Print Settings
 

BIOE 32Q: Bon App├ętit, Marie Curie! The Science Behind Haute Cuisine

This seminar is for anyone who loves food, cooking or science! We will focus on the science and biology behind the techniques and the taste buds. Not a single lecture will pass by without a delicious opportunity - each weekly meeting will include not only lecture, but also a lab demonstration and a chance to prepare classic dishes that illustrate that day's scientific concepts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Covert, M. (PI)

BIOE 42: Physical Biology

BIOE 42 is designed to introduce students to general engineering principles that have emerged from theory and experiments in biology. Topics covered will cover the scales from molecules to cells to organisms, including fundamental principles of entropy, diffusion, and continuum mechanics. These topics will link to several biological questions, including DNA organization, ligand binding, cytoskeletal mechanics, and the electromagnetic origin of nerve impulses. In all cases, students will learn to develop toy models that can explain quantitative measurements of the function of biological systems. Prerequisites: MATH 19, 20, 21 CHEM 31A, B (or 31X), PHYSICS 41; strongly recommended: CS 106A, CME 100 or MATH 51, and CME 106; or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 44: Fundamentals for Engineering Biology Lab

Introduction to next-generation techniques in genetic, molecular, biochemical, and cellular engineering. Lab modules build upon current research including: gene and genome engineering via decoupled design and construction of genetic material; component engineering focusing on molecular design and quantitative analysis of experiments; device and system engineering using abstracted genetically encoded objects; and product development based on useful applications of biological technologies. Concurrent or previous enrollment in BIO 82 or BIO 83.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 51: Anatomy for Bioengineers

Fundamental human anatomy, spanning major body systems and tissues including nerve, muscle, bone, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and renal systems. Explore intricacies of structure and function, and how various body parts come together to form a coherent and adaptable living being. Correlate clinical conditions and therapeutic interventions. Participate in lab sessions with predissected cadaveric material and hands-on learning to gain understanding of the bioengineering human application domain. Encourage anatomical thinking, defining challenges and opportunities for bioengineers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 70Q: Medical Device Innovation

BIOE 70Q invites students to apply design thinking to the creation of healthcare technologies. Students will learn about the variety of factors that shape healthcare innovation, and through hands-on design projects, invent their own solutions to clinical needs. Guest instructors will include engineers, doctors, entrepreneurs, and others who have helped bring ideas from concept to clinical use.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 80: Introduction to Bioengineering (Engineering Living Matter) (ENGR 80)

Students completing BIOE.80 should have a working understanding for how to approach the systematic engineering of living systems to benefit all people and the planet. Our main goals are (1) to help students learn ways of thinking about engineering living matter and (2) to empower students to explore the broader ramifications of engineering life. Specific concepts and skills covered include but are not limited to: capacities of natural life on Earth; scope of the existing human-directed bioeconomy; deconstructing complicated problems; reaction & diffusion systems; microbial human anatomy; conceptualizing the engineering of biology; how atoms can be organized to make molecules; how to print DNA from scratch; programming genetic sensors, logic, & actuators; biology beyond molecules (photons, electrons, etc.); what constraints limit what life can do?; what will be the major health challenges in 2030?; how does what we want shape bioengineering?; who should choose and realize various competing bioengineering futures?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 103: Systems Physiology and Design

Physiology of intact human tissues, organs, and organ systems in health and disease, and bioengineering tools used (or needed) to probe and model these physiological systems. Topics: Clinical physiology, network physiology and system design/plasticity, diseases and interventions (major syndromes, simulation, and treatment, instrumentation for intervention, stimulation, diagnosis, and prevention), and new technologies including tissue engineering and optogenetics.  Discussions of pathology of these systems in a clinical-case based format, with a view towards identifying unmet clinical needs.  Learning computational skills that not only enable simulation of these systems but also apply more broadly to biomedical data analysis. Prerequisites: CME 102; PHYSICS 41; BIO 82, BIO 84.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 103B: Systems Physiology and Design

*ONLINE Offering of BIOE 103. This pilot class, BIOE103B, is an entirely online offering with the same content, learning goals, and prerequisites as BIOE 103. Students attend class by watching videos and completing assignments remotely. Students may attend recitation and office hours in person, but cannot attend the BIOE103 in-person lecture due to room capacity restraints.* Physiology of intact human tissues, organs, and organ systems in health and disease, and bioengineering tools used (or needed) to probe and model these physiological systems. Topics: Clinical physiology, network physiology and system design/plasticity, diseases and interventions (major syndromes, simulation, and treatment, instrumentation for intervention, stimulation, diagnosis, and prevention), and new technologies including tissue engineering and optogenetics. Discussions of pathology of these systems in a clinical-case based format, with a view towards identifying unmet clinical needs. Learning computational skills that not only enable simulation of these systems but also apply more broadly to biomedical data analysis. Prerequisites: CME 102; PHYSICS 41; BIO 82, BIO 84. strongly recommended PHYSICS 43. Enrollment with Instructor approval
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 131: Ethics in Bioengineering (ETHICSOC 131X)

