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BIO 7N: Introduction to Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McConnell, S. (PI)

BIO 30: Ecology for Everyone

Everything is connected, but how? Ecology is the science of interactions and the changes they generate. This project-based course links individual behavior, population growth, species interactions, and ecosystem function. Introduction to measurement, observation, experimental design and hypothesis testing in field projects, mostly done in groups. The goal is to learn to think analytically about everyday ecological processes involving bacteria, fungi, plants, animals and humans. The course uses basic statistics to analyze data; there are no math prerequisites except arithmetic. Open to everyone, including those who may be headed for more advanced courses in ecology and environmental science.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gordon, D. (PI)

BIO 45: Introduction to Laboratory Research in Cell and Molecular Biology

Investigate yeast strains that are engineered to express the human tumor suppressor protein, p53, and use modern molecular methods to identify the functional consequences of p53 mutations isolated from tumor cells. Learn about the protein's role as Guardian of the Genome through lectures and by reading and discussing journal articles. Use molecular visualization programs to examine the structure of normal and mutant p53 proteins. Assay the ability of mutant p53 to direct expression of several reporter genes. During guided reflection, investigate further and identify what could be wrong with the p53 mutants you have been studying. Conduct lab experiments to test hypotheses, analyze data, and present your findings through a team oral presentation, as well as a scientific poster. Although there are no pre-requisites to enroll in this class, having taken CHEM 31X, or 31A and B, and 33 and being concurrently enrolled or past enrollment in appropriate Biology Foundation classes or HumBio core classes is recommended. Note: This class has a $25 course fee.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 46: Introduction to Research in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of how to conduct biological research, using a topic in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Plant Biology as a practical example. This includes the complete scientific process: assessing background literature, generating testable hypotheses, learning techniques for field- and lab-based data collection, analyzing data using appropriate statistical methods, and writing and sharing results. To build these skills, this course focuses on the microorganisms associated with lichen epiphytes. Students, working in teams, develop novel research hypotheses and execute the necessary experiments and measurements to test these hypotheses. In addition, students will learn how to manipulate, visualize and analyze data in R. The capstone of the course is an oral defense of students' findings, as well as a research paper in the style of a peer-reviewed journal article. Labs are completed both on campus and at Jasper Ridge. Lab fee. Information about this class is available at http://bio44.stanford.edu. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fukami, T. (PI)

BIO 60: Problem solving in infectious disease

Why is Lyme disease spreading? How does HIV become drug resistant? How do other animals affect our disease risk? In BIO 60 students will examine actual case studies to experience how different scientific approaches are used to battle infectious disease. They will evaluate information presented in the popular media and the scientific literature, and will directly participate in the scientific process through hands-on collection, documentation and analyses of authentic scientific data. Students will cultivate their scientific curiosity by discovering the natural world with a Foldscope, the `origami paper microscope¿ (https://microcosmos.foldscope.com). Students will build critical thinking skills by creating hypotheses, and designing experiments that pertain to problems in infectious disease. Students will work in teams to expand their thinking and will practice communicating science to different audiences.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 83: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Introduction to the molecular and biochemical basis of life. Lecture topics include the structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates, energy metabolism, signal transduction, epigenetics and DNA repair. The course will also consider how defects in these processes cause disease. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 84: Physiology

The fundamental concepts and systems of animal and plant physiology are the subject matter of this course. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 85: Evolution

Principles of evolution. Adaptation and natural selection. Darwin and the history of evolutionary thought. Population genetics, including genetic variation and mutation, and effects of migration, drift, linkage, and recombination. Evolutionary phenomena: developmental evolution, life history evolution, molecular evolution, sexual selection, social evolution, and speciation. Pattern and process in biological diversity. Case studies, including human evolution. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 104: Advance Molecular Biology: Epigenetics and Proteostasis (BIO 200)

Molecular mechanisms that govern the replication, recombination, and expression of eukaryotic genomes. Topics: DNA replication, DNA recombination, gene transcription, RNA splicing, regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and protein folding. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1. Prerequisite: Biology core or BIO 83 (BIO 82 and 86 are strongly recommended).
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 105A: Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (EARTHSYS 105A)

