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BIO 3: Frontiers in Marine Biology

An introduction to contemporary research in marine biology, including ecology, conservation biology, environmental toxicology, behavior, biomechanics, evolution, neurobiology, and molecular biology. Emphasis is on new discoveries and the technologies used to make them. Weekly lectures by faculty from the Hopkins Marine Station.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 12N: Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals

Animals living in the oceans experience a highly varied range of environmental stimuli. An aquatic lifestyle requires an equally rich range of sensory adaptations, including some that are totally foreign to us. In this course we will examine sensory system in marine animals from both an environmental and behavioral perspective and from the point of view of neuroscience and information systems engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 45: Introduction to Laboratory Research in Cell and Molecular Biology

Investigate yeast strains that are engineered to express the human tumor suppressor protein, p53, and use modern molecular methods to identify the functional consequences of p53 mutations isolated from tumor cells. Learn about the protein's role as Guardian of the Genome through lectures and by reading and discussing journal articles. Use molecular visualization programs to examine the structure of normal and mutant p53 proteins. Assay the ability of mutant p53 to direct expression of several reporter genes. During guided reflection, investigate further and identify what could be wrong with the p53 mutants you have been studying. Conduct lab experiments to test hypotheses, analyze data, and present your findings through a team oral presentation, as well as a scientific poster. Although there are no pre-requisites to enroll in this class, having taken CHEM 31X, or 31A and B, and 33 and being concurrently enrolled or past enrollment in appropriate Biology Foundation classes or HumBio core classes is recommended. Note: This class has a $25 course fee.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 81: Introduction to Ecology

This course will introduce you to the first principles of the science of ecology, the study of interactions between organisms and their environment. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 82: Genetics

The focus of the course is on the basic mechanisms underlying the transmission of genetic information and on the use of genetic analysis to study biological and medical questions. Major topics will include: (1) the use of existing genetic variation in humans and other species to identify genes that play an important role in determining traits and disease-susceptibility, (2) the analysis of mutations in model organisms and their use in the investigation of biological processes and questions and (3) using genetic information for diagnosis and the potential for genetic manipulations to treat disease. Prerequisites: None, but BIO 83 is recommended.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 124: Topics in Cancer Biology

This discussion-based course will explore the scientific tools used to study the molecular and genetic basis of cancer and to develop treatments for this disease. Topics covered may include cancer models, traditional and targeted cancer therapies, and the development of resistance to treatment. Students will develop skills in critical reading of primary research articles and will also complete a final project. Prerequisites: Human Biology core or BIO 82, 83, 86, or with permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Imam, J. (PI)

BIO 138: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 238, EARTHSYS 139, EARTHSYS 239)

This course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins and then a primary focus on its recent development and frontiers. The principal aim of the course is to enable new research and real-world applications of InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) tools and approaches. We will discuss the interconnections between people and nature and key research frontiers, such as in the realms of biodiversity, resilience, human health, poverty alleviation, and sustainable development. The science we¿ll explore is in the service of decisions, and we will use examples from real life to illustrate why this science is so critical to informing why, where, how, and how much people need nature. Prerequisite. Basic to intermediate GIS skills are required (including working with raster, vector and tabular data; loading and editing rasters, shapefiles, and tables into a GIS; understanding coordinate systems; and performing basic raster math).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 141: Biostatistics (STATS 141)

Introductory statistical methods for biological data: describing data (numerical and graphical summaries); introduction to probability; and statistical inference (hypothesis tests and confidence intervals). Intermediate statistical methods: comparing groups (analysis of variance); analyzing associations (linear and logistic regression); and methods for categorical data (contingency tables and odds ratio). Course content integrated with statistical computing in R.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Holmes, S. (PI)

BIO 147: Ecosystem Ecology and Biogeochemistry (BIO 240, EARTHSYS 147, EARTHSYS 247)

