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ARTSTUDI 10AX: Filmmaking

Production skills and project development in documentary filmmaking. The fundamentals of filmmaking using digital video production techniques focused on documentary storytelling. Shooting in mini-DV format and editing with Final Cut Pro software, students actualize their ideas in an audiovisual medium from conceptualization through post-production and exhhibition.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 11A: Drawing: Means & Alternate Means

The first half of the quarter students explore more traditional ways of drawing(still life,models,etc..) to develop a hand/eye relationship. The class will focus on seeing and documenting what is in front of them. The second half of the quarter expands into using alternative means of mark making to deconstruct and re-construct ideas learned in the first half of the quarter. String, tape, body parts and shadows are all fair game. This will be a lively class. The students are graded on their attendance, participation, weekly assignments and one final assignment consisting of two finished works, one being traditional, the other experimental.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 11AX: Digital Art and Design in Practice

Hands-on exploration of art and design using digital tools. Overview of contemporary digital art and design including fine art, graphic design, film, and animation. Analysis of new work in these areas and visits to Bay Area production and artist studios. Demos will focus on 2D and time-based techniques, but students interested in procedural or 3D computer graphic are welcome. Students will complete a multi-part visual project to be included in a final exhibit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 12AX: Drawing Intensive: Revisiting Nature

As increasing technological advances can further separate us from direct impressions of nature, this class is designed to reconnect and enhance our relationship to the natural world and our surrounding environment. To do this we will develop visual skills and critical thinking through careful observation and classical drawing techniques.nInspired by Stanford's natural and manicured landscapes, students will enjoy the great outdoors while learning elements of perspective, composition, light, and form. Students will learn about master landscape artists, investigate the built and natural environment of the campus, and experiment with various drawing techniques, mediums, and styles.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 13A: Fundamentals of Oil Painting

This course is an introduction to oil painting. Students concentrate primarily on the technical aspects of the medium (i.e. how to paint as opposed to what to paint.) We examine color: how to mix it, how it establishes spatial relationships, light, and shadow. The class progresses through a series of problems designed to develop a sensitivity to paint application and surface quality; as well as to value, composition, volume, light, and space as the necessary elements of recreating perceptual experience. By the end of the course, students are able to apply some sophisticated techniques to visual problem solving. The aim of the course is to demonstrate the mechanical structure of oil painting.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 13AX: Photography

This hands-on course in photography will emphasize the techniques, aesthetics, and conceptual considerations of traditional black and white photography. Students will also explore photography's history and applications as an expressive tool, with the power to communicate ideas and move the viewer.nnThroughout the course, students will master the use of their own manual 35mm camera and process the film themselves in our lab. They will also learn the techniques needed to make quality black and white prints in the darkroom. Students will coordinate an exhibition and present their finest work in a professional manner.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 13BX: Narrative Painting For Non-Majors

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of painting using acrylic paints, while simultaneously examining the narrative in visual art. Content for this course will be centered on how human experience is remembered and transformed through self-reflexive, experiential learning that connects our artwork to our personal lives. Formal issues will include the use of color, paint handling, value, and composition. Students will become familiar with the materials through hands-on demonstrations, discussions of historical context for the medium, and in-class critiques. We will also discuss surface preparation, clean-up, and safety. Slide lectures, readings, and a visit to the Cantor museum will enhance studio work time. Drawing background preferred but not required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 14: Drawing for Non-Majors

Functional anatomy and perspective as they apply to problems of drawing the form in space. Individual and group instruction as students work from still life set-ups, nature, and the model. Emphasis is on the development of critical skills and perceptual drawing techniques for those with little or no previous experience with graphite, charcoal, conte, and inks. Lectures alternate with studio work
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 14AX: Sculpture and the Expanded Field

Sculpture involves space, materials, techniques, and ideas. It is an art of the extraordinary as well as the everyday. No longer tied to architecture, mimesis, or commemorative representation, sculpture now appears in a variety of forms including as installations, collaborations, projections, appropriations, interventions, performances, and experimental projects that address formal concerns as well as issues of identity, historical memory, narrative, economics, the environment, popular culture, technology, globalism, politics, and time. Examples of such ¿expanded¿ sculpture include public art made to attach to buildings or to be given away, inflatable homeless shelters, and wearable art for street demonstrations. The principle area of knowledge addressed in this course involves exploratory learning about the formal, historical, and global dimensions of contemporary sculptural art. Students will work alone or in groups using a range of materials from cardboard to wood, to found objects, social affects, and conceptual ideas.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 15AX: Introduction to Sculpture