Formerly 96A - Jasper Ridge Docent Training. First of two-quarter sequence training program to join the Jasper Ridge education/docent program. The scientific basis of ecological research in the context of a field station, hands-on field research, field ecology and the natural history of plants and animals, species interactions, archaeology, geology, hydrology, land management, multidisciplinary environmental education; and research projects, as well as management challenges of the preserve presented by faculty, local experts, and staff. Participants lead research-focused educational tours, assist with classes and research, and attend continuing education classes available to members of the JRBP community after the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 109A: The Human Genome and Disease (BIOC 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

The variability of the human genome and the role of genomic information in research, drug discovery, and human health. Concepts and interpretations of genomic markers in medical research and real life applications. Human genomes in diverse populations. Original contributions from thought leaders in academia and industry and interaction between students and guest lecturers. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 112: Human Physiology (HUMBIO 133)

Human physiology will be examined by organ systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine. Molecular and cell biology and signaling principles that underlie organ development, pathophysiology and opportunities for regenerative medicine are discussed, as well as integrative control mechanisms and fetal development. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kao, P. (PI)

BIO 113: Fundamentals of Molecular Evolution (BIO 244)

The inference of key molecular evolutionary processes from DNA and protein sequences. Topics include random genetic drift, coalescent models, effects and tests of natural selection, combined effects of linkage and natural selection, codon bias and genome evolution. Satisfies Central Menu Areas 1 or 4. Prerequisites: Biology core or BIO 82, 85 or graduate standing in any department, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Petrov, D. (PI)

BIO 115: The Hidden Kingdom - Evolution, Ecology and Diversity of Fungi (BIO 239)

Fungi are critical, yet often hidden, components of the biosphere. They regulate decomposition, are primary partners in plant symbiosis and strongly impact agriculture and economics. Students will explore the fascinating world of fungal biology, ecology and evolution via lecture, lab, field exercises and Saturday field trips that will provide traditional and molecular experiences in the collection, analysis and industrial use of diverse fungi. Students will chose an environmental niche, collect and identify resident fungi, and hypothesize about their community relationship. Prerequisite: Bio 43 or BIO 81, 85 recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Peay, K. (PI)

BIO 117: Biology and Global Change (EARTHSYS 111, ESS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or BIO 81 or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 124: Topics in Cancer Biology

This discussion-based course will explore the scientific tools used to study the molecular and genetic basis of cancer and to develop treatments for this disease. Topics covered may include cancer models, traditional and targeted cancer therapies, and the development of resistance to treatment. Students will develop skills in critical reading of primary research articles and will also complete a final project. Prerequisites: Biology/Human Biology core or BIO 82, 83, 86, or of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Imam, J. (PI)

BIO 126: Introduction to Biophysics (APPPHYS 205, BIO 226)

Core course appropriate for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students with prior knowledge of calculus and a college physics course. Introduction to how physical principles offer insights into modern biology, with regard to the structural, dynamical, and functional organization of biological systems. Topics include the roles of free energy, diffusion, electromotive forces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and information in fundamental biological processes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 145: Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior (BIO 245)

Ecological and evolutionary perspectives on animal behavior, with an emphasis on social and collective behavior. This is a project-based course in a lecture/seminar format. Seminars will be based on discussion of journal articles. Independent research projects on the behavior of animals on campus. Prerequisites: Biology or Human Biology core or BIO 81 and 85 or consent of instructor; Biology/ES 30. Recommended: statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gordon, D. (PI)

BIO 149: The Neurobiology of Sleep (BIO 249, HUMBIO 161)

Preference to seniors and graduate students. The neurochemistry and neurophysiology of changes in brain activity and conscious awareness associated with changes in the sleep/wake state. Behavioral and neurobiological phenomena including sleep regulation, sleep homeostasis, circadian rhythms, sleep disorders, sleep function, and the molecular biology of sleep. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Win, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 152: Imaging: Biological Light Microscopy (CSB 222, MCP 222)