An introduction to ecosystem ecology and terrestrial biogeochemistry. This course will focus on the dynamics of carbon and other biologically essential elements in the Earth System, on spatial scales from local to global. Prerequisites: Biology 117, Earth Systems 111, or graduate standing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vitousek, P. (PI)

BIO 151: Mechanisms of Neuron Death

For undergraduates with backgrounds in neuroscience. Cell and molecular biology of neuron death during neurological disease. Topics: the amyloid diseases (Alzheimer's), prion diseases (kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob), oxygen radical diseases (Parkinson's and ALS), triplet repeat diseases (Huntington's), and AIDS-related dementia. Student presentations. Enrollment limited to 15; application required. Apply at http://web.stanford.edu/~thankes/2019bioapp.fb by 4:30pm on Wednesday, September 25, 2019.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sapolsky, R. (PI)

BIO 152: Imaging: Biological Light Microscopy (MCP 222)

This intensive laboratory and discussion course will provide participants with the theoretical and practical knowledge to utilize emerging imaging technologies based on light microscopy. Topics include microscope optics, resolution limits, Köhler illumination, confocal fluorescence, two-photon, TIRF, FRET, photobleaching, super-resolution (SIM, STED, STORM/PALM), tissue clearing/CLARITY/light-sheet microscopy, and live-cell imaging. Applications include using fluorescent probes to analyze subcellular localization and live cell-translocation dynamics. We will be using a flipped classroom for the course in that students will watch iBiology lectures before class, and class time will be used for engaging in extensive discussion. Lab portion involves extensive in-class use of microscopes in the CSIF and NMS core microscopy facilities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIO 155: Cell and Developmental Biology of Plants (BIO 255)

In this course we will learn how plants are built at different organizational scales from the cell, tissue, organ and organ system level. We will also learn about the experimental methods used to study plants at these different organizational levels and how to interpret and evaluate experiments that use such methods. Broadly relevant skills that will be cultivated in the course include: evaluating primarily literature, identifying gaps in knowledge, formulating research questions and designing new experimental strategies. Prerequisites: BIO 80 series
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dinneny, J. (PI)

BIO 161: Organismal Biology Lab

This laboratory is a genuine research experience course where students will contribute to original research in a field of organismal biology. The course will consist of two modules: In the first module, students will perform a drug screen for novel compounds that influence animal behavior. In the second module, students will use gene editing technologies to test the role of specific proteins involved in mental diseases. Students will work collaboratively to collect and analyze data and will learn to communicate their findings clearly through oral and written formats. Prerequisites: BIO 82 or BIO 84 required or concurrent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; O'Connell, L. (PI)

BIO 171: Principles of Cell Cycle Control (BIO 271, CSB 271)

Genetic analysis of the key regulatory circuits governing the control of cell division. Illustration of key principles that can be generalized to other synthetic and natural biological circuits. Focus on tractable model organisms; growth control; irreversible biochemical switches; chromosome duplication; mitosis; DNA damage checkpoints; MAPK pathway-cell cycle interface; oncogenesis. Analysis of classic and current primary literature. Satisfies Central Menu Area 2.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Skotheim, J. (PI)

BIO 196A: Biology Senior Reflection

Capstone course series for seniors. Creative, self-reflective and scientifically relevant projects conceived, produced and exhibited over the course of three quarters. Explore scientific content of personal interest through creative forms including but not limited to writing, music, fine arts, performing arts, photography, film or new media. A written essay on the creative process and scientific significance of the selected topic will accompany the creative work. Completed projects may be included in a creative portfolio. Required enrollment in 196A,B,C. Satisfies WIM in Biology. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Todhunter, A. (PI)

BIO 198: Directed Reading in Biology

Individually arranged under the supervision of members of the faculty.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 198X: Out-of-Department Directed Reading

Individually arranged under the supervision of members of the faculty. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department faculty is restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. See https://biology.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-research/directed-reading for information and petitions. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 199: Advanced Research Laboratory in Experimental Biology