Bioengineering focuses on the development and application of new technologies in the biology and medicine. These technologies often have powerful effects on living systems at the microscopic and macroscopic level. They can provide great benefit to society, but they also can be used in dangerous or damaging ways. These effects may be positive or negative, and so it is critical that bioengineers understand the basic principles of ethics when thinking about how the technologies they develop can and should be applied. On a personal level, every bioengineer should understand the basic principles of ethical behavior in the professional setting. This course will involve substantial writing, and will use case-study methodology to introduce both societal and personal ethical principles, with a focus on practical applications.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 191X: Out-of-Department Advanced Research Laboratory in Bioengineering

Individual research by arrangement with out-of-department instructors. Credit for 191X is restricted to declared Bioengineering majors pursuing honors and requires department approval. See http://bioengineering.stanford.edu/education/undergraduate.html for additional information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 193: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Human Health Research (BIO 193, CHEM 193, CHEMENG 193)

For undergraduate students participating in the Stanford ChEM-H Undergraduate Scholars Program. This course will expose students to interdisciplinary research questions and approaches that span chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Focus is on the development and practice of scientific reading, writing, and presentation skills intended to complement hands-on laboratory research. Students will read scientific articles, write research proposals, make posters, and give presentations.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alfieri, K. (PI)

BIOE 201C: Diagnostic Devices Lab (BIOE 301C)

This course exposes students to the engineering principles and clinical application of medical devices through lectures and hands-on labs, performed in teams of two. Teams take measurements with these devices and fit their data to theory presented in the lecture. Devices covered include X-ray, CT, MRI, EEG, ECG, Ultrasound and BMI (Brain-machine interface). Prerequisites: BIOE 103 or BIOE 300B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI); Zou, X. (TA)

BIOE 212: Introduction to Biomedical Informatics Research Methodology (BIOMEDIN 212, CS 272, GENE 212)

Capstone Biomedical Informatics (BMI) experience. Hands-on software building. Student teams conceive, design, specify, implement, evaluate, and report on a software project in the domain of biomedicine. Creating written proposals, peer review, providing status reports, and preparing final reports. Issues related to research reproducibility. Guest lectures from professional biomedical informatics systems builders on issues related to the process of project management. Software engineering basics. Because the team projects start in the first week of class, attendance that week is strongly recommended. Prerequisites: BIOMEDIN 210 or 214 or 215 or 217 or 260. Preference to BMI graduate students. Consent of instructor required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 241: Biological Macromolecules (BIOC 241, BIOPHYS 241, SBIO 241)

The physical and chemical basis of macromolecular function. Topics include: forces that stabilize macromolecular structure and their complexes; thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of macromolecular folding, binding, and allostery; diffusional processes; kinetics of enzymatic processes; the relationship of these principles to practical application in experimental design and interpretation. The class emphasizes interactive learning, and is divided among lectures, in-class group problem solving, and discussion of current and classical literature. Enrollment limited to 30. Prerequisites: Background in biochemistry and physical chemistry recommended but material available for those with deficiency in these areas; undergraduates with consent of instructor only.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Das, R. (PI); Ferrell, J. (PI)

BIOE 244: Advanced Frameworks and Approaches for Engineering Integrated Genetic Systems

Concepts and techniques for the design and implementation of engineered genetic systems. Topics covered include the quantitative exploration of tools that support (a) molecular component engineering, (b) abstraction and composition of functional genetic devices, (c) use of control and dynamical systems theory in device and systems design, (d) treatment of molecular "noise", (e) integration of DNA-encoded programs within cellular chassis, (f) designing for evolution, and (g) the use of standards in measurement, genetic layout architecture, and data exchange. Prerequisites: CME104, CME106, CHEM 33, BIO41, BIO42, BIOE41, BIOE42, and BIOE44 (or equivalents), or permission of the instructors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 256: Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices (MS&E 256)