This intensive laboratory and discussion course will provide participants with the theoretical and practical knowledge to utilize emerging imaging technologies based on light microscopy. Topics include microscope optics, resolution limits, Köhler illumination, confocal fluorescence, two-photon, TIRF, FRET, photobleaching, super-resolution (SIM, STED, STORM/PALM), tissue clearing/CLARITY/light-sheet microscopy, and live-cell imaging. Applications include using fluorescent probes to analyze subcellular localization and live cell-translocation dynamics. We will be using a flipped classroom for the course in that students will watch iBiology lectures before class, and class time will be used for engaging in extensive discussion. Lab portion involves extensive in-class use of microscopes in the CSIF and NMS core microscopy facilities.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Lewis, R. (PI)

BIO 154: Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology

For advanced undergraduate students. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in the organization and functions of the nervous system. Topics: wiring of the neuronal circuit, synapse structure and synaptic transmission, signal transduction in the nervous system, sensory systems, molecular basis of behavior including learning and memory, molecular pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Satisfies Central Menu Areas 2 or 3 for Bio majors. Highly recommended: BioCore or BIO 82, 83, 86, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 160: Developmental Biology

This course will cover the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of diverse cell types and tissues during embryonic and post-embryonic animal development. Topics include the role of cell-cell communication in controlling developmental decisions, the organization and patterning of large groups of cells via morphogen signaling, the specification of individual cell types, and the role of stem cells in development. The course emphasizes the experimental logic and methods of research in developmental biology and includes discussions of research papers.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Red-Horse, K. (PI)

BIO 174: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 180: Microbial Physiology (EARTHSYS 255, ESS 255, GEOLSCI 233A)

Introduction to the physiology of microbes including cellular structure, transcription and translation, growth and metabolism, mechanisms for stress resistance and the formation of microbial communities. These topics will be covered in relation to the evolution of early life on Earth, ancient ecosystems, and the interpretation of the rock record. Recommended: introductory biology and chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Welander, P. (PI)

BIO 182: Modeling Cultural Evolution (BIO 282)

Seminar. Quantitative models for the evolution of socially transmitted traits. Rates of change of learned traits in populations and patterns of cultural diversity as a function of innovation and cultural transmission. Learning in constant and changing environments. Possible avenues for gene-culture coevolution.
Terms: Win, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Feldman, M. (PI)

BIO 193: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Human Health Research (BIOE 193, CHEM 113, CHEMENG 193)

For undergraduate students participating in the Stanford ChEM-H Undergraduate Scholars Program. This course will expose students to interdisciplinary research questions and approaches that span chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Focus is on the development and practice of scientific reading, writing, and presentation skills intended to complement hands-on laboratory research. Students will read scientific articles, write research proposals, make posters, and give presentations.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 196B: Biology Senior Reflection

Capstone course series for seniors. Creative, self-reflective and scientifically relevant projects conceived, produced and exhibited over the course of three quarters. Explore scientific content of personal interest through creative forms including but not limited to writing, music, fine arts, performing arts, photography, film or new media. A written essay on the creative process and scientific significance of the selected topic will accompany the creative work. Completed projects may be included in a creative portfolio. Required enrollment in 196A,B,C. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 197WA: Senior Writing Project: The Personal Essay in Biology

Seminar focused on writing. Compose, workshop and revise scientifically relevant and personal essays in biology directed at a mainstream audience, interweaving research, interview, memoir, and other elements of nonfiction craft. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Todhunter, A. (PI)

BIO 198: Directed Reading in Biology

Individually arranged under the supervision of members of the faculty.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 198X: Out-of-Department Directed Reading

Individually arranged under the supervision of members of the faculty. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department faculty is restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. See https://biology.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-research/directed-reading for information and petitions. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 199: Advanced Research Laboratory in Experimental Biology

Individual research taken by arrangement with in-department instructors. See http://biohonors.stanford.edu for information on research sponsors, units, and credit for summer research. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 199W: Senior Honors Thesis: How to Effectively Write About Scientific Research