This course offers a unique and interdisciplinary perspective on contemporary sculpture and art practice with the purpose of enabling artistic creation and discovery. The class will become familiar with traditional and non-traditional techniques through hands on workshops and instruction as well as lectures, visiting artists, and studio visits with working sculptors. There will be three major projects resulting in three complete works of art including a self-guided final project building on techniques and concepts covered in this course.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 16: Sculpture for Non-Majors

This class offers an opportunity for students to investigate sculpture as a method to chronicle events and understand the physical environment. Data-based approaches to three-dimensional art making will be introduced in theory and practice. The syllabus will be structured around three projects: a two week individual piece, a three week collaborative project to gain experience working at scales larger than the human body, and a four week final project. Classes will be held in the sculpture shop, and will include hands-on skill building, introduction to tool use, presentation of relevant art works, and discussion of a few assigned readings.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 16AX: Drawing Marathon

Hosted by the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting, and Sculpture and based entirely in New York, Drawing Marathon helps students learn the importance of drawing as the basis of understanding one's experience of the world. Drawing is seen here as the most direct route to the examination of our perceptions. Unorthodox tools and exercises will be introduced to broaden the students' drawing vocabulary.nThis course will investigate many implications of drawing as a physical and cerebral activity as well as drawing as a philosophy. It will discuss key issues, including those of scale, tiny to huge; the use of different formats; the use of the rectangle; the vertical axis and its significance; the nature of distortions; the compression of space and depth; the search for "form" and its consequences; space and its meaning; functions and the different kinds of space; and the nature of relational drawing.nStudents can expect to be in the studio 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. most days. The average day is spent mostly drawing from perspection and includes several group critiques; most nights accumulate in a lengthy final critique at the end of the physical drawing session. This practice intensifies for the last critique at the end of the course. Students learn to engage in clear and succinct dialogue and discussions within the group. Instruction encourages students to participate in and understand the visual language of drawing.nThe Marathons are intensive all-day programs that run for two weeks at the beginning of each semester at the acclaimed NY Studio School. Students reside in New York City during the program period. Daily drawing sessions at the Studio School, field trips, and creative exploration of the city are all included in the program. Drawing marathon is led both by full-time NYSS faculty and distinguished visiting artists. nThe Drawing Marathon is open to beginning and advanced artists, regardless of their major.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 17A: Black and White Darkroom

A beginning black & white darkroom photography class with an emphasis on project conceptualization and the utilization of local environments. Students in addition to learning photography basics, will complete a cohesive, short body(s) of work. Students work collectively to realize a group exhibition. Theme and title of the exhibition are chosen at the beginning of the quarter and projects will be developed within its framework.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 17X: Photography for Non-Majors: Discovering Photography

This course is designed to introduce the beginning photographer to the basics of making, looking at and discussing fine-art photographs. Students will learn the fundamentals of camera operation¿including focus, exposure, depth of field, and motion control. Emphasis will also be placed on learning the basic visual and linguistic vocabulary of photography through in-class discussions focused on the concerns addressed by fine-art photographers since the inception of the media. Students will be encouraged to approach their own image making with the intent of developing a series or set of images, rather than thinking in singular pictures. Admission determined on the first day of class.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 18: Introduction to Video Compositing

This course will introduce students to video editing and 3D software (After Effects, Premiere Pro, Cinema 4D), as well as techniques for combining 3D elements and video footage (chroma keying, layer based compositing, camera tracking). We will take an experimental approach to these techniques, prioritizing imagination and critical thinking. Furthermore, students will look at art pieces that involve digital editing and analyze how they integrate into contemporary fine art practice. The structure of the course is divided between lectures, where we discuss existing art projects, and a lab section, where students will receive technical guidance in their exercises and final project. The course primarily addresses students who have little or no previous experience in this field.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 24: Game Engines for Artmaking

Introduction to using Video Game Engines as art making tools. Utilizing the Unity video game authoring environment primarily, students will create interactive and dynamic artworks and artifacts within the virtual space. Rudimentary 3D scanning of physical assets merging with the creation of digital ones combine with sound, physics and simulations. Experimentation with both narrative and non-narrative forms as well as display solutions (Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Printed Sculpture and Digital Projection) is discussed and encouraged.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 31X: New Art-Cinema for Non Majors