Regulatory approval and reimbursement for new health technologies are critical success factors for product commercialization. This course explores the regulatory and payer environment in the U.S. and abroad, as well as common methods of health technology assessment. Students will learn frameworks to identify factors relevant to the adoption of new health technologies, and the management of those factors in the design and development phases of bringing a product to market through case studies, guest speakers from government (FDA) and industry, and a course project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pietzsch, J. (PI)

BIOE 260: Tissue Engineering (ORTHO 260)

Principles of tissue engineering and design strategies for practical applications for tissue repair. Topics include tissue morphogenesis, stem cells, biomaterials, controlled drug and gene delivery, and paper discussions. Students will learn skills for lab research through interactive lectures, paper discussions and research proposal development. Students work in small teams to work on develop research proposal for authentic tissue engineering problems. Lab sessions will teach techniques for culturing cells in 3D, as well as fabricating and characterizing hydrogels as 3D cell niche.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yang, F. (PI)

BIOE 301C: Diagnostic Devices Lab (BIOE 201C)

This course exposes students to the engineering principles and clinical application of medical devices through lectures and hands-on labs, performed in teams of two. Teams take measurements with these devices and fit their data to theory presented in the lecture. Devices covered include X-ray, CT, MRI, EEG, ECG, Ultrasound and BMI (Brain-machine interface). Prerequisites: BIOE 103 or BIOE 300B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI); Zou, X. (TA)

BIOE 313: Neuromorphics: Brains in Silicon (EE 207)

(Formerly EE 304) Neuromorphic systems run perceptual, cognitive and motor tasks in real-time on a network of highly interconnected nonlinear units. To maximize density and minimize energy, these units--like the brain's neurons--are heterogeneous and stochastic. The first half of the course covers learning algorithms that automatically synthesize network configurations to perform a desired computation on a given heterogeneous neural substrate. The second half of the course surveys system-on-a-chip architectures that efficiently realize highly interconnected networks and mixed analog-digital circuit designs that implement area and energy-efficient nonlinear units. Prerequisites: EE102A is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 326B: In Vivo MR: Relaxation Theory and Contrast Mechanisms (RAD 226B)

Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation theory as applicable to in vivo processes with an emphasis on medical imaging. Topics: physics and mathematics of relaxation, relaxation times in normal and diseased tissues, magnetization transfer contrast, chemical exchange saturation transfer, MRI contrast agents, and hyperpolarized 13C. Prerequisites: BIOE 22A
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 355: Advanced Biochemical Engineering (CHEMENG 355)

Combines biological knowledge and methods with quantitative engineering principles. Quantitative review of biochemistry and metabolism; recombinant DNA technology and synthetic biology (metabolic engineering). The production of protein pharaceuticals as a paradigm for the application of chemical engineering principles to advanced process development within the framework of current business and regulatory requirements. Prerequisite: CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188) or BIOSCI 41, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Swartz, J. (PI)

BIOE 361: Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine (MATSCI 381)

Materials design and engineering for regenerative medicine. How materials interact with cells through their micro- and nanostructure, mechanical properties, degradation characteristics, surface chemistry, and biochemistry. Examples include novel materials for drug and gene delivery, materials for stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry, and cell/molecular biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 374B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (ME 368B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 391: Directed Study

May be used to prepare for research during a later quarter in 392. Faculty sponsor required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOE 392: Directed Investigation