Individual research taken by arrangement with in-department instructors. See http://biohonors.stanford.edu for information on research sponsors, units, and credit for summer research. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 199X: Out-of-Department Advanced Research Laboratory in Experimental Biology

Individual research by arrangement with out-of-department instructors. Credit for 199X is restricted to declared Biology majors and requires department approval. See https://biology.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-research/research for information on research sponsors, units, petitions, deadlines, credit for summer research, and out-of-Stanford research. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barres, B. (PI); Beachy, P. (PI); Bergmann, D. (PI); Bertozzi, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhutani, N. (PI); Blau, H. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Block, B. (PI); Block, S. (PI); Brunet, A. (PI); Chang, H. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Cheng, A. (PI); Clandinin, T. (PI); Crowder, L. (PI); Cui, B. (PI); Cyert, M. (PI); Daily, G. (PI); Davis, M. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Denny, M. (PI); Dirzo, R. (PI); Egan, E. (PI); Ehrlich, P. (PI); Feldman, M. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fernald, R. (PI); Field, C. (PI); Fraser, H. (PI); Frydman, J. (PI); Garcia, C. (PI); Gilly, W. (PI); Gordon, D. (PI); Gozani, O. (PI); Graves, E. (PI); Gurtner, G. (PI); Hadly, E. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hanawalt, P. (PI); Heller, H. (PI); Heller, S. (PI); Jeffrey, S. (PI); Jones, P. (PI); Khavari, P. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Knutson, B. (PI); Kopito, R. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Long, J. (PI); Long, S. (PI); Longaker, M. (PI); Lowe, C. (PI); Luo, L. (PI); MacIver, M. (PI); Madison, D. (PI); Martinez, O. (PI); McConnell, S. (PI); Micheli, F. (PI); Monack, D. (PI); Monje-Deisseroth, M. (PI); Morrison, A. (PI); Mudgett, M. (PI); Nadeau, K. (PI); Napel, S. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nelson, W. (PI); O'Brien, L. (PI); Oro, A. (PI); Palmer, T. (PI); Palumbi, S. (PI); Petrov, D. (PI); Pitteri, S. (PI); Plant, G. (PI); Pollack, J. (PI); Porteus, M. (PI); Prince, D. (PI); Puglisi, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raymond, J. (PI); Red-Horse, K. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Sapolsky, R. (PI); Schnitzer, M. (PI); Shamloo, M. (PI); Shatz, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Simon, M. (PI); Skotheim, J. (PI); Stearns, T. (PI); Steinberg, G. (PI); Stevenson, D. (PI); Straight, A. (PI); Sudhof, T. (PI); Thompson, S. (PI); Ting, A. (PI); Tuljapurkar, S. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vitousek, P. (PI); Walbot, V. (PI); Weissman, I. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wyss-Coray, T. (PI); Zhao, H. (PI)

BIO 230: Molecular and Cellular Immunology

Mechanisms of immune responses in health and disease; innate and adaptive immunity; development of the immune system; molecular biology, structure, and function of antibodies and T-cell receptors; cellular basis of immune responses and their regulation; genetic control of immune responses and disease susceptibility; immunotherapies for treating diseases. Lectures and discussion in class and in sections. Satisfies Central Menu Areas 1 or 2. For upper class undergraduate and graduate students who have not had an introductory immunology course. Prerequisites for undergraduates: Biology Core, Human Biology Core, or BIO 83 and 86, or consent of instructor. For graduate students: College-level molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jones, P. (PI)

BIO 230A: Molecular and Cellular Immunology Literature Review

Special discussion section for graduate students. Supplement to BIO 230. Pre- or corequisite: BIO 230 or other introductory immunology course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jones, P. (PI)

BIO 231: Structural Equation Modeling for Ecologists

We will focus on learning to use structural equation modeling (SEM) as a technique for ecological inference. Class will include short lectures, paper discussions, and SEM coding workshops in R. Meetings will generally last only 60 minutes.
Terms: Aut, offered once only | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Miller, J. (PI)

BIO 238: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 138, EARTHSYS 139, EARTHSYS 239)