This is a studio course in contemporary cinema art, focusing on actionable, ultra-low budget methods for creating sprawling, proprietary cinematic expressions. Students will build familiarity with the myriad tools of and approaches to digital cinema creation and their practical use in works of art. Students will also be encouraged to conceive of cinema art expansively--as an opportunity to enclose, express and explore other forms of art: the written word, sound, sculpture, image-making and performance. We will think, talk, and work through the question of the role of art in cinema, and vice versa. We will create as a class no less than two short films. For each film, students will have the opportunity to reinvent their role (thinker-actor, writer-dancer, sound recordist, location scout, human sculpture, etc.). Together, we will smash the myth of the auteur as we hone ourselves into a finely ground machine for breakneck film-making.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 112: Introduction to Silkscreen

This course will teach students the technical processes of silkscreen printing, including: vinyl stencil, sta-sharp film, drawing fluid, photo emulsion, ink mixing, multiple color registration, printing on alternative substrates, and small-run editions. Students will learn about the history of silkscreen printmaking, including its fine art applications as well as its commercial and political uses. They will learn both analog and digital silkscreen processes, making use of the department's vast array of printmaking resources, including digital printing, Photoshop, the vinyl cutter, and photographic exposure. Students will complete four assignments, learning how to create stencils both by hand and with digital processes, as well as multiple color prints and printing on alternative materials. Students will be encouraged to combine analog and digital processes in their silkscreen prints, as well as to experiment with scale, substrate, and installation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 122A: Expressive Techniques in Multimedia Installation And Live Art (TAPS 122A)

The course focus on multimedia installation and live performances. The theme of the course will be an offshoot of the campus wide celebration of the 200th year anniversary of the ¿Frankenstein¿ novel written by Mary Shelly. For the course the issues of advance medical science in the areas of artificial life forms, stem cell research, biological ethical questions, fictional and non fictional approaches and mythical creation stories will be included. Students will obtain an understanding of alternative ways to speak to issues using various art forms.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 130: Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino (ARTSTUDI 231A)

Students use electronics and software to create kinetic and interactive elements in artwork. No prior knowledge of electronics or software is required. Students learn to program the Arduino, a small easy-to-use microprocessor control unit ( see http://www.arduino.cc/ ). Learn to connect various sensors such as light, motion, sound and touch and use them to control software. Learn to interface actuators like motors, lights and solenoids to create movement. Learn to connect the Arduino to theMAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment to create media-intensive video and audio environments. Explore the social dimensions of electronic art. (lower level)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; DeMarinis, P. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 130N: Introduction to Art Practice

This hands-on introduction course will introduce students to formal and conceptual visual strategies in expression through a diversity of artistic mediums which may include drawing, digital media, printmaking, photography, performance and sculpture. This course is meant to give students an overview of many of the mediums and facilities that are available in the Art Practice program. Field trips, guest artists.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 131: Sound Art I (MUSIC 154A)

Acoustic, digital and analog approaches to sound art. Familiarization with techniques of listening, recording, digital processing and production. Required listening and readings in the history and contemporary practice of sound art. (lower level)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; DeMarinis, P. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 135B: Color Experience in Art and Life

Color is a sensation (red), a property of objects (red chair), a metaphor (red alert), a cultural phenomenon (red light district), a political statement (red flag). Color has been studied for millennia, but the open questions about it still outnumber the answered ones. In this course, a series of hands-on projects will lead you to explore color in all its complexity. You will experiment with your own color perception, study public spaces through color, and create a series of artworks that will challenge yours and spectators understanding and perception of color. You will learn how to use digital photography tools and simple physical aids to create color experiments, create unique color experiences that are impossible in the real world, manipulate color of light and objects to create spaces, and delve into cultural and philosophical topics in the class discussions and reading.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 136: The Portable Studio

Using the concept behind the Post-Studio art practice as a starting point, this course will explore what it means to make art outside (in a landscape/cityscape, etc.) instead of inside the traditional Art Studio. With technology and equipment getting smaller and more handy and with the endless stream of apps and functions available on cell phones and other mobile devices, this course will furthermore investigate how this gives the artist the ability to work on the fly and produce most of their artwork on site. Given the interdisciplinary nature of this course, the students will be given 3 assignments throughout this course, where they will be introduced to sound, video, photography, and performance art. The goal of this course is to challenge the students to think differently about the use of their mobile devices and tablets and to be creative and experimental on the spot.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lynnerup, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 138: Sound and Image

