessions with English language learners. The course equips students with a foundational understanding of English as a second language, practical experience with developing educational materials for language learning, and a collaborative space to reflect on the tutoring experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

CHILATST 177A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CSRE 177E, EDUC 177A, HUMBIO 29A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schell, E. (PI)

CHILATST 177B: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CSRE 177F, EDUC 177B)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schell, E. (PI)

CHILATST 198: Internship for Public Service (CSRE 198)

Students should consult with CCSRE Director of Community Engaged Learning (ddmurray@stanford.edu) to develop or gain approval for an internship that addresses race/ethnicity, public service, and social justice. Students will read a selection of short readings relevant to their placement, write bi-weekly reflections, and meet bi-weekly with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Units are determined by the number of hours per week at the internship (2 hours/week = 1 unit; 5 hours/week = 2 units; 8 hours/week = 3 units; etc.) Group meetings may be required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marquez, R. (PI)

CHPR 227: The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research (HRP 272)

The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research course will focus on how the science of community engagement can be applied to diverse health-related research topics across the translational spectrum with the ultimate goal of high quality research that transforms human health and addresses health disparities. The course will provide historical context, theoretical frameworks, foundational skills in diverse community engagement methodologies, and tools for examining the effectiveness of various engagement strategies aimed. Specifically, the course will cover: 1) Historical context for community engagement in health-related research; 2) Evolution of community engagement as a science; 3) Theoretical frameworks for various community engagement approaches; 4) Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR); 5) Community engagement strategies for different stages of translational research; and 6) Evaluation of various engagement strategies; and 7) Ethics of community engagement. Students will gain practical experience in various community engagement tools and strategies to help guide the development of a community engagement plan responsive to community needs. Challenges and benefits of establishing community partnerships will be highlighted by real-world examples. nThe course will include lectures; interactive student-led presentations and guided exercises; class discussions among invited speakers, students and instructors; individual and group assignments; and organized small-group and experiential activities. Course readings will demonstrate the need and opportunity for interdisciplinary community engagement approaches and will illustrate how to conduct innovative community-engaged research. nThe Science of Community Engagement course is intended to reach students with diverse research interests, including clinical research, community health, health research and policy, epidemiology, prevention research, environmental health, etc.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rosas, L. (PI)

COMM 106: Communication Research Methods (COMM 206)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 138: Deliberative Democracy Practicum: Applying Deliberative Polling (COMM 238)

In this course, students will work directly on a real-world deliberative democracy project using the method of Deliberative Polling. Students in this course will work in partnership with the Center for Deliberative Democracy at Stanford, a research center devoted to the research in democracy and public opinion around the world. This unique practicum will allow students to work on an actual Deliberative Polling project on campus. In just one quarter, the students will prepare for, implement, and analyze the results for an Deliberative Polling project. This is a unique opportunity that allows students to take part in the entire process of a deliberative democracy project. Through this practicum, students will learn and apply quantitative and qualitative research methods. Students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in deliberative democracy, community and stakeholder engagement, and the practical aspects of working in local communities. This practicum is a collaboration between the Center for Deliberative Democracy and the Haas Center for Public Service. CDD website: http://cdd.stanford.edu; Hass Center website: https://haas.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Siu, A. (PI); Terra, L. (PI)

COMM 177I: Investigative Watchdog Reporting (COMM 277I)

Graduate students register for COMM 277I.) Learn how to apply an investigative and data mindset to journalism, from understanding how to background an individual or entity using online databases to compiling or combining disparate sets of information in ways that unveil wrongdoing or mismanagement. Focuses on mining texts, tracking associations, and using visualizations. Stories produced apply investigative techniques to beat reporting, breaking news, and long form journalism. Prerequisite: COMM 104W, or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 206: Communication Research Methods (COMM 106)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CS 51: CS + Social Good Studio: Designing Social Impact Projects

Get real-world experience researching and developing your own social impact project! Students work in small teams to develop high-impact projects around problem domains provided by partner organizations, under the guidance and support of design/technical coaches from industry and non-profit domain experts. Main class components are workshops, community discussions, guest speakers and mentorship. Studio provides an outlet for students to create social change through CS while engaging in the full product development cycle on real-world projects. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their project ideas and Minimum Viable Product prototypes with stakeholders and the public. Application required; please see cs51.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cain, J. (PI)

CS 52: CS + Social Good Studio: Implementing Social Good Projects

Continuation of CS51 (CS + Social Good Studio). Teams enter the quarter having completed and tested a minimal viable product (MVP) with a well-defined target user, and a community partner. Students will learn to apply scalable technical frameworks, methods to measure social impact, tools for deployment, user acquisition techniques and growth/exit strategies. The purpose of the class is to facilitate students to build a sustainable infrastructure around their product idea. CS52 will host mentors, guest speakers and industry experts for various workshops and coaching-sessions. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their projects with stakeholders and the public. Prerequisite: CS 51, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cain, J. (PI)

CS 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (AFRICAAM 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, C. (PI)

CS 106S: Coding for Social Good

Survey course on applications of fundamental computer science concepts from CS 106B/X to problems in the social good space (such as health, government, education, and environment). Each week consists of in-class activities designed by student groups, local tech companies, and nonprofits. Introduces students to JavaScript and the basics of web development. Some of the topics we will cover include mental health chatbots, tumor classification with basic machine learning, sentiment analysis of tweets on refugees, and storytelling through virtual reality. Pre/Corequisite: CS106B or CS106X.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cain, J. (PI)

CS 184: Bridging Policy and Tech Through Design (PUBLPOL 170)

This project-based course aims to bring together students from computer science and the social sciences to work with external partner organizations at the nexus of digital technology and public policy. Students will collaborate in interdisciplinary teams on a problem with a partner organization. Along with the guidance of faculty mentors and the teaching staff, students will produce a set of deliverables ranging from policy memos and white papers to data visualizations and software. Possible projects suggested by partner organizations will be presented at an information session on Tuesday, March 3rd at 6:30 pm in Gates 415 - RSVP http://bit.ly/InfoCS184. Following the info session, a course application will open for teams to be selected before the start of Spring Quarter. Students may apply to a project with a partner organization or with a pre-formed team and their own idea to be reviewed for approval by the course staff. Applications close March 20 and successful applicants will be notified by Tuesday, March 24th. The course meets twice a week: Once with all students taking the course and a second time with the project-based team mentors. The time below is for the cross-team meetings, as the team meetings will be scheduled according to member availability. Prerequisites: Appropriate preparation depends on the nature of the project proposed, and will be verified by the teaching staff based on your application.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ullman, J. (PI)

CS 209: Law, Order, & Algorithms (CSRE 230, MS&E 330, SOC 279)

Human decision making is increasingly being displaced by predictive algorithms. Judges sentence defendants based on statistical risk scores; regulators take enforcement actions based on predicted violations; advertisers target materials based on demographic attributes; and employers evaluate applicants and employees based on machine-learned models. One concern with the rise of such algorithmic decision making is that it may replicate or exacerbate human bias. This course surveys the legal and ethical principles for assessing the equity of algorithms, describes statistical techniques for designing fair systems, and considers how anti-discrimination law and the design of algorithms may need to evolve to account for machine bias. Concepts will be developed in part through guided in-class coding exercises. Admission is by consent of instructor and is limited to 20 students. To enroll in the class, please complete the course application by March 20, available at: https://5harad.com/mse330/. Grading is based on response papers, class participation, and a final project. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent knowledge of coding.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 123C: "Third World Problems?" Environmental Anthropology and the Intersectionality of Justice (ANTHRO 123C)

As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as natural resource, public good, human right, need, or commodity - determine the contours of such regimes? We will also study chronic, quieter environmental problems and the responses they (do not) generate. Working through a variety of writing genres - ethnographies, policy literature, and legal and corporate publicity material - will enable students to appreciate what anthropology can contribute to the conversation on environmental justice, and state and corporate bureaucracies and their mandates. The course draws on examples from a wide range of settings. The course is offered as an introduction to environmental anthropology and takes students through key themes - infrastructure, race, class, privatization, justice, violence - by focusing on water. It requires no background in anthropology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hayat, M. (PI)

CSRE 125E: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 146A: Designing Research for Social Justice: Writing a Community-Based Research Proposal (URBANST 123)

Comparative perspective on research with communities and basic overview of research methodologies, with an emphasis on the principles and practices of doing community-based research as a collaborative enterprise between academic researchers and community members. How academic scholarship can be made useful to communities. How service experiences and interests can be used to develop research questions in collaboration with communities and serve as a starting point for developing senior theses or other independent research projects. Through the coursework, students are encouraged to develop a draft proposal for an actual community-based research project. The course is highly recommended for students planning to apply for community-based summer research fellowships through the Haas Center for Public Service (Community-based Research Fellowship Program). Students who complete the course will be given priority for these fellowships. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 146B: Approaching Research in the Community: Design and Methods (URBANST 123B)

This course focuses on issues of research design and how to select specific methodological strategies to assure ethical and effective partnership-based research. In this course, students will plan for their own participation in a CBRF project. Topical themes will include best practice strategies for (a) defining and selecting community problems or issues to be addressed, (b) generating relevant and useful research questions, (c) choosing specific means and methods for data collection [e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.], (d) storing, organizing and analyzing data, (e) reflecting on and critiquing research findings, and (f) carrying out dissemination in ways that can be expected to enhance community power and advance community development. Students will be provided with opportunities to workshop their respective projects-in-development, (e.g., developing and sharing research questions, data collection instruments, strategies for engaging community constituents as co-researchers, etc.). This is a required course for students participating in the Haas Center for Public Service Community-based Research Fellows Program, but enrollment is open to all Stanford students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Leon, M. (PI); Tien, J. (PI)

CSRE 157P: Solidarity and Racial Justice (AFRICAAM 157P, AMSTUD 157P, FEMGEN 157P)

Is multiracial solidarity necessary to overcome oppression that disproportionately affects certain communities of color? What is frontline leadership and what role should people play if they are not part of frontline communities? In this course we will critically examine practices of solidarity and allyship in movements for collective liberation. Through analysis of historical and contemporary movements, as well as participation in movement work, we will see how movements have built multiracial solidarity to address issues that are important to the liberation of all. We will also see how racial justice intersects with other identities and issues. This course is for students that want to learn how to practice solidarity, whether to be better allies or to work more effectively with allies. There will be a community engaged learning option for this course. Students who choose to participate in this option will either work with Stanford's DGen Office or a community organization that is explicitly devoted to multiracial movement-building.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marquez, R. (PI)