This course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins and then a primary focus on its recent development and frontiers. The principal aim of the course is to enable new research and real-world applications of InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) tools and approaches. We will discuss the interconnections between people and nature and key research frontiers, such as in the realms of biodiversity, resilience, human health, poverty alleviation, and sustainable development. The science we¿ll explore is in the service of decisions, and we will use examples from real life to illustrate why this science is so critical to informing why, where, how, and how much people need nature. Prerequisite. Basic to intermediate GIS skills are required (including working with raster, vector and tabular data; loading and editing rasters, shapefiles, and tables into a GIS; understanding coordinate systems; and performing basic raster math).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 240: Ecosystem Ecology and Biogeochemistry (BIO 147, EARTHSYS 147, EARTHSYS 247)

An introduction to ecosystem ecology and terrestrial biogeochemistry. This course will focus on the dynamics of carbon and other biologically essential elements in the Earth System, on spatial scales from local to global. Prerequisites: Biology 117, Earth Systems 111, or graduate standing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vitousek, P. (PI)

BIO 255: Cell and Developmental Biology of Plants (BIO 155)

In this course we will learn how plants are built at different organizational scales from the cell, tissue, organ and organ system level. We will also learn about the experimental methods used to study plants at these different organizational levels and how to interpret and evaluate experiments that use such methods. Broadly relevant skills that will be cultivated in the course include: evaluating primarily literature, identifying gaps in knowledge, formulating research questions and designing new experimental strategies. Prerequisites: BIO 80 series
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dinneny, J. (PI)

BIO 271: Principles of Cell Cycle Control (BIO 171, CSB 271)

Genetic analysis of the key regulatory circuits governing the control of cell division. Illustration of key principles that can be generalized to other synthetic and natural biological circuits. Focus on tractable model organisms; growth control; irreversible biochemical switches; chromosome duplication; mitosis; DNA damage checkpoints; MAPK pathway-cell cycle interface; oncogenesis. Analysis of classic and current primary literature. Satisfies Central Menu Area 2.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Skotheim, J. (PI)

BIO 273A: Environmental Microbiology I (CEE 274A, CHEMENG 174, CHEMENG 274)

Basics of microbiology and biochemistry. The biochemical and biophysical principles of biochemical reactions, energetics, and mechanisms of energy conservation. Diversity of microbial catabolism, flow of organic matter in nature: the carbon cycle, and biogeochemical cycles. Bacterial physiology, phylogeny, and the ecology of microbes in soil and marine sediments, bacterial adhesion, and biofilm formation. Microbes in the degradation of pollutants. Prerequisites: CHEM 33,CHEM 121 (formerly CHEM 35), and BIOSCI 41, CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188), or equivalents.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 287A: Advanced Topics in Mathematical Evolutionary Biology

Focused examination of specific topics in mathematical evolutionary biology. Course themes may include: mathematical properties of statistics used in human population genetics, mathematics of evolutionary trees, and the intersection of population genetics and phylogenetics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rosenberg, N. (PI)

BIO 290: Teaching Practicum in Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical, supervised teaching experience in a biology lab or lecture course. Training often includes attending lectures, initiating and planning discussion sections, and assisting in the preparation course materials. May be repeated for credit.nPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 291: Development and Teaching of Core Experimental Laboratories

Preparation for teaching the core experimental courses (44X and 44Y). Emphasis is on lab, speaking, and writing skills. Focus is on updating the lab to meet the changing technical needs of the students. Taken prior to teaching either of the above courses. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: selection by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Malladi, S. (PI)

BIO 294: Cellular Biophysics (APPPHYS 294, BIOPHYS 294)

Physical biology of dynamical and mechanical processes in cells. Emphasis is on qualitative understanding of biological functions through quantitative analysis and simple mathematical models. Sensory transduction, signaling, adaptation, switches, molecular motors, actin and microtubules, motility, and circadian clocks. Prerequisites: differential equations and introductory statistical mechanics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fisher, D. (PI)