Practices that combine audio and visual media. Topics include synesthesias, visual music, film soundtracks, and immersive multimedia practices that combine sound, music, still and moving images, projections, and performance. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 139: Portraiture and Facial Anatomy for Artists (SURG 241)

Focus is on the art of portraiture and underlying structures of the face, fundamental anatomical elements such as the skull and muscles of facial expressions, and the intersections between human anatomy and art. Studio sessions incorporate plastic models, dry bones, cadaveric specimens, and live models. Encourages use of proper anatomical terminology for describing structures and their relationships.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ARTSTUDI 140: Drawing I

Functional anatomy and perspective as they apply to problems of drawing the form in space. Individual and group instruction as students work from still life set-ups, nature, and the model. Emphasis is on the development of critical skills and perceptual drawing techniques for those with little or no previous experience with pastels, inks, charcoal, conte, and pencil. Lectures alternate with studio work. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 140A: Drawing from Observation

This introductory course will provide students a technical foundation on how to accurately translate information from the eye to the hand. Line, value, and form will be employed to render a range of materials, surfaces, and objects. As the quarter progresses, students will create drawings that distort or juxtapose elements, views, or multiple scenes inside and outside the classroom. Through personal invention, the narrative elements of time and affect will be explored. Historical precedents will be discussed, giving attention to one-point and two-point perspective, Cubism, as well as other traditions and methods of organizing pictorial space. Materials will include graphite pencil, charcoal, and ink wash. All artworks will be made over the span of the class period times.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Griess, N. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 141: Plein Air Painting

Plein Air (Outdoor) Painting is a wonderful way to build skills, explore your relationship to site, and unlock your voice and hand. We will paint at different locations on and off-campus, learning a variety of painting techniques in changing weather and light. This class is great for both true beginners and advanced students. Basic painting skills are incorporated throughout the quarter, with advanced options at each stage. Acrylic paint is versatile and fast-drying; we will use it to get a range of effects from washy watercolor, blended oil effects, and building the surface sculpturally, painting on different surfaces. As we move, we will consider the elements of site and the materiality of paint: water, earth, architecture and the nuance of human gesture. History and memory are parsed in both the visible and hidden worlds around us. On-site paintings are not touched after class; rather they exist as an ephemeral moments in time. Three outside projects allow each person to paint at their own pace, and spend more time developing ideas and skills. In this class, process is privileged and ¿failure¿ is embraced. Adventure is our priority; weather is our co-creator. Final projects will be based on individual concepts, allowing each person to stretch creatively and develop their own voice.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Deas, Y. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 141S: Drawing Outdoors

In this introductory class, we take drawing out into the world, exploring different environments, techniques, and approaches as we go. The fundamental nuts-and-bolts of basic drawing techniques: light logic, depicting depth and drawing the figure, are integrated into each environment. From the Stanford campus: its cafe's, architecture and landscaping, to redwoods and water, to more urban settings, drawings will range from high-speed gestures to longer, more contemplative work. Through pen, graphite, charcoal, ink, watercolor/gouache and mixed media, we explore dichotomous relationships, as well as those in seemingly perfect harmony. We move from the inanimate to animate, figure and architecture, motion and stillness, to the micro and macro, considering how even the smallest patch of earth may be as monumental as Hoover Tower. Both beginning and advanced students are welcome. Summer.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Griess, N. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 143: Screen Print

TBA
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 144B: Eye for Color: Interaction of Color

This course will explore different types of color phenomenon through cutting and arranging colored paper and mixing paint. The goal of the course is to enhance sensitivity to color relationships. There is no such thing as a bad color or a good color, it is all relative to context. Students in this course will gain the ability to recognize and identify different types of color phenomena that exist in art and nature. The development of observation and articulation when dealing with color comes from experience, trial and error, and in doing so, one develops an individual eye for color.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yin, L. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 145: Painting I

Introduction to techniques, materials, and vocabulary in oil painting. Still life, landscape, and figure used as subject matter. Emphasis is on painting and drawing from life. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 145B: Painting for Non-Majors: Painting With the Figure