CSRE 162A: Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation (RELIGST 162X, URBANST 126)

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Karlin-Neumann, P. (PI)

CSRE 177E: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177A, EDUC 177A, HUMBIO 29A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schell, E. (PI)

CSRE 177F: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177B, EDUC 177B)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schell, E. (PI)

CSRE 178P: The Science and Practice of Effective Advocacy (PUBLPOL 178, URBANST 178)

How can purposeful collective action change government policy, business practices and cultural norms? This course will teach students about the components of successful change campaigns and help develop the practical skills to carry out such efforts. The concepts taught will be relevant to both issue advocacy and electoral campaigns, and be evidence-based, drawing on lessons from social psychology, political science, communications, community organizing and social movements. The course will meet twice-a-week for 90 minutes, and class time will combine engaged learning exercises, discussions and lectures. There will be a midterm and final. Students will be able to take the course for 3 or 5 units. Students who take the course for 5 units will participate in an advocacy project with an outside organization during the quarter, attend a related section meeting and write reflections. For 5 unit students, the section meeting is on Tuesdays, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Litvak, L. (PI)

CSRE 196C: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 198: Internship for Public Service (CHILATST 198)

Students should consult with CCSRE Director of Community Engaged Learning (ddmurray@stanford.edu) to develop or gain approval for an internship that addresses race/ethnicity, public service, and social justice. Students will read a selection of short readings relevant to their placement, write bi-weekly reflections, and meet bi-weekly with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Units are determined by the number of hours per week at the internship (2 hours/week = 1 unit; 5 hours/week = 2 units; 8 hours/week = 3 units; etc.) Group meetings may be required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 230: Law, Order, & Algorithms (CS 209, MS&E 330, SOC 279)

Human decision making is increasingly being displaced by predictive algorithms. Judges sentence defendants based on statistical risk scores; regulators take enforcement actions based on predicted violations; advertisers target materials based on demographic attributes; and employers evaluate applicants and employees based on machine-learned models. One concern with the rise of such algorithmic decision making is that it may replicate or exacerbate human bias. This course surveys the legal and ethical principles for assessing the equity of algorithms, describes statistical techniques for designing fair systems, and considers how anti-discrimination law and the design of algorithms may need to evolve to account for machine bias. Concepts will be developed in part through guided in-class coding exercises. Admission is by consent of instructor and is limited to 20 students. To enroll in the class, please complete the course application by March 20, available at: https://5harad.com/mse330/. Grading is based on response papers, class participation, and a final project. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent knowledge of coding.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

CSRE 248X: Language, Literacy, and Culture (EDUC 248)

This field-based Cardinal Course will provide a unique opportunity to combine theory and practice in the study of language, literacy, and culture in educational settings. It is a collaborative partnership between Stanford (through the Haas Center for Public Service) and the Boys and Girls Club of the Peninsula. Stanford students will work directly with children enrolled in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program at a youth center in Redwood City.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 260: Race and Ethnicity in Urban California (AFRICAAM 169A, AMSTUD 169, URBANST 169)

The course is part of an ongoing research project that examines the consequences of longterm social, economic, and political changes in ethnic and race relations in in urban California. The required readings, discussions, and service learning component all provide a platform for students to explore important issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid demographic transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McKibben, C. (PI)

DANCE 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (AMSTUD 197, TAPS 197)

This class uses the lens of performance, and particularly dance, to explore the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration and its cultural dimensions. Class readings and discussions foreground the legal and social contexts surrounding prisons in the U.S., Particular attention will be paid to the nexus of art, community, and social action, and how dance might be used to study the performing arts effects on self-construction, perception, experiences of embodiment, and social control for incarcerated teenagers. The class includes guest speakers who bring important perspectives on criminal justice including returned citizens, a juvenile justice attorney, a restorative conferencing facilitator and a dancer who teaches women in prison to be their own dance instructors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTH 5: Geokids: Earth Sciences Education

Service learning through the Geokids program. Eight weeks of supervised teaching to early elementary students about Earth sciences. Hands-on teaching strategies for science standards-based instruction.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Saltzman, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 119C: Will Work for Food: Designing Your Pathway to Impact in the Food System

Offered exclusively for juniors and seniors, the goal of this course is to help you align your Stanford experience with potential pathways for creating impact in the food system after Stanford. This course builds on the "paced education" model that emerged from the d.school's landmark exploration of education at Stanford known as Stanford 2025. It is comprised of three phases of learning, which will unfold over six to nine months, at a pace that is determined by the amount of time you need to move from one phase to the next. In the first phase (119A and/or 119B) you will assess your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities and you will broadly explore a systemic problem of interest in the food system. In the second phase (119B), you will deepen your knowledge on a specific problem by creating a personal learning plan, a series of experiments to explore the ways in your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities align with solving your problem of interest, and by developing a board of advisors to support you along the journey. In the third phase (119C), you will scope, in collaboration with a project partner, a project of real-world consequence. You must enroll in either 119A or 119B to enroll in 119C and the expectation is that you complete four units of work in total. This is a highly selective and hands-on course led by a teaching team with deep professional connections in the food system and who will act as your coaches, mentors, and connectors. Please visit http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/ to apply. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Select applicants will be interviewed. Decisions will be made one week prior to the start of the quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 125: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (CSRE 125E, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 155: Science of Soils (ESS 155)

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate. Recommended: introductory chemistry and biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chan, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 182A: Ecological Farm Systems

This is project-based course in sustainable agricultural systems. This course typically takes place on the Stanford Educational Farm but this spring, with the current COVID-19 situation and the temporary closure of the farm, it will be an asynchronous online course. Students will work on projects based on their interests with the support of the course teaching team.nnnStudents will work individually or in groups on projects of their choosing. Potential projects include home or community garden development (where possible), independent research, literature reviews, farm system designs, proposals, resource guides, and/or curricula for farm programs. Projects will be scaled so that they can be completed during the quarter and students can work on more than one project. The course application (link below) includes a list of several potential projects and students are welcome to propose their own ideas.nn nnCourse Application Link: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_erBTivsSTI2HLO5
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 210A: Senior Capstone and Reflection

The Earth Systems Senior Capstone and Reflection, required of all seniors, provides students with opportunities to synthesize and reflect on their learning in the major. Students participate in guided career development and planning activities and initiate work on an independent or group capstone project related to an Earth Systems problem or question of interest. In addition, students learn and apply principles of effective oral communication through developing and giving a formal presentation on their internship. Students must also take EARTHSYS 210P, Earth Systems Capstone Project, in the quarter following the Senior Capstone and Reflection Course. Prerequisite: Completion of an approved Earth Systems internship (EARTHSYS 260).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 210B: Senior Capstone and Reflection

The Earth Systems Senior Capstone and Reflection, required of all seniors, provides students with opportunities to synthesize and reflect on their learning in the major. Students participate in guided career development and planning activities and initiate work on an independent or group capstone project related to an Earth Systems problem or question of interest. In addition, students learn and apply principles of effective oral communication through developing and giving a formal presentation on their internship. Students must also take EARTHSYS 210P, Earth Systems Capstone Project, in the quarter following the Senior Capstone and Reflection Course. Prerequisite: Completion of an approved Earth Systems internship (EARTHSYS 260).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Nevle, R. (PI)

EARTHSYS 210P: Earth Systems Capstone Project

Students work independently or in groups to complete their Senior Capstone Projects. They will participate in regular advising meetings with the instructor(s), and will give a final presentation on their projects at the end of the quarter in a special Earth Systems symposium. Prerequisite: EARTHSYS 210A, B, or C.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 225: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (CSRE 125E, EARTHSYS 125, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 290: Master's Seminar

Required of and open only to Earth Systems co-terminal MS and MA students. This course has several elements, including, skill building through experiential learning and reflection and professional development. Students will work in teams with a community partner to complete a well-defined, manageable, but important project. Our community partners have requested help with achieving their missions and seminar students will utilize their backgrounds in social/environmental problem solving to deliver a final product. Our partners have requested help with such efforts as grant writing, data analysis, curriculum development, symposium organizing, presentation research and preparation and communications to raise awareness about an environmental challenge. Students will also explore how best to communicate their interdisciplinary skills and goals through their resumes, cv¿s or cover letters, portfolios or linkedIn profiles in preparation for the next phase of their career. Guest speakers and an in class simulation will complement these activities.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 97: Science Education through Community Service

This course is about science teaching and learning in non-classroom settings. You will use the research on teaching and learning to make STEM experiences relevant to more learners, create and facilitate a learner-centered approach to science experiences in an informal setting, and practice being a culturally responsive teacher. In addition, you'll become familiar with current trends in US science education, examine your how stance on teaching and what it takes to be an effective teacher, and consider your own growth as a teacher and as someone who interacts with area youth through community service. You will spend one day a week working with two youth working alongside your peers in an after-school enrichment program for low income youth. This is a Cardinal Course, supported through the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 100A: EAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education

Education and Society Theme (EAST) House seminar. In autumn quarter, faculty and other scholars from around the University discuss the latest issues, debates, and research in the field of Education. In winter quarter, the theme is "Ten Careers in Education in Ten Weeks." Each week will feature a speaker from a different sector in education including school administration, arts education, information technology, special education, international development, student affairs, education consulting, and education policy. In the spring, the seminar will focus on Human Rights Education. Through an examination of these topics, students are able to share and develop their varied interests in educational research, policy, and practice. Notes: Attendance at first class required. Seminar meets in the EAST House Dining Hall located at 554 Governor's Ave. The seminar is open to all students at Stanford with first-priority given to pre-assign residents of EAST House followed by other residents of EAST and all other undergraduates. Graduate students are allowed to enroll on a space-available basis. Visitors/auditors are not allowed. The seminar is required for all pre-assigned residents of EAST House and is repeatable for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 102: Examining Social Structures, Power, and Educational Access

Goal is to prepare Education and Youth Development fellows for their work with adolescents in the Haas Center's pre-college summer programs and to define their role in addressing educational inequities in the summer programs and beyond.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 103A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 203A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scott, R. (PI)

EDUC 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 104: Introduction to the Profession of Teaching