Workshop. For seniors pursuing an honors thesis in a biology-focused major or program. Focus on improving scientific writing and synthesizing in the context of students' individual research projects. Complete literature review which will form the basis for the thesis introduction. Develop methods section of the thesis. Small seminar-style discussion sections with research-based discussions, student led PowerPoint presentations, and writing workshops. Co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in 199 or 199X or equivalent. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kim, S. (PI)

BIO 199X: Out-of-Department Advanced Research Laboratory in Experimental Biology

Individual research by arrangement with out-of-department instructors. Credit for 199X is restricted to declared Biology majors and requires department approval. See https://biology.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-research/research for information on research sponsors, units, petitions, deadlines, credit for summer research, and out-of-Stanford research. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barres, B. (PI); Beachy, P. (PI); Bergmann, D. (PI); Bertozzi, C. (PI); Bhutani, N. (PI); Block, B. (PI); Block, S. (PI); Brunet, A. (PI); Chang, H. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Cheng, A. (PI); Clandinin, T. (PI); Crowder, L. (PI); Cui, B. (PI); Cyert, M. (PI); Daily, G. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Denny, M. (PI); Dirzo, R. (PI); Egan, E. (PI); Ehrlich, P. (PI); Feldman, M. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fernald, R. (PI); Field, C. (PI); Fraser, H. (PI); Frydman, J. (PI); Fuller, M. (PI); Garcia, C. (PI); Gilly, W. (PI); Gordon, D. (PI); Gozani, O. (PI); Graves, E. (PI); Hadly, E. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hanawalt, P. (PI); Heller, H. (PI); Jones, P. (PI); Khavari, P. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Knutson, B. (PI); Kopito, R. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Levitt, M. (PI); Long, J. (PI); Long, S. (PI); Longaker, M. (PI); Lowe, C. (PI); Luo, L. (PI); MacIver, M. (PI); Madison, D. (PI); Martinez, O. (PI); McConnell, S. (PI); Micheli, F. (PI); Monack, D. (PI); Monje-Deisseroth, M. (PI); Morrison, A. (PI); Mudgett, M. (PI); Napel, S. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nelson, W. (PI); Newman, A. (PI); O'Brien, L. (PI); Oro, A. (PI); Palmer, T. (PI); Palumbi, S. (PI); Petrov, D. (PI); Plant, G. (PI); Pollack, J. (PI); Prince, D. (PI); Puglisi, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raymond, J. (PI); Red-Horse, K. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Sapolsky, R. (PI); Schnitzer, M. (PI); Shamloo, M. (PI); Shatz, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Simon, M. (PI); Skotheim, J. (PI); Stearns, T. (PI); Steinberg, G. (PI); Stevenson, D. (PI); Stoyanova, T. (PI); Straight, A. (PI); Sudhof, T. (PI); Thompson, S. (PI); Tuljapurkar, S. (PI); Vitousek, P. (PI); Walbot, V. (PI); Wang, K. (PI); Weissman, I. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wyss-Coray, T. (PI); Zhao, H. (PI)

BIO 200: Advance Molecular Biology: Epigenetics and Proteostasis (BIO 104)

Molecular mechanisms that govern the replication, recombination, and expression of eukaryotic genomes. Topics: DNA replication, DNA recombination, gene transcription, RNA splicing, regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and protein folding. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1. Prerequisite: Biology core or BIO 83 (BIO 82 and 86 are strongly recommended).
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 214: Advanced Cell Biology (BIOC 224, MCP 221)

For Ph.D. students. Taught from the current literature on cell structure, function, and dynamics. Topics include complex cell phenomena such as cell division, apoptosis, signaling, compartmentalization, transport and trafficking, motility and adhesion, and differentiation. Weekly reading of current papers from the primary literature. Preparation of an original research proposal. Prerequisite for advanced undergraduates: BIO 129A or 160, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIO 226: Introduction to Biophysics (APPPHYS 205, BIO 126)