For Bioengineering graduate students. Previous work in 391 may be required for background; faculty sponsor required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Airan, R. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Altman, R. (PI); Andriacchi, T. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Appel, E. (PI); Baker, J. (PI); Bammer, R. (PI); Bao, Z. (PI); Barron, A. (PI); Batzoglou, S. (PI); Bertozzi, C. (PI); Bintu, L. (PI); Boahen, K. (PI); Bowden, A. (PI); Bryant, Z. (PI); Butte, A. (PI); Camarillo, D. (PI); Carter, D. (PI); Chang, H. (PI); Chaudhuri, O. (PI); Chen, X. (PI); Cheng, C. (PI); Chichilnisky, E. (PI); Chiu, W. (PI); Cochran, J. (PI); Contag, C. (PI); Covert, M. (PI); Criddle, C. (PI); Curtis, C. (PI); Dabiri, J. (PI); Dahl, J. (PI); Das, R. (PI); De Leo, G. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Delp, S. (PI); Demirci, U. (PI); Dionne, J. (PI); Elias, J. (PI); Endy, D. (PI); Engleman, E. (PI); Ennis, D. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Fahrig, R. (PI); Feinstein, J. (PI); Feng, L. (PI); Fire, A. (PI); Fischbach, M. (PI); Fordyce, P. (PI); Gambhir, S. (PI); Ganguli, S. (PI); Garcia, C. (PI); Giaccia, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Glover, G. (PI); Gold, G. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Graves, E. (PI); Greenleaf, W. (PI); Hargreaves, B. (PI); Heilshorn, S. (PI); Heller, S. (PI); Herschlag, D. (PI); Huang, K. (PI); Huang, P. (PI); Idoyaga, J. (PI); Ingelsson, E. (PI); Jarosz, D. (PI); Jonikas, M. (PI); Khuri-Yakub, B. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kovacs, G. (PI); Krasnow, M. (PI); Krummel, T. (PI); Kuhl, E. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Leskovec, J. (PI); Levenston, M. (PI); Levin, C. (PI); Lin, M. (PI); Liphardt, J. (PI); Longaker, M. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Marsden, A. (PI); Monje-Deisseroth, M. (PI); Montgomery, S. (PI); Moore, T. (PI); Nishimura, D. (PI); Nolan, G. (PI); Nuyujukian, P. (PI); O'Brien, L. (PI); Okamura, A. (PI); Pauly, J. (PI); Pauly, K. (PI); Pelc, N. (PI); Petrov, D. (PI); Plevritis, S. (PI); Prakash, M. (PI); Pruitt, B. (PI); Qi, S. (PI); Quake, S. (PI); Rando, T. (PI); Raymond, J. (PI); Red-Horse, K. (PI); Reddy, S. (PI); Reijo Pera, R. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Riedel-Kruse, I. (PI); Rose, J. (PI); Rutt, B. (PI); Saggar, M. (PI); Sanger, T. (PI); Santa Maria, P. (PI); Sapolsky, R. (PI); Sattely, E. (PI); Schnitzer, M. (PI); Scott, M. (PI); Shenoy, K. (PI); Smolke, C. (PI); Soh, H. (PI); Soltesz, I. (PI); Sonnenburg, J. (PI); Spielman, D. (PI); Sunwoo, J. (PI); Swartz, J. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Theriot, J. (PI); Wall, D. (PI); Wang, B. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Wang, S. (PI); Weissman, I. (PI); Wernig, M. (PI); Woo, J. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Wyss-Coray, T. (PI); Xing, L. (PI); Yang, F. (PI); Yang, Y. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zeineh, M. (PI); Zenios, S. (PI)

BIOE 393: Bioengineering Departmental Research Colloquium

Required Bioengineering department colloquium for first year Ph.D. and M.S. students. Topics include applications of engineering to biology, medicine, biotechnology, and medical technology, including biodesign and devices, molecular and cellular engineering, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, biomedical imaging, and biomedical computation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Endy, D. (PI)

BIOE 450: Advances in Biotechnology (CHEMENG 450)

Overview of cutting edge advances in biotechnology with a focus on therapeutic and health-related topics. Academic and industrial speakers from a range of areas including protein engineering, immuno-oncology, DNA sequencing, the microbiome, phamacogenomics, industrial enzymes, synthetic biology, and more. Course is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in the biotech industry
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOE 485: Modeling and Simulation of Human Movement (ME 485)

Direct experience with the computational tools used to create simulations of human movement. Lecture/labs on animation of movement; kinematic models of joints; forward dynamic simulation; computational models of muscles, tendons, and ligaments; creation of models from medical images; control of dynamic simulations; collision detection and contact models. Prerequisite: 281, 331A,B, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 500: Thesis (Ph.D.)