This course explores the profession of teaching through an internship in a local elementary or high school classroom. Students will observe and assist instruction for four hours per week. In class, students will read, discuss, and respond to theory and research related to teaching. The course is open to all undergraduates with an interest in the teaching profession; and it may be especially useful for students who are considering entering the profession of teaching and wish to spend time in a classroom. No prior experience in teaching is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gargroetzi, E. (PI)

EDUC 122Q: Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (HISTORY 52Q, POLISCI 20Q)

This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ehrlich, T. (PI)

EDUC 129: Boost Youth College Readiness through Effective Mathematics Tutoring

Students will participate in one-on-one tutoring in mathematics with an elementary or middle school student who is enrolled in the East Palo Alto Tennis and Tutoring program (EPATT). They will attend class one evening a week, during which they will learn about the teaching of mathematics and effective tutoring strategies. They will also engage in ongoing reflection about the effectiveness of their tutoring and its impact on their tutee's college and career readiness.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Borko, H. (PI)

EDUC 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 148: Ingl├ęs Personal: Coaching Everyday Community English (CHILATST 148, CSRE 148D)

Theoretical foundation for volunteer tutors of English language learners in urban environments working with children in school-based programs or adults in community-based settings. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 171: Preschool Counts: Engaging Young Children in Math

Restricted to students who participate in a service learning program focused on early math learning. Training for activities in preschool classrooms. Focus is on the teaching of math to young children, but also includes background on issues related to young children's cognitive, language, and social development; classroom management; cultural diversity; and early childhood education programs. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 177A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177A, CSRE 177E, HUMBIO 29A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schell, E. (PI)

EDUC 177B: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177B, CSRE 177F)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schell, E. (PI)

EDUC 195A: Origins and Legacies of Educational Progressivism: A Community Engaged Learning Course

This course is about educational progressivism: its origins and competing factions, and the ways it continues to shape schooling today. This is a Cardinal Course, or community engaged learning course. Students will spend time each week in a local school in order to better understand how progressivism continues to influence the structure and practice of schooling, as well as the capacity of teachers and administrators to adopt, ignore, or repurpose progressive ideas to suit their needs.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 203A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 103A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scott, R. (PI)

EDUC 208B: Curriculum Construction

The theories and methods of curriculum development and improvement. Topics: curriculum ideologies, perspectives on design, strategies for diverse learners, and the politics of curriculum construction and implementation. Students develop curriculum plans for use in real settings. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 210: Policy, Organization, and Leadership Studies Workshop

Required for POLS students. Scaffolds applied research for POLS field projects. Students may enroll for a total of up to eight (8) units across Winter and Spring quarters. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 220D: History of School Reform: Origins, Policies, Outcomes, and Explanations (HISTORY 258E)

Strongly recommended for students in the POLS M.A. program; others welcome. Focus is on 20th-century U.S. Intended and unintended patterns in school change; the paradox of reform that schools are often reforming but never seem to change much; rhetorics of reform and factors that inhibit change. Case studies emphasize the American high school. This course is strongly recommended for POLS students pursuing K -12 leadership.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beckham, K. (PI)

EDUC 230: Learning Experience Design

This course explores the design of tools for learning, leveraging scholarship and real-world projects to create prototypes of new digital learning tools. Students will engage in design activities to come up with prototypes of new learning tools for community partners. Designing these tools will require project groups to gather and apply knowledge, evaluating options and synthesizing ideas in order to create an effective (and elegant!) solution. A community-based Cardinal Course. To learn about the design of digital tools for learning, we recommend taking this course together with EDUC 281, Technology for Learners
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, CSRE 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

EDUC 248: Language, Literacy, and Culture (CSRE 248X)

This field-based Cardinal Course will provide a unique opportunity to combine theory and practice in the study of language, literacy, and culture in educational settings. It is a collaborative partnership between Stanford (through the Haas Center for Public Service) and the Boys and Girls Club of the Peninsula. Stanford students will work directly with children enrolled in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program at a youth center in Redwood City.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 281: Technology for Learners

How can we use technology to improve learning? Many hope that technology will make learning easier, faster, or accessible to more learners. This course explores a variety of approaches to designing tools for learning, the theories behind them, and the research that tests their effectiveness. Strong focus on evaluating new tools for specific learners and subjects. Space is limited. Priority is given to master's students in the LDT Master's Program. To learn about the design of digital tools for learning, we recommend taking this course together with EDUC 230, Learning Experience Design.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 335: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 337: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 340: Psychology and American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health (NATIVEAM 240, PSYCH 272)

Western medicine's definition of health as the absence of sickness, disease, or pathology; Native American cultures' definition of health as the beauty of physical, spiritual, emotional, and social things, and sickness as something out of balance. Topics include: historical trauma; spirituality and healing; cultural identity; values and acculturation; and individual, school, and community-based interventions. Prerequisite: experience working with American Indian communities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 377C: Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum

(Same as GSBGEN 381). A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Philanthropy is resource, background, age, profession, and industry agnostic, and ¿Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum¿ will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and this course will empower you with the perspective, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential both immediately and over your lifetime. You will be exposed to a diverse array of giving models and approaches, and be given structured space to weigh and appraise your individual philanthropic point of view and approach. Through deep introspection, you will define and/or refine your social change purpose and create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values, beliefs and resources (including intellectual, human, network, experiential and financial capital) into measurable social value. Class activities will include debates and simulations such as discussing the benefits and challenges of diverse giving models, creating personal giving strategies, giving fundraising pitches and assessing actual foundation grant proposals. Each student will select and complete due diligence on a local nonprofit and create a formal grant proposal. Students will peer-review grant proposals, participate in a multi-stage grantmaking process and allocate $20,000 of grants funded by the Learning by Giving Foundation and Andreessen Philanthropies. Students will also have the unique opportunity to directly connect and engage with globally renowned philanthropic leaders, including Darren Walker (Ford Foundation), Laura Muñoz Arnold (Arnold Ventures), Justin Steele (Google.org), Crystal Hayling (Libra Foundation) and Holden Karnofsky (Open Philanthropy Project), among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 450C: Qualitative Interviewing

Addressing the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative interviews as well as the application of theory to practice, this course considers different approaches to interviewing. Interview types covered will range from group interviews to individual interviews, and from unstructured, ethnographically oriented interviews to highly structured interviews. Working with community partners to facilitate application to practice, the students will move from theory to interview design, implementation, and initial stages of analysis, with an emphasis on consistency in approach and utility in graduate-level research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 470: Practicum

For advanced graduate students. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Atkin, J. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Bridges, E. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Brown, N. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Davis, S. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Gage, N. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Greeno, J. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Heath, S. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Levin, H. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); March, J. (PI); Martinez, A. (PI); Massy, W. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Noddings, N. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Perez-Granados, D. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Reich, R. (PI); Rickford, J. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rohlen, T. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Shulman, L. (PI); Simms, W. (PI); Spindler, G. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Stout, F. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thoresen, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Weiler, H. (PI); Williamson, J. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EE 46: Engineering For Good: Contributing to Saving the World and Having Fun Doing It

Projects that provide immediate and positive impact on the world. Focus is on global health and sustainable development by learning from experts in these fields. Students work on real-world projects with help from members of NGOs and social entrepreneurial companies as part of the hand-on learning experience. Prerequisite: ENGR 21 or ENGR 40M or EE 122A or CS 106B or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Le, M. (PI)

EMED 114SI: On the Path to Medical School

This is a course for all prospective pre-medical students, including undergraduate and graduate students, who seek knowledge and guidance on their path to medical school, with an opt-in component to work alongside (remotely during Covid-19) doctors in the Emergency Room at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. Discussions, presentations, and lectures will help students discover how to integrate service with pursuing medicine, whether the pre-medical path is right for them, and if so, how best to navigate the pre-med requirements. In addition, in collaboration with physician advisors and medical students, we have designed a series of presentations on topics including strategically approaching pre-medical classes and extracurriculars, studying for the MCAT, optimizing the medical school application, preparing for medical school interviews, and evidence-based pros and cons of careers in medicine and differences between specialties. This course is a one-stop-shop for getting all the information needed to become an efficient, successful pre-medical student while also gaining clinical experience as students consider whether medicine is right for them and navigate the path to medical school. Currently, to our knowledge, there are no classes directly targeted towards guiding students at every stage of the premed path in this way while also providing an active volunteer learning experience, and yet pre-meds are among the largest group of pre-professional students at Stanford. Due to COVID, our active volunteer component is on hold for the summer. Must be a member of SCOPE, please apply at https://scope.beagooddoctor.org/apply/
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Weiss, E. (PI)

EMED 125: Social Emergency Medicine and Community Engagement

The Stanford Health Advocates and Research in the Emergency Department (SHAR(ED)) program is focused on the practical application of and research in social emergency medicine. Emergency Departments (EDs) are the nation's safety nets for medical as well as social needs. EDs remain the sole access to any medical care for those in need, 24/7, regardless of insurance status. The ED is a unique bridge to the public and is a compelling site for community partnership, clinical and health services research geared towards impacting population health and policy. Through direct patient contact and community engagement, students help to meet the social needs of ED patients. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, N. (PI)

EMED 161A: Community Health Advocacy

MED161 Community Health Advocacy is a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service agencies, students will broaden and deepen their understanding of the structural determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Students will participate in weekly activities that support the mission of their placement organization, engage in direct service with clients, and collaborate on the design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly classroom sessions will serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EMED 161B: Community Health Advocacy

MED161 Community Health Advocacy is a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service agencies, students will broaden and deepen their understanding of the structural determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Students will participate in weekly activities that support the mission of their placement organization, engage in direct service with clients, and collaborate on the design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly classroom sessions will serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 161C: Community Health Advocacy

MED161 Community Health Advocacy is a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service agencies, students will broaden and deepen their understanding of the structural determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Students will participate in weekly activities that support the mission of their placement organization, engage in direct service with clients, and collaborate on the design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly classroom sessions will serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 203: Stanford Energy Ventures

Solving the global energy challenge will require the creation and successful scale-up of hundreds of new ventures. This project-based course provides a launchpad for the development and creation of transformational energy ventures and innovation models. Interdisciplinary teams will research, analyze, and develop detailed launch plans for high-impact opportunities in the context of the new energy venture development framework offered in this course. Please see the course website https://sev.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 172D: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 190SL: Light Through Language: Service Learning Through Creative Writing