Core course appropriate for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students with prior knowledge of calculus and a college physics course. Introduction to how physical principles offer insights into modern biology, with regard to the structural, dynamical, and functional organization of biological systems. Topics include the roles of free energy, diffusion, electromotive forces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and information in fundamental biological processes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 239: The Hidden Kingdom - Evolution, Ecology and Diversity of Fungi (BIO 115)

Fungi are critical, yet often hidden, components of the biosphere. They regulate decomposition, are primary partners in plant symbiosis and strongly impact agriculture and economics. Students will explore the fascinating world of fungal biology, ecology and evolution via lecture, lab, field exercises and Saturday field trips that will provide traditional and molecular experiences in the collection, analysis and industrial use of diverse fungi. Students will chose an environmental niche, collect and identify resident fungi, and hypothesize about their community relationship. Prerequisite: Bio 43 or BIO 81, 85 recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Peay, K. (PI)

BIO 244: Fundamentals of Molecular Evolution (BIO 113)

The inference of key molecular evolutionary processes from DNA and protein sequences. Topics include random genetic drift, coalescent models, effects and tests of natural selection, combined effects of linkage and natural selection, codon bias and genome evolution. Satisfies Central Menu Areas 1 or 4. Prerequisites: Biology core or BIO 82, 85 or graduate standing in any department, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Petrov, D. (PI)

BIO 245: Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior (BIO 145)

Ecological and evolutionary perspectives on animal behavior, with an emphasis on social and collective behavior. This is a project-based course in a lecture/seminar format. Seminars will be based on discussion of journal articles. Independent research projects on the behavior of animals on campus. Prerequisites: Biology or Human Biology core or BIO 81 and 85 or consent of instructor; Biology/ES 30. Recommended: statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gordon, D. (PI)

BIO 249: The Neurobiology of Sleep (BIO 149, HUMBIO 161)

Preference to seniors and graduate students. The neurochemistry and neurophysiology of changes in brain activity and conscious awareness associated with changes in the sleep/wake state. Behavioral and neurobiological phenomena including sleep regulation, sleep homeostasis, circadian rhythms, sleep disorders, sleep function, and the molecular biology of sleep. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Win, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 254: Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology (NBIO 254)

For graduate students. Includes lectures for BIO 154. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in the organization and functions of the nervous system. Topics: wiring of the neuronal circuit, synapse structure and synaptic transmission, signal transduction in the nervous system, sensory systems, molecular basis of behavior including learning and memory, molecular pathogenesis of neurological diseases.
Terms: Win, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 274: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 282: Modeling Cultural Evolution (BIO 182)

Seminar. Quantitative models for the evolution of socially transmitted traits. Rates of change of learned traits in populations and patterns of cultural diversity as a function of innovation and cultural transmission. Learning in constant and changing environments. Possible avenues for gene-culture coevolution.
Terms: Win, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Feldman, M. (PI)

BIO 287A: Advanced Topics in Mathematical Evolutionary Biology

Focused examination of specific topics in mathematical evolutionary biology. Course themes may include: mathematical properties of statistics used in human population genetics, mathematics of evolutionary trees, and the intersection of population genetics and phylogenetics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rosenberg, N. (PI)

BIO 290: Teaching of Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 291: Development and Teaching of Core Experimental Laboratories

Preparation for teaching the core experimental courses (44X and 44Y). Emphasis is on lab, speaking, and writing skills. Focus is on updating the lab to meet the changing technical needs of the students. Taken prior to teaching either of the above courses. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: selection by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Malladi, S. (PI)

BIO 292: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree requirements.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 296: TA Training in Biology

Workshop to provide teaching assistants in the Department of Biology with basic training, support, and professional development in their teaching roles. Should be taken concurrently with the first TA position.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Imam, J. (PI)

BIO 299: Biology PhD Lab Rotation

Limited to first year Biology PhD students. Lab rotations with Biosciences faculty.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mudgett, M. (PI)