This class will deal with the figure as it is represented in two dimensional form, within the general context of painting, accounting not only for the figure, but also the painting as a whole. A variety of historical and contemporary approaches to painting the figure will be introduced, and then explored through the application of acrylic paint. Students will work from a variety of sources including, but not limited to: digital media, occasional live and inanimate models, still life, and photographs. Emphasis will be laid on a comprehensive approach to composition that deals with the human figure, representationally, abstractly, and freely - without the requirement of prior experience in art.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 145C: Introduction to Abstraction

This studio course will provide an introduction to abstract and non-objective painting and sculpture. Through a series of prompts and exercises, students will strengthen their understanding of composition, color, line, form, and material. Studio-based projects will draw upon the history of abstraction, as well as incorporate found objects and imagery to ground exploration in the immediate environment. As a class, we will consider the contemporary relevance of abstract and non-objective artworks. What does it mean to create a work of art today that is not figuratively legible? How is such work otherwise legible? Through technical exercises developed by Walter Gropius and Joseph Albers of the Bauhaus, students will develop foundational skills in composition and color theory. Experimentation, intuitive decision making, and developing one's own approach will be encouraged throughout.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scopa, S. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 146B: Art of Reclamation

This course explores reclamation, the rich process of claiming something back or reasserting a right. Through the layering of different materials to create compositions of text and image, this course will explore what the art of reclamation means at an individual, group, and community level. Can mixed media art spark intersectional dialogue? How does combining disparate materials communicate radical messages to others? Through group discussions, readings, writing sessions, and critiques we will explore the topics of the body, race, gender, and land as they relate to art practice. Students will be encouraged to experiment with two and three-dimensional approaches to four main projects. Demonstrations will consist of collage, stenciling, and image making via paint, ink, and charcoal.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 147: Art Book Object

This course explores contemporary aesthetic interpretations of the book as an art object. Students will learn to use both traditional and digital tools and techniques for creating artists¿ books, and integrate those into final works of art. The course familiarizes students with basic forms and bookbinding processes, as well as various modes of printing and production that facilitate limited artist editions. In addition to making books, we¿ll view numerous artists¿ books in the Bowes Art & Architecture Library¿s collection, and meet with practicing artists and book makers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wight, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 147S: DRAWING AND PAINTING INTENSIVE

The introductory course teaches the basic tools of drawing and oil painting. We will take advantage of Stanford's beautiful campus to draw and paint outside along with studio work and slide discussions in the classroom. Exercises begin with gestural mark-making, moving through linear perspective and tonal studies using a variety of media from graphite and charcoal to bamboo brush and ink. The introduction to oil painting explores the ways we build layers up to a finished work. Students will enter painting through color theory, strategies of abstract painting, and exposure to influential painters. Each student will acquire familiarity with foundational techniques and materials while developing their personal voice in assigned projects. No previous painting or drawing experience is necessary. Options will be provided for advanced students.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yin, L. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 148: Monotype

Introduction to printmaking using monotype, a graphic art medium used by such artists as Blake, Degas, Gauguin, and Pendergast. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 140. (lower level). May be repeated 2 times for total of 8 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chagoya, E. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 148A: Lithography

The classic technique of printing from limestones. Techniques to draw an image on the stone, etch and fix the image on the stone, and print it in numbered editions. Students work on a variety of stone sizes. Field trips to local publishers of lithography or lithography exhibitions. (lower level)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kain, K. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 148B: Introduction to Printmaking

Techniques such as monotype, monoprint, photocopy transfers, linocut and woodcut, intaglio etching. Demonstrations of these techniques. Field trips to local print collections or print exhibitions. (lower level)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wilson, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 148P: The Hybrid Print

This class explores experimental printmaking methods where digital and traditional practices collide. It focuses on the interchange between conventional and new methods of printmaking, and possibilities for the print beyond paper and the flat picture plane in contemporary art. Techniques will be demonstrated in class, and students will pursue projects using these techniques, developing their own conceptual interests. We will explore digital processes using large format printers, as well as digitally augmented traditional printmaking methods such as monoprints, collographs, woodblock and linocut, aided by dye sublimation, vinyl cutting, and 3-d printing. Students will have access to a wide array of both digital and traditional tools, and will develop projects using a combination of methods, resulting in a body of work. Discussions will address the expansive nature of contemporary fine art printmaking.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wight, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 149C: Etching