This course merges the art of creative writing with service learning in the greater Bay Area. Students travel to St. Basil School in Vallejo three times over the course of the quarter and complete 15 total hours of fieldwork, providing classroom guidance and support to 6th-8th grade Language Arts students. Students will also collaborate and lead short writing activities in the field, developing a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity while discovering what it means to be a socially-engaged artist. The course culminates in an on-campus public reading featuring Stanford students and St. Basil students. Note: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Trahan, J. (PI)

ENGR 110: Perspectives in Assistive Technology (ENGR 110) (ENGR 210)

Seminar and student project course. Explores the medical, social, ethical, and technical challenges surrounding the design, development, and use of technologies that improve the lives of people with disabilities and older adults. Guest lecturers include engineers, clinicians, and individuals with disabilities. Field trips to local facilities, an assistive technology faire, and a film screening. Students from any discipline are welcome to enroll. 3 units for students (juniors, seniors, and graduate students preferred) who pursue a team-based assistive technology project with a community partner - enrollment limited to 24. 1 unit for seminar attendance only (CR/NC) or individual project (letter grade). Total enrollment limited to classroom capacity of 50. Projects can be continued as independent study in Spring Quarter. See http://engr110.stanford.edu/. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jaffe, D. (PI)

ENGR 150: Data Challenge Lab (COMM 173E)

In this lab, students develop the practical skills of data science by solving a series of increasingly difficult, real problems. Skills developed include: data manipulation, data visualization, exploratory data analysis, and basic modeling. The data challenges each student undertakes are based upon their current skills. Students receive one-on-one coaching and see how expert practitioners solve the same challenges. Limited enrollment; application required. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 177A: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 177X, CEE 277X, ENGR 277A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation, evaluation, and deployment. Admission is by application. Following successful completion of CEE 177X/277X, students have the option to enroll in CEE 177S/277S Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 177B: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 177S, CEE 277S, ENGR 277B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 210: Perspectives in Assistive Technology (ENGR 110) (ENGR 110)

Seminar and student project course. Explores the medical, social, ethical, and technical challenges surrounding the design, development, and use of technologies that improve the lives of people with disabilities and older adults. Guest lecturers include engineers, clinicians, and individuals with disabilities. Field trips to local facilities, an assistive technology faire, and a film screening. Students from any discipline are welcome to enroll. 3 units for students (juniors, seniors, and graduate students preferred) who pursue a team-based assistive technology project with a community partner - enrollment limited to 24. 1 unit for seminar attendance only (CR/NC) or individual project (letter grade). Total enrollment limited to classroom capacity of 50. Projects can be continued as independent study in Spring Quarter. See http://engr110.stanford.edu/. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jaffe, D. (PI)

ENGR 277A: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 177X, CEE 277X, ENGR 177A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation, evaluation, and deployment. Admission is by application. Following successful completion of CEE 177X/277X, students have the option to enroll in CEE 177S/277S Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 277B: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 177S, CEE 277S, ENGR 177B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 118Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Y, CEE 218Y, ESS 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 155: Science of Soils (EARTHSYS 155)

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate. Recommended: introductory chemistry and biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 218X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FEMGEN 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, EMED 5C, HISTORY 5C, INTNLREL 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FEMGEN 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking (HISTORY 6W, HUMRTS 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C (FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

FEMGEN 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (HISTORY 7W, HUMRTS 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W (FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W (FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

FEMGEN 99: Seeds of Change

This course is a required training for student leaders of the Seeds of Change initiative. This initiative takes an interdisciplinary approach to STEM education, infusing students' technical training with leadership training through a lens of gender inequality - bringing together key components of feminist pedagogy, service-learning, and experiential education to create a transformational learning experience. In this three-quarter course (Fall, Winter, Spring), student leaders will: learn the core content featured in the Seeds of Change curriculum, reflect on their experiences as both learners and teachers of this content, hone their own leadership and group facilitation skills, and engage as researchers in the initiative's evaluation efforts. NOTE: Instructor Consent Required. Please email kpedersen@stanford.edu *Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center. See syllabus for adjusted course schedule and times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

FEMGEN 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, EMED 105C, HISTORY 105C, HUMRTS 112, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FEMGEN 157P: Solidarity and Racial Justice (AFRICAAM 157P, AMSTUD 157P, CSRE 157P)

Is multiracial solidarity necessary to overcome oppression that disproportionately affects certain communities of color? What is frontline leadership and what role should people play if they are not part of frontline communities? In this course we will critically examine practices of solidarity and allyship in movements for collective liberation. Through analysis of historical and contemporary movements, as well as participation in movement work, we will see how movements have built multiracial solidarity to address issues that are important to the liberation of all. We will also see how racial justice intersects with other identities and issues. This course is for students that want to learn how to practice solidarity, whether to be better allies or to work more effectively with allies. There will be a community engaged learning option for this course. Students who choose to participate in this option will either work with Stanford's DGen Office or a community organization that is explicitly devoted to multiracial movement-building.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marquez, R. (PI)

GEOLSCI 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GEOLSCI 218X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GEOPHYS 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GEOPHYS 118Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Y, CEE 218Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOPHYS 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 118Z: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Z, CEE 218Z, GEOPHYS 218Z)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 218X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GEOPHYS 218Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Y, CEE 218Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 218Z: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Z, CEE 218Z, GEOPHYS 118Z)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, INTNLREL 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking (FEMGEN 6W, HUMRTS 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C (FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (FEMGEN 7W, HUMRTS 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W (FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W (FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 52Q: Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (EDUC 122Q, POLISCI 20Q)

This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ehrlich, T. (PI)

HISTORY 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, EMED 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HUMRTS 112, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 203F: Nuclear Insecurity in the Bay Area and Beyond (STS 200T)

This upper-level course explores the history of radioactive contamination in the Bay Area and elsewhere. We'll examine the legacy of atomic bomb testing in our region and the current political implications of that legacy. We'll then explore the colonial and postcolonial dimensions of the nuclear age and the long-term contamination it has produced. Case studies vary yearly; they include uranium mining in Africa, nuclear testing in the Pacific, and accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima. At least one field trip!
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hecht, G. (PI)

HRP 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HRP 272: The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research (CHPR 227)

The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research course will focus on how the science of community engagement can be applied to diverse health-related research topics across the translational spectrum with the ultimate goal of high quality research that transforms human health and addresses health disparities. The course will provide historical context, theoretical frameworks, foundational skills in diverse community engagement methodologies, and tools for examining the effectiveness of various engagement strategies aimed. Specifically, the course will cover: 1) Historical context for community engagement in health-related research; 2) Evolution of community engagement as a science; 3) Theoretical frameworks for various community engagement approaches; 4) Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR); 5) Community engagement strategies for different stages of translational research; and 6) Evaluation of various engagement strategies; and 7) Ethics of community engagement. Students will gain practical experience in various community engagement tools and strategies to help guide the development of a community engagement plan responsive to community needs. Challenges and benefits of establishing community partnerships will be highlighted by real-world examples. nThe course will include lectures; interactive student-led presentations and guided exercises; class discussions among invited speakers, students and instructors; individual and group assignments; and organized small-group and experiential activities. Course readings will demonstrate the need and opportunity for interdisciplinary community engagement approaches and will illustrate how to conduct innovative community-engaged research. nThe Science of Community Engagement course is intended to reach students with diverse research interests, including clinical research, community health, health research and policy, epidemiology, prevention research, environmental health, etc.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rosas, L. (PI)

HUMBIO 26: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 29A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177A, CSRE 177E, EDUC 177A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schell, E. (PI)

HUMBIO 89: Introduction to Health Sciences Statistics

This course aims to provide a firm grounding in the foundations of probability and statistics, with a focus on analyzing data from the health sciences. Students will learn how to read, interpret, and critically evaluate the statistics in medical and biological studies. The course also prepares students to be able to analyze their own data, guiding them on how to choose the correct statistical test, avoid common statistical pitfalls, and perform basic functions in R deducer. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 122M: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (PEDS 212)

(Undergraduate students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. MD and Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rodriguez, E. (PI)

HUMBIO 124C: Global Child Health (MED 124, PEDS 124)

This course introduces students to key challenges to the health and well being of children worldwide. We explicitly focus on child and public health problems in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to reflect the global burden of disease among children. We will review the scope and magnitude of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, as well as examine regional variations. We will then identify both medical and non-medical causes, effects of, as well as interventions to address, some of the biggest child health problems. The course will also prevent an overview of the role of culture, gender, and non-state actors (NGOs, foundations, etc.) on health and health policy. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HUMRTS 108: Spanish Immersion Service-Learning: Migration, Asylum, and Human Rights at the U.S. Mexico Border

This community engaged learning workshop is open only to students who are concurrently enrolled in SPANLANG 108SL: Spanish Immersion and Asylum Law. Students who opt into HUMRTS 108 will have the opportunity to apply their advanced Spanish language skills and knowledge from the class as volunteers with the Dilley Bro Bono Project in Dilley, Texas for one week immediately following the academic term. Students will work directly with detained Spanish-speaking families seeking asylum to prepare them for the credible fear interview (CFI). The Dilley Pro Bono Project will train students to conduct CFI orientations for asylum-seekers and provide guidance on how to prepare them for their interview. This course requires an application process. Please email instructor Vivian Brates vbrates@stanford.edu to get a link to the appropriate web form. Students participating in the weekly meeting during the academic term but not traveling to Texas should enroll for one unit. Students traveling in addition to the academic term meetings should enroll for 3 units. Please note that this course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brates, V. (PI)

INTNLREL 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, EMED 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, HUMRTS 112)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

INTNLREL 142: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice (AFRICAST 142, AFRICAST 242, CSRE 142C)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ITALIC 99: Immersion in the Arts

Student-led courses in the arts. Topics change quarterly. Open to ALL students but current ITALIC students and alumni will be given priority.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ITALIC 100: ITALIC Seminar: Notes to a Young Artist

Working with the Haas Center, students in this seminar will create a mini-magazine/online course about art to share with students at a Bay Area high school. You will assemble a list of suggested readings and brief essays on key artistic texts and concepts, as well as images and links to the artistic examples you find most inspiring. You will create a variety of media about these ideas and artists, from illustrated slideshows to video essays or podcasts to short explanatory texts and longer personal essays. The guiding question of the course is: What does a young artist need to know?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beil, K. (PI); Oeler, K. (PI)

LAW 805Z: Policy Practicum: Supporting INTERPOL's Efforts to Combat Transnational Crime