BIO 296: Teaching and Learning in Biology

This course provides students teaching in the Department of Biology with basic training, support, and professional development in their teaching roles. Topics include student engagement, assessment, feedback and more. Should be taken concurrently with the first teaching position.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Imam, J. (PI)

BIO 299: Biology PhD Lab Rotation

Limited to first year Biology PhD students. Lab rotations with Biosciences faculty.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dinneny, J. (PI)

BIO 300X: Out-of-Department Graduate Research

Individual research by arrangement with out-of-department instructors. Master's students: credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors is restricted to Biology students and requires approved department petition. See http://biohonors.stanford.edu for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Axelrod, J. (PI); Barna, M. (PI); Bergmann, D. (PI); Bertozzi, C. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bintu, L. (PI); Block, B. (PI); Block, S. (PI); Brandman, O. (PI); Brunet, A. (PI); Bustamante, C. (PI); Cegelski, L. (PI); Cimprich, K. (PI); Clandinin, T. (PI); Contag, C. (PI); Crowder, L. (PI); Curtis, C. (PI); Cyert, M. (PI); Daily, G. (PI); Davis, R. (PI); Demirci, U. (PI); Denny, M. (PI); Ding, J. (PI); Dirzo, R. (PI); Ehrlich, P. (PI); Feldman, M. (PI); Fernald, R. (PI); Field, C. (PI); Fire, A. (PI); Fraser, H. (PI); Frommer, W. (PI); Frydman, J. (PI); Fukami, T. (PI); Gilly, W. (PI); Gitler, A. (PI); Gordon, D. (PI); Gozani, O. (PI); Hadly, E. (PI); Hanawalt, P. (PI); Heller, H. (PI); Huang, P. (PI); Jackson, P. (PI); Jarosz, D. (PI); Jones, P. (PI); Khavari, P. (PI); Khosla, C. (PI); Kopito, R. (PI); Krasnow, M. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Lin, M. (PI); Long, J. (PI); Long, S. (PI); Lowe, C. (PI); Luo, L. (PI); McConnell, S. (PI); Micheli, F. (PI); Montgomery, S. (PI); Mordecai, E. (PI); Morrison, A. (PI); Mudgett, M. (PI); Nelson, W. (PI); O'Brien, L. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Palumbi, S. (PI); Petrov, D. (PI); Pringle, J. (PI); Puglisi, J. (PI); Rando, T. (PI); Red-Horse, K. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Salzman, J. (PI); Sapolsky, R. (PI); Scherrer, G. (PI); Schnitzer, M. (PI); Sebastiano, V. (PI); Shapiro, L. (PI); Shatz, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shenoy, K. (PI); Sherlock, G. (PI); Simon, M. (PI); Skotheim, J. (PI); Stearns, T. (PI); Steinman, L. (PI); Straight, A. (PI); Theriot, J. (PI); Thompson, S. (PI); Tuljapurkar, S. (PI); Vitousek, P. (PI); Walbot, V. (PI); Wang, B. (PI); Wernig, M. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wysocka, J. (PI)

BIO 301: Frontiers in Biology

Limited to and required of first-year Ph.D. students in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Current research in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology emphasizing primary research literature. Held in conjunction with the department's Monday seminar series. Students and faculty meet weekly before the seminar for a student presentation and discussion of upcoming papers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 302: Current Topics and Concepts in Population Biology, Ecology, and Evolution

Required of first-year PhD students in population biology, and ecology and evolution. Major conceptual issues and developing topics. This course isnnopen only to Biology PhD students and is not open to auditors."
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Feldman, M. (PI)

BIO 346: Advanced Seminar on Prokaryotic Molecular Biology (CSB 346, GENE 346)

Enrollment limited to PhD students associated with departmental research groups in genetics or molecular biology.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 383: Seminar in Population Genetics

Literature review, research, and current problems in the theory and practice of population genetics and molecular evolution. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Feldman, M. (PI)

BIO 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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