In this class students will explore various techniques of etching (or intaglio) on zinc plates such as, hard ground, soft ground, aquatint, marbling aquatint and sugar lift, through an electrolytic process that uses no acid but sulfates and very low electrical power (1.5 V or the same as a AA battery). This process is much less toxic that the traditional etching with nitric (which produces toxic fumes) or ferric acid (difficult to clean). These techniques will be complemented by other ones that can be mixed with etching such as photocopy transfers, Chine collé (attaching a different color paper between plate and main paper), and mono-printing. nnEtching/Intaglio (making a mark under the surface of the plate) is one of the most tactile and elegant forms of printmaking. The plate leaves a 3-D line mark and embossed marks in the deep etched areas as well as at the edges of the plate. Many major artists have left memorable images by working in this medium (Rembrandt, Goya, Kathe Kollwitz, Eduard Munch, and many others) influencing many contemporary artists.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 150: Sculpture: Votives, Totems and Sanctuaries

The focus of this course is to discover how meaning is inscribed into the objects and places we make. Using three forms both ancient and contemporary¿ the votive, the totem and the sanctuary¿we will consider a variety of cultural precedents made with spiritual and/or religious intensions. Students will research the origins and philosophies of chosen examples, glean formal terms, such as size, scale, composition, color and materiality and create new works with both personal and cultural meanings.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pepe, S. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 150Q: Queer Sculpture

Outlaw sensibilities, self-made kinships, chosen lineages, utopic futurity, exilic commitment, and rage at institutions that police the borders of the normal these are among the attitudes that make up queer in its contemporary usage. David J. GetsynnThis hands on studio based course explores queer as a form of art production. Artists and thinkers use queer to signal defiance to the mainstream and an embrace of difference, uniqueness and self-determination. To be intolerable is to demand that the normal, the natural and the common be challenged. To do this is not to demand inclusion, but rather to refuse to accept any operations of exclusion and erasure that make up the normal and posit compulsory sameness. Queer Sculpture is also about the strategic effort to appropriate and subvert conventional art practices and tactics that may involve everything from shifts in the content of a work and its targeted audience to the methods by which it is produced and its formal properties. The political imperatives of a queer or queered position will shape thematic investigations of practices related to utopic futurity, anti-assimilationist practices, failure, abstraction, the archive, camp, drag and alternative families. Classes will require reading, discussing, and making. Students will produce artwork for critiques and participate in discussions of the readings. The course includes guest artists and fieldtrips to local LGBTQ archives.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 151: Sculpture I

Traditional and non-traditional approaches to sculpture production through working with materials including wood, metal, and plaster. Conceptual and technical skills, and safe and appropriate use of tools and materials. Impact of material and technique upon form and content; the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Historical and contemporary forming methods provide a theoretical basis for studio work. Field trips; guest lecturers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 153: Ecology of Materials

Studio-based sculpture course. Materials used in sculpture and environmental concerns surrounding them. Artists concerned with environmental impact and the interconnection of art with other fields. The impact of material and technique upon form and content; understanding the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations. Group discussions, critiques, readings, video presentations, a field trip to a local artist-in-residence program, and visiting lecturers. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 153N: Ecology of Materials

This hands on studio based sculpture course takes a critical look at the materials used in sculpture and addresses the environmental concerns surrounding them. We will look at artists concerned with environmental impact and the interconnection of art to other fields. This class also addresses the impact of material and technique upon form and content; therefore understanding the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations will be addressed. Students will learn traditional building techniques as needed (wood shop, metal shop, mold making, found object) as well as anti-object techniques. Existing at the intersection of art, science, technology and ecology, environmental art often functions to inform and/or interpret natural conditions and the processes associated with both "non-human" and "human-made" constructions. It will also educate us about environmental issues and concerns. This course introduces and provides a context for this area of interdisciplinary exchange and artist production by examining areas commonly known as cradle to cradle design, land art, eco art, environmental art, and art and technology. What role does sculpture play in a fragile world with depleting natural resources, global economies and media dominance? What is the life cycle of object making and creating? What is our relationship to objects in a growing technological age? Students will make 3-4 projects based on these questions. Group discussions, critiques, readings, video presentations, a field trip to a local artist-in-residence program Recology at the San Francisco Dump, visiting artists and visiting faculty from Stanford doing environmental research will augment this class.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 155: Social Sculpture (TAPS 155)