Changes in the nature of transnational crime and developments under international law may necessitate adjustments of INTERPOL's policy and legal considerations in three broad areas: (1) online manifestations of support for extremist and terrorist conduct; (2) misinformation and fake new; (3) online incitement of violence and hatred, defamation, harassment, and cyber bullying. This Practicum aims to develop principles for INTERPOL to guide its interpretation and application of Article 3 to capture this new--online--manifestation of transnational crime. More specifically, it aims to establish general guidelines that INTERPOL can rely on in determining whether a request to process information on offenses arguably implicating freedom of expression online is in alignment with its constitutional obligation to remain neutral and adhere to international human rights standards. This Practicum is open to graduate students from law (2L, 3L, and Advanced Degree), business, international policy, communications, computer science, and other relevant programs. Highly qualified undergraduates are also invited to apply. The practicum meets 9-10:30 on Wednesdays. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.Cross-listed with International Policy (INTLPOL 255) in Winter and Spring.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 807C: Policy Practicum: Donor Advised Funds and Their Critics

The donor advised fund (DAF) is an increasingly popular vehicle for charitable giving. Donors receive a tax deduction when they contribute money or appreciated assets to a DAF; at their discretion, donors (DAF "holders") may advise the DAF manager, or "sponsor," to distribute funds to tax-exempt charities. There are about 500,000 individual DAFs across the country, with total assets of over $100 billion. The major DAF sponsors are community foundations and the charitable arms of investment managers like Schwab, Fidelity, and Vanguard. Although donors can only "advise" rather than "direct" a sponsor to make a gift, their advice is almost always heeded. DAFs arguably incentivize giving by providing a vehicle for donating complex assets and reducing a donor's burdens by offloading administrative tasks to the DAF sponsor. Some DAF sponsors also offer advice to enable their DAF holders to give more effectively. Yet DAFs have been criticized on several grounds, and legislation has been introduced (but not enacted) to regulate them. One criticism is that while donors receive the tax deduction immediately upon contributing to a DAF, they can take as long as they wish to make gifts from the DAF, and even pass advisory authority on to their heirs, thus delaying putting the funds into the hands of charities that can use them. (In comparison, foundations are required to spend at least 5 percent of their assets annually.) Another criticism is that gifts made through a DAF can be anonymous, with only the DAF sponsor listed as the donor. (In comparison, gifts and grants by foundations must be reported on publicly available tax returns.) In addition, some DAF sponsors have concerns about requests to make gifts to putative hate groups: how to determine whether an organization falls in this category, and how to respond to the request if it does. At a time when the controversy around DAFs is only likely to grow, this Policy Lab practicum will provide an evidence-based analysis of the pros and cons of various self-reform and regulatory proposals. The research team will focus on understanding the perspectives of the recipients of DAF funding as well as those of DAF sponsors, DAF holders, regulators, and critics. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 807E: Policy Practicum: Redesigning the Venezuelan Judiciary: The Venezuelan Constitutional Crisis

Client: National Assembly of Venezuela, Special Committee for the Defense of the Constitution. Venezuela is undergoing a profound political, humanitarian, and economic crisis. Although a dictatorship currently reigns, reformers have begun to plan for a brighter and more democratic future. Students enrolled in this policy lab will have a unique opportunity to help set the terms of a future Venezuelan democracy (and institutional reforms) via a report to be submitted to the Venezuelan National Assembly, the only remaining democratic institution in the country. The report will inform efforts to create a new Venezuelan judiciary. Specifically, students will spearhead completion of a report designed to explore reforms and improvements to judicial independence, judicial appointments, the workings of the judiciary, and the broader legal system. Students will interact with Venezuelan congressional representatives, human rights experts, and research other countries¿ experiences with judicial reform. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 807H: Policy Practicum: Can Opening Up the Legal Services Market Increase Access to Justice?

Several states --- including California, Arizona and Utah --- are considering or already moving forward with changes to the regulations on who can provide legal services --- regulations that are contained in the Rules of Professional Conduct for each state. These proposed reforms are designed to accelerate innovation in the delivery of legal services, and increase access to justice, in part by allowing technology and people without JDs to play a greater role than they can today. As states consider these reforms, there are many questions around the likely impact of these reforms on consumers and providers of legal services, and the most promising regulatory regime(s). Students will research and write about such questions as: (1) What are some of the most promising models from other industries for protecting consumers from harm, and providing redress? (2) What might an independent regulator that oversees entities that provide legal services look like? (3) What are the most promising innovations in states that have experimented with non- lawyer providers and other access to justice initiatives. (4) What lessons can we learn from other contexts, including other countries and other professions (for example the medical context, where nurse practitioners can provide services directly, and people other than physicians can own entities that provide health care)? The client will be one or more of the following non-profits working on these issues: the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System, National Center on State Courts, or Responsive Law. The deliverables will be a set of policy briefs and talking points that will inform the regulatory reform debate. Students from a range of disciplines are very welcome, including undergraduates interested in public policy. We will tentatively meet Tues 4-5, but if that doesn't work for everyone, we can find times to meet during the lunch hour as well. Elements used in grading: Performance, Written Assignments, Final Paper. This practicum continues for two quarters - winter and spring. Only students enrolled in the winter quarter may continue with the project in the spring term. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 807I: Policy Practicum: Tools for Reentry: Practices, Apps, and Services

Client: Various government agencies and nonprofit groups. Formerly incarcerated individuals face a range of personal and institutional challenges in their reentry into broader society. Considerable research and many programs have focused on systems reform and support and social programs to increase the likelihood of successful reentry. But technological tools also have the potential to help lower friction and increase the success of reentry. This policy lab will engage with challenging legal, social, government systems, and technological questions, with opportunities to design and/or implement new tools to aid in the reentry process. We will work with a variety of stakeholders including government organizations and programs, non-profit entities, and legal innovators to prototype and evaluate new technological solutions to facilitate the reentry process and reduce recidivism. This practicum will build a collaborative team of diverse backgrounds and skill sets to learn from each other and enhance the overall capacity of the research and tool development. We encourage students who are interested in criminal justice, technology for social impact, access to justice, and entrepreneurship and innovation for social good to join us, including upper-division and graduate students from Law, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, MS&E, Public Policy, and the social sciences. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final PROJECT. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 807K: Policy Practicum: The Outlaw Ocean

Client: Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions, https://oceansolutions.stanford.edu/. Illegal fishing has long plagued the world's oceans, undermining economic development, national security, food security, and human rights -- and nowhere is this more starkly evident than in the Pacific. From cans of tuna to shrimp cocktail, the legality of how this seafood is caught and processed is often uncertain. A recent World Resources Institute study estimates that half of illegal marine trading networks come from the Pacific, totaling between 3.7 and 7.2 million tons of fish stolen from fishermen and coastal nations. This policy lab confronts the global environmental, human rights and privacy challenges associated with the existing framework of international laws and policies. The research delves into international laws that apply to the high seas, illegal fishing and forced labor and slavery to locate leverage points and explore innovative solutions, including how new technologies might be developed and deployed. The research contributes to a pilot project -- The Friends of Ocean Action - led by World Economic Forum leaders who are exploring the nexus of international laws and policies, together with national implementation and enforcement mechanisms, related to governance of the oceans. Effective governance includes cooperation among nations, international seafood companies, nonprofit organizations, and the containment of rogue actors. The Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions serves as the policy client and will connect students with such partners as UN-sanctioned working groups, large seafood companies, and human rights and environmental NGOs. Students will produce policy briefs that will contribute to a comprehensive public report by the Center for Ocean Solutions. The Practicum will target using forums such as the upcoming UN Ocean Conference and UN Ocean Day as a platform to share student results. The practicum seeks law students and graduate and well-qualified undergraduates in such programs as earth systems, computer science, product design, public policy, sociology, and marine biology. Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 807L: Policy Practicum: The Opioid Epidemic: Developing New Law and Policy Tools

Same as PSYC 107. Client: Broken No More, http://broken-no-more.org/about-us/. More Americans die every year of overdose than died in the entire course of the 1955-75 Vietnam conflict. Overdose has helped reduce aggregate US life expectancy for three years in a row¿something that has not happened in 100 years, including at the height of the AIDS epidemic in the '80s and '90s. Measured by loss-of-life, opiate-related overdose is the most acute national health crisis of our lifetimes. Student researchers will work closely with the client, Broken No More, a national organization of parents and families who have lost family members to opioid use. The organization supports grieving members and also pushes forward evidence-based, public health interventions to the opioid epidemic. This practicum explores legal approaches to a more comprehensive and thoughtful understanding to the Opioid Epidemic. The research team will evaluate whether various stakeholders have fulfilled their legal and regulatory obligations to respond to the epidemic, including whether hospitals and insurers fulfill their implied "duty of care." The questions addressed in this practicum could have life-saving impact on people currently suffering from opioid use disorder. The course seeks to build a diverse research team with students from law, public policy, medicine, public health, and sociology. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 807O: Policy Practicum: Assessing the Impact of China's Global Infrastructure Spending on Climate Change

Client: Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance. China is engaged in massive energy-infrastructure spending around the world. Whether that spending is high-carbon or low-carbon will do much to determine the future of global climate change. One swathe of that spending is known as the Belt and Road Initiative, or BRI. But there's confusion about (1) which Chinese-funded energy-infrastructure projects outside China are part of the BRI and which are not and (2) how Chinese energy-infrastructure spending, both as part of the BRI and beyond it, is affecting the carbon-emissions trajectory in key countries. These are crucial questions as the world crafts policies and financial mechanisms to meaningfully curb carbon emissions. In this policy lab, students will continue research underway at the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance into (1) the opacity of definitions of the BRI and (2) how green or brown Chinese-infrastructure investments are, both in the BRI and outside of it. The work will proceed as case studies of four countries. The initial work has begun to point up two important hypotheses: (1) that, because of the fuzziness of definitions of what constitutes the BRI, analyzing Chinese foreign energy-infrastructure investment writ large is more important than analyzing so-called BRI investment specifically, and (2) that the environmental effect of Chinese energy-infrastructure investments abroad depends more on policies in the host countries than on Chinese policies. These conclusions, illustrated with real-world examples in the four case-study countries, have the potential to reframe Western attitudes toward Chinese energy spending in ways that could promote more international cooperation in battling climate change. The lab seeks two to four graduate students. Law students, business students, engineering and environmental-science students, and students with a focus in East Asia will be eligible. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Ball, J. (PI)