BIO 300: Graduate Research

For graduate students only. Individual research by arrangement with in-department instructors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 300X: Out-of-Department Graduate Research

Individual research by arrangement with out-of-department instructors. Master's students: credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors is restricted to Biology students and requires approved department petition. See http://biohonors.stanford.edu for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Axelrod, J. (PI); Barna, M. (PI); Bergmann, D. (PI); Bertozzi, C. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bintu, L. (PI); Block, B. (PI); Block, S. (PI); Brandman, O. (PI); Brunet, A. (PI); Bustamante, C. (PI); Cimprich, K. (PI); Clandinin, T. (PI); Contag, C. (PI); Crowder, L. (PI); Curtis, C. (PI); Cyert, M. (PI); Daily, G. (PI); Davis, R. (PI); Demirci, U. (PI); Denny, M. (PI); Ding, J. (PI); Dirzo, R. (PI); Ehrlich, P. (PI); Feldman, M. (PI); Fernald, R. (PI); Field, C. (PI); Fire, A. (PI); Fraser, H. (PI); Frommer, W. (PI); Frydman, J. (PI); Fukami, T. (PI); Gilly, W. (PI); Gitler, A. (PI); Gordon, D. (PI); Gozani, O. (PI); Hadly, E. (PI); Hanawalt, P. (PI); Heller, H. (PI); Huang, P. (PI); Jackson, P. (PI); Jarosz, D. (PI); Jones, P. (PI); Khavari, P. (PI); Khosla, C. (PI); Kopito, R. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Lin, M. (PI); Long, S. (PI); Lowe, C. (PI); Luo, L. (PI); McConnell, S. (PI); Micheli, F. (PI); Montgomery, S. (PI); Mordecai, E. (PI); Morrison, A. (PI); Mudgett, M. (PI); Nelson, W. (PI); O'Brien, L. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Palumbi, S. (PI); Petrov, D. (PI); Pringle, J. (PI); Puglisi, J. (PI); Rando, T. (PI); Red-Horse, K. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Salzman, J. (PI); Sapolsky, R. (PI); Scherrer, G. (PI); Schnitzer, M. (PI); Sebastiano, V. (PI); Shapiro, L. (PI); Shatz, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shenoy, K. (PI); Sherlock, G. (PI); Simon, M. (PI); Skotheim, J. (PI); Stearns, T. (PI); Steinman, L. (PI); Straight, A. (PI); Theriot, J. (PI); Thompson, S. (PI); Tuljapurkar, S. (PI); Vitousek, P. (PI); Walbot, V. (PI); Wang, B. (PI); Wernig, M. (PI); Wu, J. (PI)

BIO 301: Frontiers in Biology

Limited to and required of first-year Ph.D. students in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Current research in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology emphasizing primary research literature. Held in conjunction with the department's Monday seminar series. Students and faculty meet weekly before the seminar for a student presentation and discussion of upcoming papers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 303: Current Topics and Concepts in Population Biology, Ecology, and Evolution

Required of first-year PhD students in population biology, and ecology and evolution. Major conceptual issues and developing topics. This course isnnopen only to Biology PhD students and is not open to auditors."
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Feldman, M. (PI)

BIO 332: Evolutionary Genomics

We will read classic and modern papers relevant to evolutionary genomics, and discuss. We will cover a broad range of topics, methods, and species.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fraser, H. (PI)

BIO 342: Plant Biology Seminar

Topics in plant biology presented at a weekly seminar. Topics announced at the beginning of each quarter. Current literature. May be repeated for credit. See https://dpb.carnegiescience.edu/events.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 346: Advanced Seminar on Prokaryotic Molecular Biology (CSB 346, GENE 346)

Enrollment limited to PhD students associated with departmental research groups in genetics or molecular biology.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 383: Seminar in Population Genetics

Literature review, research, and current problems in the theory and practice of population genetics and molecular evolution. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Feldman, M. (PI)

BIO 390: Topics in Biology

Seminar. Topics in biology ranging from neurobiology to ecology.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Heller, H. (PI)

BIO 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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