This course investigates the immediacy of the body as material and sculpture in order to investigate private and social spaces. Actions are often used to understand or question the function and psychological aspects of a space and are documented for the perpetuation of these ideas. Throughout the quarter we will investigate the body as material and develop site specific performances enacted for: Private/Domestic and Public Space; Constructed Space & Physical Space; ecological systems; and generate both Individual & Collaborative based Actions, Interventions, & Events."
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yanez, V. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 156Q: Installation Art in Time and Space

This hands on studio based sculpture course focuses on developing concepts, and creating a site-specific installation art project. This class will addresses the impact of material and technique upon form and content; therefore understanding the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations will be addressed. Students will learn traditional building techniques as needed (wood shop, metal shop, mold making, found object) as well as anti-object techniques. Students will make 3-4 projects that will culminate in a final site-specific installation. We will look at contemporary artists working in the field of installation art. Group discussions, critiques, readings, video presentations, field trips and visiting artists will augment the class. Installation Art is based on the merger of Space and Time and on a relationship between the artist and the visitor. Utilizing your interests and abilities in a variety of subjects and media, you will create environments that immerse the viewer in a sensory/ intellectual/ emotional experience. The material and methods you use can range from everyday objects, to highly personalized forms, from appropriated sounds to surveillance video, from large wall drawings to interactive switches for the participant to manipulate. The class will consist of demonstrations of art skills particularly useful in installation (sculptural, video, audio, interactive media, etc), presentations by the professor, research and reports and journal entries, and weekly critique. Installation Art is a pervasive, varied, global practice for art-making that acts as a gathering place for expression in all media addressing all subjects in a wide range of styles by broad grouping of artists."
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 157: Art, Invention, Activism in the Public Sphere

How can art comment on and influence our understanding of the public spaces that we inhabit on a daily basis? This course will explore the many roles that art can play in social spaces as well as the history of art interventions in the public realm. Art can activate a wide variety of sites from the natural to the urban. Through site-specific sculpture and performance we will interact with the political, ecological and social aspects of public space in order to see these places and each other in a new light.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 158: Hybrid Sculpture

Study of concepts, aesthetics, procedures and practice of sculpting on the computer with 3D modeling tools for generation of form, environment and or character as related to your conceptual ideas. Relate traditional sculpture principles of form, material, site and utilize 3D modeling to virtually give rise to an installation or sculpture. Includes output to 2D and 3D rapid prototyping printers, laser cutters, and CNC router. Conceptual and technical skills, and safe and appropriate use of tools and materials. Impact of material and technique upon form and content; the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Historical and contemporary forming methods provide a theoretical basis for studio work. Field trips; guest lecturers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ulfeldt, A. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 160: Intro to Digital / Physical Design

Contemporary production processes ¿ both manufacturing and media processes often span the digital and the physical. 3D Depth cameras can scan real world models or movements, which can be manipulated or adjusted digitally, then re-output to the physical world via a myriad of 2D and 3D printing and laser cutting technologies. Crowd sourced information is uploaded to social media, which in turn guides our physical meeting places. Google street-view maps our physical world, and augmented reality displays overlay it. How as artists or designers to we grapple with and use this digital / physical permeability to create new experiences and meaning for our current time? This introductory studio course explores various tool sets as well as artists working across these genres. This course is a good baseline exploration for anyone interested in designing or making art with emerging contemporary tools.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Odell, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 162: Embodied Interfaces

Our computers, phones and devices ¿see¿ us predominately as fingers and single eyes staring at screens. What would happen if our technology acknowledged more of our rich physical presence and capabilities in its design? How have artists and designers used different sensing technologies to account for more of our embodied selves in their works? In this studio course we will explore various sensing technologies and design pieces that engage our whole selves. Interfaces explored will range from the practical to the poetic. Sensors may involve flex sensors, heat sensors, microphones and simple camera tracking technology. We will analyze different tools for their appropriateness for different tasks and extend them through our designs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Splan, L. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 163: Drawing with Code (ARTSINST 142)

This studio course will engage coding practices as drawing tools. What makes a good algorithmic composition? How do we craft rule-sets and parameters to shape an interesting work? What changes if we conceive of still outputs, ongoing processes, or interactive processes as the "finished" work? We will look at the history of algorithmic drawing, including analog precedents like Sol LeWitt and other conceptual artists, along with current pioneers like John Simon Jr., Casey Reas, and LIA. Outputs will involve prints as well as screen-based works. Some basic coding experience is helpful, but not required. Assignments are based on conceptual principals that students can engage with at different coding skill levels. This is a good way for non CS students to explore coding practices as well as for CS students to hone their skills. We will work primarily in the free Processing software for our explorations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Utterback, C. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 164: DESIGN IN PUBLIC SPACES