LAWGEN 209Q: Community Police Academy

The Community Police Academy is a combination of classroom instruction and "hands-on" activities that examine life as a police officer. This class looks to clarify and expand the participant's knowledge of the responsibilities, decisions and constraints that face law enforcement officers today, while also providing some perspectives on the national conversation about the role of law enforcement in society. Students can elect to earn two units of credit by completing the readings, short assignments, and attending 4 discussion section meetings, or students may opt to take the course for no credits and only attend the activities. The class is learning opportunity for all involved, an opportunity to build trust and develop partnerships between the Department of Public Safety and the Stanford community. While this course is open to all students throughout the University, the units will not accrue to Law Degree Candidates for credit toward a degree in Law (JD, JSM, JSD, or LLM). Prerequisites: Application and basic background check; minimum 18 years of age.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 105: Designing for Impact

This course will introduce the design thinking process and skills, and explore unique challenges of solving problems and initiating action for public good. Design skills such as need-finding, insight development, and prototyping will be learned through hands-on project work with a community partner and a particular emphasis on the elements required to be effective in the social sector. This is a Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center for Public Service. ME101 recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 170A: Mechanical Engineering Design- Integrating Context with Engineering

First course of two-quarter capstone sequence. Working in project teams, design and develop an engineering system addressing a real-world problem in theme area of pressing societal need. Learn and utilize industry development process: first quarter focuses on establishing requirements and narrowing to top concept. Second quarter emphasizes implementation and testing. Learn and apply professional communication skills, assess ethics. Students must also enroll in ME170b; completion of 170b required to earn grade in 170a. Course sequence fulfills ME WIM requirement. Prerequisites: ENGR15, ME80, ME104 (112), ME131, ME123/151. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 170B: Mechanical Engineering Design: Integrating Context with Engineering

Second course of two-quarter capstone sequence. Working in project teams, design and develop an engineering system addressing a real-world problem in theme area of pressing societal need. Learn and utilize industry development process: first quarter focuses on establishing requirements and narrowing to top concept. Second quarter emphasizes implementation and testing. Learn and apply professional communication skills, assess ethics. Students must have completed ME170a; completion of 170b required to earn grade in 170a. Course sequence fulfills ME WIM requirement. Prerequisites: ENGR15, ME80, ME112, ME131, ME123/151. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 1A: Leadership in Multicultural Health

Designed for undergraduates serving as staff for the Stanford Medical Youth Science Summer Residential Program (SRP). Structured opportunitie to learn, observe, participate in, and evaluate leadership development, multicultural health theories and practices, and social advocacy. Utilizes service learning as a pedagogical approach to developing an understanding of the intersections between identity, power and privilege and disparities (health, education, environment), fostering knowledge and skills to become social advocates to address forms of inequities. Students explore approaches for identifying and tackling issues of equity (health and education) as well as learn fundamental skills necessary to implement activities for the Summer Residential Program.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 51B: Compassionate Presence at the Bedside: The Healer's Art

Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice compassionate and respectful communication strategies, learn how to be a cam, compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of seriously ill patients. We believe that medical school curricula do not have a strong focus on essential doctoring skills related to communication and a compassionate presence at the bedside. By offering this course to pre-med students, we believe that the doctors of the future will become skilled and compassionate healers.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 51Q: Cultivate a Compassionate Presence: An Aging and End-of-Life Care Practicum

This is a Community Engaged Learning Course for undergraduate students. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagement of patients within the context of aging and end of life. The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting. Using a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual-cultural framework, students learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of geriatrics and palliative care. Students will be exposed to the challenges faced by patients from diverse backgrounds and their caregivers.nThe class has a strong practicum aspect by which students will be trained to cultivate a compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of the patient. After completing formal volunteer training, each student will be assigned a small panel of patients. Students will work with an inter-disciplinary team, conduct regular house calls on patients in their panel, and write progress notes, which will become a part of the patients' electronic medical records. Through mentored fieldwork, students will learn the basic competencies of communicating with older adults from diverse backgrounds in a respectful and compassionate manner. Students will be taught to discuss their panel of patients in class every week using the standard medical clinical rounds approach. Weekly assignments will help students reflect on their interactions with the patients and lessons they learned. Our goal is to train future leaders in the fields of healthcare, law, sociology, public policy, and humanities in the vital area of aging and end-of-life care for diverse Americans.nPLEASE NOTE: This IntroSem is a Cardinal Course. Students who enroll in MED 51Q will be working directly with patients. As a prerequisite for patient-care, all students (a) must complete TB testing, HIPAA training, patient safety training, and background check; (b) must be able to perform the physical activities required for patient care which includes the ability to frequently stand, walk, twist, bend, stoop, squat and occasionally lift, carry, push, and pull objects that weigh up to 40 pounds and assist patients into their wheelchairs and take them on walks. All tests required will be provided free of cost and have to be completed with specific agencies affiliated with Stanford. Failure to complete paperwork will result in student being dropped from the class. Professor Periyakoil will send more specific directions after students are enrolled in MED 51Q.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 159: Oaxacan Health on Both Sides of the Border

Required for students participating in the Community Health in Oaxaca summer program. Introduction to the health literacy and health-seeking behaviors of Oaxacan and other Mexican migrants; the health challenges these groups face. Through discussion and reflection, students prepare for clinical work and community engagement in Oaxaca, while also gaining knowledge and insight to make connections between their experiences in Mexico and their health-related work with Mexican immigrants in the Bay Area. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: application and acceptance into the Community Health in Oaxaca Summer Program (http://och.stanford.edu/oaxaca.html).
Terms: Spr, not given this year | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 181: Preparation for Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics

Training course for new undergraduate volunteers at the Cardinal Free Clinics (CFCs). Topics include introduction to methods for providing culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for underserved patient populations, clinic structure and roles, free clinics in the larger context of American healthcare, foundations in community health, cultural humility and implicit bias in healthcare, motivational interviewing and patient advocacy skills, and role-specific preparation. Application only; must be an accepted CFC volunteer. Visit https://cfc.stanford.edu for more information. 1-2 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 232: Global Health: Scaling Health Technology Innovations in Low Resource Settings

Recent advances in health technologies - incorporating innovations like robotics, cloud computing, artificial intelligence, and smart sensors - have raised expectations of a dramatic impact on health outcomes across the world. However, bringing innovative technologies to low resource settings has proven challenging, limiting their impact. This course explores critical questions regarding the implementation and impact of technological innovations in low resource settings. The course will feature thought leaders from the health technology community, who will explore examples of technologies that have been successful in low resource communities, as well as those that have failed. Students will think critically to consider conditions under which technologies reach scale and have positive impact in the global health field. This course is open to undergraduate students, graduate students, and medical students. Undergraduates can take this course for a letter grade and 3 units. Graduate students and MD students can enroll for 2 units. Students enrolling in the course for a third unit will also work on group projects, each of which will focus on the potential opportunity for a health technology in a low resource setting and consider approaches to ensure its impact at scale. Students enrolled in the class for three units will also have additional assignments, including weekly discussion posts. Students must submit an application and be selected to receive an enrollment code. The application form can be found at the following link: https://tinyurl.com/med232. Contact Olivia Paige with any questions: olivia.paige@stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 241: Clinical Skills for Patient Care in Free Clinics

Enrollment in this course is by application only for advanced volunteers at the Cardinal Free Clinics. Focus is on preparing students to gain early clinical experience by teaching basic skills such as taking patient histories, working with interpreters, providing motivational interviewing, and presenting cases to medical students or physicians. Students learn through classroom lectures and practice sessions. Upon successful completion of a competency assessment, students are able to serve in a clinic role in the Cardinal Free Clinics. Prerequisite: Advanced standing as a volunteer at the Cardinal Free Clinics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MS&E 108: Senior Project

Restricted to MS&E majors in their senior year. Students carry out a major project in groups of four, applying techniques and concepts learned in the major. Project work includes problem identification and definition, data collection and synthesis, modeling, development of feasible solutions, and presentation of results. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Satisfies the WIM requirement for MS&E majors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 297: "Hacking for Defense": Solving National Security issues with the Lean Launchpad

In a crisis, national security initiatives move at the speed of a startup yet in peacetime they default to decades-long acquisition and procurement cycles. Startups operate with continual speed and urgency 24/7. Over the last few years they've learned how to be not only fast, but extremely efficient with resources and time using lean startup methodologies. In this class student teams will take actual national security problems and learn how to apply lean startup principles, ("business model canvas," "customer development," and "agile engineering) to discover and validate customer needs and to continually build iterative prototypes to test whether they understood the problem and solution. Teams take a hands-on approach requiring close engagement with actual military, Department of Defense and other government agency end-users. Team applications required in February, see hacking4defense.stanford.edu. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 330: Law, Order, & Algorithms (CS 209, CSRE 230, SOC 279)

Human decision making is increasingly being displaced by predictive algorithms. Judges sentence defendants based on statistical risk scores; regulators take enforcement actions based on predicted violations; advertisers target materials based on demographic attributes; and employers evaluate applicants and employees based on machine-learned models. One concern with the rise of such algorithmic decision making is that it may replicate or exacerbate human bias. This course surveys the legal and ethical principles for assessing the equity of algorithms, describes statistical techniques for designing fair systems, and considers how anti-discrimination law and the design of algorithms may need to evolve to account for machine bias. Concepts will be developed in part through guided in-class coding exercises. Admission is by consent of instructor and is limited to 20 students. To enroll in the class, please complete the course application by March 20, available at: https://5harad.com/mse330/. Grading is based on response papers, class participation, and a final project. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent knowledge of coding.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ORALCOMM 129: Sound Stories

This seminar is designed for students interested in creating audio stories for radio, podcast, and other forms of sonic narrative. Students will examine the craft elements of the audio form, popularized by programs such as This American Life, Radiolab, and Serial including skills for interviewing, scoring, and audio editing, and will then produce their own documentary, memoir, or investigative story. This is a hybrid class, equal parts classic seminar and creative workshop. Students will work in small groups, learning how to develop material, choose an effective structure, blend dramatization and reflection, ground insights in concrete scenes, create a strong narrative arc, and manage elements such as characterization, description, and dialogue in order to create engaging stories with social impact. Recommended for students interested not only in podcasting but also creative nonfiction, documentary, film, and sound art. No prior experience with story craft or media required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Naiman, T. (PI)

ORALCOMM 130: ORALCOMM: Your American Life

This small seminar is designed for students interested in creating audio stories for radio or podcast. You will examine the craft elements of the medium, popularized by programs like This American Life, Radiolab and Serial, and then produce your own documentary, memoir, or investigative story. We will explore the basic principles of strong storytelling, and you will learn how to develop your material, choose an effective structure, blend dramatization and reflection, ground insights in concrete scenes, create a strong narrative arc, and manage elements such as characterization, description, and dialogue. We will also examine craft elements unique to the audio form, and you will learn skills for interviewing, scoring, and audio editing. Students will have the opportunity to work with special guests from some of the best narrative podcasts in America. No prior experience with story craft or media required. Cardinal Course/CEL/HAAS
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPGEN 259: Community Health in Oaxaca

Close observation of clinicians at work in community health settings in Oaxaca and service with local community health organizations. Combination of classroom study and discussion with cultural immersion, language training, clinical shadowing, and community service. Topics include: Mexican healthcare system; cultural, socioeconomic and educational factors impacting health of Mexicans and Mexican immigrants to U.S.; Mexican cultural and health beliefs; Mexican migration as a multi-ethnic process.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PE 98: Coaching Corps

This course is designed to build practical and educational foundations to prepare students to be instructional leaders (coaches) in sports activities. Students will have the opportunity to make a valuable contribution to youth while developing practical coaching skills. The course will explore topics including practice planning and designing curriculum, how to effectively engage youth in sports, youth development through sports, social issues facing urban youth in sports, the plight of sports programs in urban centers, and how to create a college-going culture among youth in low-income communities. Students will coach off campus at local schools/community-based organizations that offer after school sports programs.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PEDS 150: Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (PEDS 250)

How do race/ethnicity and social economic status contribute to health disparities, how are vulnerable populations uniquely at risk for poor health outcomes, and how does where we live and work influence our health status? Explore the processes through which social status and environmental determinants adversely affect health and drive inequalities. Discuss clinical, public health and policy solutions for advancing health equity from the perspective of health professionals working in multiple sectors. Other topics include: gender, age, individual and structural bias; language, education; vulnerable populations (e.g., the homeless, the incarcerated, immigrant populations, children, and uninsured/underinsured); life course; environmental forces (e.g., urban design/planning, traffic, green space, housing, food access, law enforcement, and media); and innovative community-engaged and policy solutions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Bruce, J. (PI)

PEDS 212: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (HUMBIO 122M)

(Undergraduate students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. MD and Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rodriguez, E. (PI)

POLISCI 20Q: Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (EDUC 122Q, HISTORY 52Q)

This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ehrlich, T. (PI)

POLISCI 224X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 236: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236S)

What is the basis of private action for public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in civil society and modern democracy? In the "Philanthropy Lab" component of this course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sievers, B. (PI)

POLISCI 236S: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236)

What is the basis of private action for public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in civil society and modern democracy? In the "Philanthropy Lab" component of this course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sievers, B. (PI)

PSYC 86Q: Psychology of Xenophobia

What is the current U.S. socio-political climate like for Muslims? How is it affecting their mental health? Executive Order 13769, dubbed the "Muslim Ban", suspended the entry of citizens from multiple Muslim-majority countries and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely. The "Muslim Ban" coincided with the highest level of hate crimes against Muslims in America (91% increase in 2017 per CAIR). These levels are comparable to post-9/11 levels of hate crimes. Decades of research on minority communities has documented how stress associated with stigma, intimidation and discrimination is detrimental to physical and mental health. In this seminar we will explore the historical implications of Islamophobia and its modern-day impact on the global refugee crisis. Students will be introduced to the stigma that surrounds mental health in general and minority communities in particular. Special attention will be paid to the development of the nascent field Islamic Psychology and integrating Islamic spirituality into therapy as a means of addressing the under utilization of mental health services in Muslim populations. A combination of stimulating group discussions, talks by guest speakers, and field trips to community partners will provide students with different perspectives and a deeper understanding of these topics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Awaad, R. (PI)

PSYC 144: Islamic Psychology (PSYC 244)

The first psychiatric hospitals in the world were established as early as the 8th century during the Islamic Golden Era. Despite the emergence of a highly sophisticated and interdisciplinary system of understanding the human psyche in early Islamic history, most students of modern psychology are unfamiliar with this rich history. This course will provide a historical and contemporary review of the Islamic intellectual heritage as it pertains to modern behavioral science and how mental illness was historically perceived and treated in the Muslim world. We will begin with a discussion of Islamic epistemology, reconcile issues such as secular vs sacred sources of knowledge and tackle the mind/body dilemma according to Islamic theology. We will then review holistic schemas of health and pathology in the Islamic religious tradition, the nature of the human being, elements of the human psyche, and principles of change leading to positive character reformation. As Stanford is the academic home of Muslim mental health research globally, we will benefit from talks by guest researchers and speakers, partake in field trips to community partners, and utilize group discussions to provide students with a deeper understanding of these topics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Awaad, R. (PI)

PSYC 244: Islamic Psychology (PSYC 144)

The first psychiatric hospitals in the world were established as early as the 8th century during the Islamic Golden Era. Despite the emergence of a highly sophisticated and interdisciplinary system of understanding the human psyche in early Islamic history, most students of modern psychology are unfamiliar with this rich history. This course will provide a historical and contemporary review of the Islamic intellectual heritage as it pertains to modern behavioral science and how mental illness was historically perceived and treated in the Muslim world. We will begin with a discussion of Islamic epistemology, reconcile issues such as secular vs sacred sources of knowledge and tackle the mind/body dilemma according to Islamic theology. We will then review holistic schemas of health and pathology in the Islamic religious tradition, the nature of the human being, elements of the human psyche, and principles of change leading to positive character reformation. As Stanford is the academic home of Muslim mental health research globally, we will benefit from talks by guest researchers and speakers, partake in field trips to community partners, and utilize group discussions to provide students with a deeper understanding of these topics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Awaad, R. (PI)

PSYCH 7N: Learn to Intervene, Wisely

One of the most exciting transformations in the social sciences in recent years is the finding that brief psychological exercises can improve important outcomes for months and years such as raising school achievement and reducing inequality, improving health, and reducing intergroup conflict. These interventions help individuals flourish and help our society live up to its ideals. They address critical psychological questions people have, like ¿Do people like me belong in this school?¿, ¿Can I learn math?¿, ¿Am I bad mom?¿, and ¿Can groups in conflict change?¿. In this seminar, we will learn about ¿psychologically wise¿ interventions; how they work; how they can cause lasting benefits; their intellectual lineage; how they can be used, adapted, and scaled to address contemporary problems; and challenges and mistakes that can arise in doing so. In addition to learning from classic and contemporary research, you will design your very own wise intervention and workshop others¿ efforts. Working with a community partner, you will explore a problem your partner faces, identify a specific psychological process you think contributes to this problem, and design an intervention to address this process to improve outcomes, which your partner could implement and evaluate. You will share your approach in a final report with both your seminar-mates and your community partner. When you have completed this seminar, you will more fully understand the psychological aspect of social problems and how this can be addressed through rigorous research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Walton, G. (PI)

PSYCH 155: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 170: Bridging Policy and Tech Through Design (CS 184)

This project-based course aims to bring together students from computer science and the social sciences to work with external partner organizations at the nexus of digital technology and public policy. Students will collaborate in interdisciplinary teams on a problem with a partner organization. Along with the guidance of faculty mentors and the teaching staff, students will produce a set of deliverables ranging from policy memos and white papers to data visualizations and software. Possible projects suggested by partner organizations will be presented at an information session on Tuesday, March 3rd at 6:30 pm in Gates 415 - RSVP http://bit.ly/InfoCS184. Following the info session, a course application will open for teams to be selected before the start of Spring Quarter. Students may apply to a project with a partner organization or with a pre-formed team and their own idea to be reviewed for approval by the course staff. Applications close March 20 and successful applicants will be notified by Tuesday, March 24th. The course meets twice a week: Once with all students taking the course and a second time with the project-based team mentors. The time below is for the cross-team meetings, as the team meetings will be scheduled according to member availability. Prerequisites: Appropriate preparation depends on the nature of the project proposed, and will be verified by the teaching staff based on your application.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ullman, J. (PI)

PUBLPOL 178: The Science and Practice of Effective Advocacy (CSRE 178P, URBANST 178)

How can purposeful collective action change government policy, business practices and cultural norms? This course will teach students about the components of successful change campaigns and help develop the practical skills to carry out such efforts. The concepts taught will be relevant to both issue advocacy and electoral campaigns, and be evidence-based, drawing on lessons from social psychology, political science, communications, community organizing and social movements. The course will meet twice-a-week for 90 minutes, and class time will combine engaged learning exercises, discussions and lectures. There will be a midterm and final. Students will be able to take the course for 3 or 5 units. Students who take the course for 5 units will participate in an advocacy project with an outside organization during the quarter, attend a related section meeting and write reflections. For 5 unit students, the section meeting is on Tuesdays, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Litvak, L. (PI)

PUBLPOL 200A: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 200B: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ajami, N. (PI)

PUBLPOL 200C: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 265F: Environmental Governance and Climate Resilience (CEE 265F, POLISCI 227B)

Adaptation to climate change will not only require new infrastructure and policies, but it will also challenge our local, state and national governments to collaborate across jurisdictional lines in ways that include many different types of private and nonprofit organizations and individual actors. The course explores what it means for communities to be resilient and how they can reach that goal in an equitable and effective way. Using wildfires in California as a case study, the course assesses specific strategies, such as controlled burns and building codes, and a range of planning and policy measures that can be used to enhance climate resilience. In addition, it considers how climate change and development of forested exurban areas (among other factors) have influenced the size and severity of wildfires. The course also examines the obstacles communities face in selecting and implementing adaptation measures (e.g., resource constraints, incentives to develop in forested areas, inadequate policy enforcement, and weak inter-agency coordination). Officials from various Bay Area organizations contribute to aspects of the course; and students will present final papers to local government offcials. Limited enrollment. Students will be asked to prepare application essays on the first day of class. Course is intended for seniors and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PWR 2EE: Writing & Rhetoric 2: Once Upon a Cause: Producing Picture Books for Local Children

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Whether our favorite picture books as kids were timeless classics or new arrivals, whether they scared us or amused us, consoled us or challenged us, they moved and shaped us in profound ways. How could a few dozen pages and a few hundred words affect us so powerfully? Why did we want to hear and see and read our favorite picture books again and again? What was the secret to their magic? In this course you'll not only analyze that "magic" but will also collaborate closely with a group of classmates to create an original, compelling, and educationally appropriate picture book for second-graders in a local school. For more information about PWR 2, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-2. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ellis, E. (PI)

PWR 2SM: Writing & Rhetoric 2: Dirty Pretty Things: The Rhetoric of Objects and Objectification

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Further work in developing skills in argument and research-based writing, with emphasis on both written and oral/multimedia presentation of research. For more information about PWR 2, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-2. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mediratta, S. (PI)

SOC 146: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 167VP: Justice + Poverty Innovation:Create new solutions for people to navigate housing, medical, & debt

How can emerging technologies and human-centered design be used to help people going through problems with housing, medical care, and debt? In this class, we will work with local partners to develop new tech and design prototypes to address poverty-related problems. We will explore new digital solutions, as well as how to use emerging technologies like AI and blockchain. At the same time, we will explore policy and legal reforms that could address root causes of the problems.nStudents will work in small, interdisciplinary teams with partners organizations in law, medicine, and policy. They will do design research in the field, propose new solutions and test them, and develop new initiatives that will be piloted. The goal is to incubate promising, feasible public interest technology and design projects.nThe class will be run in parallel to similar classes in Mexico, Guatemala, and Colombia. Students will have the chance to learn about similar innovation efforts in other countries, and will be challenged to think about how their own projects could be replicated and scaled
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 279: Law, Order, & Algorithms (CS 209, CSRE 230, MS&E 330)

Human decision making is increasingly being displaced by predictive algorithms. Judges sentence defendants based on statistical risk scores; regulators take enforcement actions based on predicted violations; advertisers target materials based on demographic attributes; and employers evaluate applicants and employees based on machine-learned models. One concern with the rise of such algorithmic decision making is that it may replicate or exacerbate human bias. This course surveys the legal and ethical principles for assessing the equity of algorithms, describes statistical techniques for designing fair systems, and considers how anti-discrimination law and the design of algorithms may need to evolve to account for machine bias. Concepts will be developed in part through guided in-class coding exercises. Admission is by consent of instructor and is limited to 20 students. To enroll in the class, please complete the course application by March 20, available at: https://5harad.com/mse330/. Grading is based on response papers, class participation, and a final project. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent knowledge of coding.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SPANLANG 11SL: Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on Service Learning, First Quarter

Continuation of SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A. Identity and community. Sequence integrating community engaged learning, culture and language with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and academic contexts. SL content focuses on artistic projects with Spanish-speaking youth organizations in the local community. Requires one evening off campus per week in addition to four hours of regular class time. Projects may vary from quarter to quarter (e.g., mural art, print-making, digital storytelling, etc.) but focus on themes surrounding community and youth identity. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Miano, A. (PI)

SPANLANG 12SL: Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on Service Learning, Second Quarter

Continuation of SPANLANG 11. Identity and community. Sequence integrating community engaged learning, culture and language with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and academic contexts. SL content focuses on artistic projects with Spanish-speaking youth organizations in the local community. May require additional hours off campus immediately before and after class, in addition to regular class time. Projects may vary from quarter to quarter (e.g., drama and video production, environmental projects, poetry, etc.) but focus on themes surrounding community and youth identity. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 11C, 11R, 11SL, or 21B.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Del Carpio, C. (PI)

SPANLANG 13SL: Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on Service Learning, Third Quarter

Continuation of SPANLANG 12. Immigration & Citizenship. Sequence integrating community engaged learning, culture and language with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and professional contexts. SL content focuses on immersion in civics-based service learning in the Spanish-speaking local community. Requires one evening off campus per week in addition to three hours of regular class time. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 12C, 12R, 12SL,12M or 12S. Fulfills the IR major
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brates, V. (PI)

SPANLANG 101: The Structure of Spanish

Criteria and skills to analyze Spanish grammatical structure. Identification of word functions in sentences and texts, types of sentences, and terminology. Structure of nouns, adjectives, and verbs, and their relationship with meaning. The differences between Spanish grammar as a formal system and in everyday life.Students who wish to participate in the optional community engaged learning component should sign up for Spanlang 101SL (below). Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C, SPANLANG 13R, SPANLANG 13SL, or SPANLANG 23B.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Miano, A. (PI)

SPANLANG 101SL: The Structure of Spanish (Service Learning Option)

Equivalent to Spanlang 101, integrating service learning with course material. Assignments will be modified for students enrolled under 101SL to focus on principles and practice of community-engaged learning. Students and native Spanish-speaking Stanford workers exchange oral histories and create digital stories with testimonials, advice, or remembrances that workers wish to share. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C, SPANLANG 13R, SPANLANG 13SL, or SPANLANG 23B.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Miano, A. (PI)

SPANLANG 102SL: Composition and Writing Workshop

SPANLANG 102SL. Equivalent to Spanlang 102, integrating service learning with course material. Assignments will be modified for students enrolled under 102SL to focus on principles and practice of community-engaged learning. Students and native Spanish-speaking Stanford workers exchange oral histories and create digital stories with testimonials, advice, or remembrances that workers wish to share. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). In 2016-2017, Spring Quarter only. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C, SPANLANG 13R, SPANLANG 13SL, or SPANLANG 23B
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brates, V. (PI)

SPANLANG 108SL: Advanced Spanish Immersion:Migration, Asylum & Human Rights at the Border

Students develop advanced Spanish language proficiency through examination of issues surrounding current immigration and refugee crises. Discussion of Central American contexts, international treaties, human rights, and U.S. immigration law. Class will include expert commentary from legal and mental health professionals, human rights specialists, migrants, and refugees. Legal, medical, and psychological implications of migration. Taught entirely in Spanish. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Students may enroll in the companion elective HUMRTS 108 to volunteer for one week with the CARA Family Detention Pro Bono Project in Dilley, TX,working directly with Spanish-speaking asylum seekers. Prerequisite: completion of SPANLANG 13, 23B or equivalent. SPANLANG 108SL is a requirement for HUMRTS 108. This course requires an application process. Please email instructor for consent
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brates, V. (PI)

STS 200T: Nuclear Insecurity in the Bay Area and Beyond (HISTORY 203F)

This upper-level course explores the history of radioactive contamination in the Bay Area and elsewhere. We'll examine the legacy of atomic bomb testing in our region and the current political implications of that legacy. We'll then explore the colonial and postcolonial dimensions of the nuclear age and the long-term contamination it has produced. Case studies vary yearly; they include uranium mining in Africa, nuclear testing in the Pacific, and accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima. At least one field trip!
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hecht, G. (PI)

SUST 240: Sustainability Leadership Practicum

The Sustainability Leadership Practicum provides an opportunity for students in the SUST master¿s program to practice, integrate and internalize core lessons from the program curriculum. Students will independently complete a 120-hour Practicum project of their own design, collaborating on a complex sustainability challenge with an outside partner and working through the types of constraints often faced by decision makers and leaders. Through the Practicum experience, students reflect on and exercise the knowledge, mindsets and practical skills developed through their SUST coursework, including the foundational program concepts of complex social-environmental systems, change leadership, and systems innovation and transformation. Ultimately, the Practicum is designed to develop each student's identity and capacity as a transformative leader through practice. While the Practicum can be carried out and the units earned at any time during the master¿s program, students are encouraged to start the planning process early, allowing plenty of time to forge a relationship with a partner organization and develop a thoughtful and feasible proposal (to be approved by program leadership and the student¿s advisor) prior to carrying out their Practicum fieldwork. Deliverables include a reflection paper and a 15-minute final presentation. This course does not convene in a classroom setting. Instead, students are expected to attend Practicum presentation events that will be hosted quarterly. Enrollment is limited to students in the SUST coterm master¿s program. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 165: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, SOC 146)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (AMSTUD 197, DANCE 197)

This class uses the lens of performance, and particularly dance, to explore the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration and its cultural dimensions. Class readings and discussions foreground the legal and social contexts surrounding prisons in the U.S., Particular attention will be paid to the nexus of art, community, and social action, and how dance might be used to study the performing arts effects on self-construction, perception, experiences of embodiment, and social control for incarcerated teenagers. The class includes guest speakers who bring important perspectives on criminal justice including returned citizens, a juvenile justice attorney, a restorative conferencing facilitator and a dancer who teaches women in prison to be their own dance instructors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 125: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (CSRE 125E, EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 126: Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation (CSRE 162A, RELIGST 162X)

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Karlin-Neumann, P. (PI)

URBANST 141: Gentrification (AFRICAAM 241A, CSRE 141)

Neighborhoods in the Bay Area and around the world are undergoing a transformation known as gentrification. Middle- and upper-income people are moving into what were once low-income areas, and housing costs are on the rise. Tensions between newcomers and old timers, who are often separated by race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation, can erupt; high rents may force long-time residents to leave. In this class we will move beyond simplistic media depictions to explore the complex history, nature, causes and consequences of this process. Students will learn through readings, films, class discussions, and engagement with a local community organization. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kahan, M. (PI)

URBANST 164: Sustainable Cities (EARTHSYS 160)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chan, D. (PI)

URBANST 169: Race and Ethnicity in Urban California (AFRICAAM 169A, AMSTUD 169, CSRE 260)

The course is part of an ongoing research project that examines the consequences of longterm social, economic, and political changes in ethnic and race relations in in urban California. The required readings, discussions, and service learning component all provide a platform for students to explore important issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid demographic transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McKibben, C. (PI)

URBANST 178: The Science and Practice of Effective Advocacy (CSRE 178P, PUBLPOL 178)

How can purposeful collective action change government policy, business practices and cultural norms? This course will teach students about the components of successful change campaigns and help develop the practical skills to carry out such efforts. The concepts taught will be relevant to both issue advocacy and electoral campaigns, and be evidence-based, drawing on lessons from social psychology, political science, communications, community organizing and social movements. The course will meet twice-a-week for 90 minutes, and class time will combine engaged learning exercises, discussions and lectures. There will be a midterm and final. Students will be able to take the course for 3 or 5 units. Students who take the course for 5 units will participate in an advocacy project with an outside organization during the quarter, attend a related section meeting and write reflections. For 5 unit students, the section meeting is on Tuesdays, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Litvak, L. (PI)
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