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alizadeh, A. (PI); Altman, R. (PI); Andriacchi, T. (PI); Appel, E. (PI); Baker, J. (PI); Bammer, R. (PI); Bao, Z. (PI); Barron, A. (PI); Batzoglou, S. (PI); Bertozzi, C. (PI); Bintu, L. (PI); Boahen, K. (PI); Bryant, Z. (PI); Butte, A. (PI); Camarillo, D. (PI); Carter, D. (PI); Chang, H. (PI); Chaudhuri, O. (PI); Cheng, C. (PI); Chichilnisky, E. (PI); Cochran, J. (PI); Contag, C. (PI); Covert, M. (PI); Dabiri, J. (PI); Dahl, J. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Delp, S. (PI); Demirci, U. (PI); Elias, J. (PI); Endy, D. (PI); Engleman, E. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Fahrig, R. (PI); Feinstein, J. (PI); Feng, L. (PI); Fire, A. (PI); Fischbach, M. (PI); Fordyce, P. (PI); Gambhir, S. (PI); Ganguli, S. (PI); Garcia, C. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Glover, G. (PI); Gold, G. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Graves, E. (PI); Greenleaf, W. (PI); Hargreaves, B. (PI); Heilshorn, S. (PI); Huang, K. (PI); Huang, P. (PI); Khuri-Yakub, B. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kovacs, G. (PI); Krummel, T. (PI); Kuhl, E. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Levenston, M. (PI); Levin, C. (PI); Lin, M. (PI); Liphardt, J. (PI); Longaker, M. (PI); Montgomery, S. (PI); Moore, T. (PI); Nishimura, D. (PI); Nuyujukian, P. (PI); Okamura, A. (PI); Pauly, J. (PI); Pauly, K. (PI); Pelc, N. (PI); Plevritis, S. (PI); Prakash, M. (PI); Pruitt, B. (PI); Qi, S. (PI); Quake, S. (PI); Rando, T. (PI); Raymond, J. (PI); Reijo Pera, R. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Riedel-Kruse, I. (PI); Rose, J. (PI); Sanger, T. (PI); Sapolsky, R. (PI); Sattely, E. (PI); Schnitzer, M. (PI); Scott, M. (PI); Shenoy, K. (PI); Smolke, C. (PI); Soh, H. (PI); Spielman, D. (PI); Swartz, J. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Theriot, J. (PI); Wang, B. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Weissman, I. (PI); Wernig, M. (PI); Woo, J. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Xing, L. (PI); Yang, F. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zenios, S. (PI)

BIOE 802: TGR Dissertation

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
Instructors: ; Airan, R. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Altman, R. (PI); Andriacchi, T. (PI); Appel, E. (PI); Baker, J. (PI); Bammer, R. (PI); Bao, Z. (PI); Barron, A. (PI); Batzoglou, S. (PI); Bertozzi, C. (PI); Bintu, L. (PI); Boahen, K. (PI); Bowden, A. (PI); Bryant, Z. (PI); Butte, A. (PI); Camarillo, D. (PI); Carter, D. (PI); Chang, H. (PI); Chaudhuri, O. (PI); Cheng, C. (PI); Chichilnisky, E. (PI); Chiu, W. (PI); Cochran, J. (PI); Contag, C. (PI); Covert, M. (PI); Curtis, C. (PI); Dabiri, J. (PI); Dahl, J. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Delp, S. (PI); Demirci, U. (PI); Elias, J. (PI); Endy, D. (PI); Engleman, E. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Fahrig, R. (PI); Feinstein, J. (PI); Feng, L. (PI); Fire, A. (PI); Fischbach, M. (PI); Fordyce, P. (PI); Gambhir, S. (PI); Ganguli, S. (PI); Garcia, C. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Glover, G. (PI); Gold, G. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Graves, E. (PI); Greenleaf, W. (PI); Hargreaves, B. (PI); Heilshorn, S. (PI); Huang, K. (PI); Huang, P. (PI); Ingelsson, E. (PI); Jarosz, D. (PI); Khuri-Yakub, B. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kovacs, G. (PI); Krummel, T. (PI); Kuhl, E. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Leskovec, J. (PI); Levenston, M. (PI); Levin, C. (PI); Lin, M. (PI); Liphardt, J. (PI); Longaker, M. (PI); Marsden, A. (PI); Montgomery, S. (PI); Moore, T. (PI); Nishimura, D. (PI); Nolan, G. (PI); Nuyujukian, P. (PI); Okamura, A. (PI); Pauly, J. (PI); Pauly, K. (PI); Pelc, N. (PI); Plevritis, S. (PI); Prakash, M. (PI); Pruitt, B. (PI); Qi, S. (PI); Quake, S. (PI); Rando, T. (PI); Raymond, J. (PI); Reijo Pera, R. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Riedel-Kruse, I. (PI); Rose, J. (PI); Sanger, T. (PI); Sapolsky, R. (PI); Sattely, E. (PI); Schnitzer, M. (PI); Scott, M. (PI); Shenoy, K. (PI); Smolke, C. (PI); Soh, H. (PI); Soltesz, I. (PI); Sonnenburg, J. (PI); Spielman, D. (PI); Sunwoo, J. (PI); Swartz, J. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Theriot, J. (PI); Wall, D. (PI); Wang, B. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Wang, S. (PI); Weissman, I. (PI); Wernig, M. (PI); Woo, J. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wyss-Coray, T. (PI); Xing, L. (PI); Yang, F. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zarins, C. (PI); Zeineh, M. (PI); Zenios, S. (PI)
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints