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BIOHOPK 174H: Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 274H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in designing experiments to address biological problems. Focus is on experimental design and the use of linear models in testing hypotheses (e.g., analysis of variance, regression). Students will use R to explore and analyze locally relevant biological datasets. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Elahi, R. (PI)

BIOHOPK 175H: Marine Science and Conservation in a Changing World (BIOHOPK 275H)

Graduate students register for 275H. This hands-on, experiential course provides a broad foundation in marine science, and explores emerging opportunities for innovation in the study of life in the sea. Students are resident at Stanfords Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove (90 miles south of main campus) where the diverse organisms and environments of Monterey Bay provide the focus for the course. Class meets daily with lectures, discussions, labs, and field work throughout the day. Three linked concentrations¿each 3 weeks long¿are taught sequentially to address (1) the extraordinary diversity of marine organisms and habitats, (2) the physiology and behavior of marine animals, and (3) the principles of marine ecology. Connecting these concentrations is a weekly seminar-based discussion of topics in marine conservation. This design permits deep concentration on each subject, and places emphasis on discussion, group dialog, individual exploration, and experiential learning. In the final week of the quarter, students complete an individual capstone project of their choosing. For the Biology major, this course fulfills the same requirements as BIO 47 and BIO 81. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 198H: Directed Instruction or Reading

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 199H: Undergraduate Research

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 234H: Topics in Comparative and Environmental Physiology

Seminar and discussion focused on current topics and research at the interface of physiology and ecology
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goldbogen, J. (PI)

BIOHOPK 274H: Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 174H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in designing experiments to address biological problems. Focus is on experimental design and the use of linear models in testing hypotheses (e.g., analysis of variance, regression). Students will use R to explore and analyze locally relevant biological datasets. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Elahi, R. (PI)

BIOHOPK 275H: Marine Science and Conservation in a Changing World (BIOHOPK 175H)

Graduate students register for 275H. This hands-on, experiential course provides a broad foundation in marine science, and explores emerging opportunities for innovation in the study of life in the sea. Students are resident at Stanfords Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove (90 miles south of main campus) where the diverse organisms and environments of Monterey Bay provide the focus for the course. Class meets daily with lectures, discussions, labs, and field work throughout the day. Three linked concentrations¿each 3 weeks long¿are taught sequentially to address (1) the extraordinary diversity of marine organisms and habitats, (2) the physiology and behavior of marine animals, and (3) the principles of marine ecology. Connecting these concentrations is a weekly seminar-based discussion of topics in marine conservation. This design permits deep concentration on each subject, and places emphasis on discussion, group dialog, individual exploration, and experiential learning. In the final week of the quarter, students complete an individual capstone project of their choosing. For the Biology major, this course fulfills the same requirements as BIO 47 and BIO 81. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 290H: Teaching Practicum in Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical supervised teaching experience in a biology or lecture course. Training often includes attending lectures, initiating and planning discussion sections, and assisting in the preparation of course materials. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 300H: Research

Graduate study involving original work undertaken with staff in the fields indicated. B. Block: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (biomechanics, metabolic physiology and phylogeny of pelagic fishes, evolution of endothermy); L. Crowder: Marine ecology, fisheries, bycatch, integrating science and policy, marine conservation; G. De Leo: Population dynamics and management, wildlife diseases, environmental policies and sustainable development; M. Denny: Biomechanics (the mechanical properties of biological materials and their consequences for animal size, shape, and performance); W. Gilly: Neurobiology (analysis of giant axon systems in marine invertebrates from molecular to behavioral levels); J. Goldbogen: Physiological and Behavioral Ecology (functional morphology and biomechanics of marine organisms): C. Lowe: Evolution of Development (origin of chordates, early evolution of body plans); F. Micheli: Marine Ecology (species interactions and community ecology, scale-dependent aspects of community organization, marine conservation and design of multi-species marine protected areas, behavioral ecology); S. Palumbi: Molecular Evolution (mechanisms of speciation, genetic differentiations of populations, use of molecular tools in conservation biology, design of marine protected areas); S. Thompson: Neurobiology (neuronal control of behavior and mechanisms of ion permeation, signal transduction, calcium homeostasis, and neutrotransmission); J. Watanabe: Marine Ecology (kelp forest ecology and invertebrate zoology).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 330H: Scientific Writing

This writer's seminar will workshop the elements of good scientific writing by focusing on a paper's Introduction. We will chart the elements of an effective Introduction, designed for different audiences and types of scientific journals. The course will provide participants with the chance to craft an Introduction to a current paper or proposal and have it evaluated in light of the ideal structure we define.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Palumbi, S. (PI)

BIOHOPK 801H: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

BIOHOPK 802H: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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