How does our design of public spaces and elements of our built environment influence and control people¿s movements and expressions in these spaces? Can re-designing a trashcan or a stairway change how people throw away their trash or use the stairs? What are the principles of democracy, surveillance, or personal expression at stake in our current shared spaces? How have artists and designers used their skills to question or re-direct people¿s behavior in these public spheres, or in other spheres of shared cultural heritage? Strategies include re-designing components of the built environment, but also other strategies of intervention, tactical media and reality hacking.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lynnerup, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 165: Social Media and Performative Practices

How can social media, mobile applications, or other more traditional media be used to engage people in new social situations? Could you design an app that gets people to talk with strangers (Miranda July), or a poster that causes a revolt in an office space (Packard Jennings), or a truck that changes how people think about nursing mothers (Jill Miller)? What about platforms that encourage political dialog or social changes? This studio course examines how contemporary artists and designers engage people in a process of social dialog, critique and political change through the existing media and non-traditional art practices.nnWith the constant development of new apps and social media platforms and the pressure from society of everyone having an online presence, the class will investigate and focus specifically on how these tools can be used as a resource to create and present artworks creatively. The students in this class will be introduced to a variety of artwork examples and study different artist¿s approach to media, technically as well as conceptually. Experimentation is highly emphasized throughout this course, as the goal is for the students to create and produce works that uses social media in new ways to tell stories, connect with, mystify or surprise the audience.nnA selection of software such as Photoshop, Premiere Pro, After Affects, and other tools will be introduced in class that will assist the students in producing work for the required assignments.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 166: Sculptural Screens / Malleable Media (ARTSTUDI 266)

In this upper level studio course, students will experiment with video and computational outputs embedded in physical scenarios. What new physical formats are made possible by contemporary screen and projection-mapping technologies? How can we make expressive use of LCD screens, pico projectors, i-pad arrays, and LEDs? The class will address the screen as sculptural medium by examining established artists like Nam June Paik, Michael Snow, Tony Oursler, and Pippilotti Rist, as well as exploring emerging contemporary artists tackling this medium. Prerequisites include one of the following: Intro to Digital/Physical Design, Embodied Interfaces, Media Archaeologies, Making it with Arduino, Digital Art 1, Electronic Art or permission of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Utterback, C. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 167: Introduction to Animation

Projects in animation techniques including flipbook, cutout/collage, stop-motion such as claymation, pixilation, and puppet animation, rotoscoping, and time-lapse. Films. Computers used as post-production tools, but course does not cover computer-generated animation. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 168: Data as Material

How can data be used as material in art and design projects. Beyond straight-forward ideas of data-visualization, this studio course seeks to investigate how we construct meaning from sets of information, and how the construction of those sets determines the meaning itself. This course also investigates different display aesthetics and how this is also a strategy for generating meaning. Artists studied include those who use various forms of personal, public, and social data as part of their practice. Historical examples from conceptual artists and other genres are considered along with contemporary artists working with data in digital or hybrid digital/physical formats.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 169: Virtual Reality: the possibility and peril of immersive artwork

How can we use virtual reality systems to create powerful, beautiful and socially engaged artworks? Is it possible to use technically sophisticated (and sometimes frustrating) tools to share our unique personal visions? What can working in virtual reality teach us about our embodied reality and sense of presence? How might we question the hype and techno-utopianism surrounding VR, by using the medium itself? What is left out of the current conversation around VR that you would like to explore?nnIn this introductory studio art course, students will learn to create artworks using virtual reality systems. We will use the HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, and Daydream VR headsets, as well as more accessible phone-based augmented reality systems to explore this medium. Through lectures and research presentations, we will familiarize ourselves with the artistic history of VR - from foundational works from the 1990¿s through current examples - in order to inform our own work. nnStudents will become familiar with the fundamental studio art practice of analyzing and critiquing their own and others¿ projects. Learning to analyze artwork in turn helps students create works with more emotional and conceptual impact. nnWhile there are no official prerequisites for this course, familiarity with any kind of scripting language or coding environment will be helpful as Unity will be used as the main authoring environment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Utterback, C. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 170: Photography I: Black and White

Through film and dark room instruction, students learn to use a SLR 35-mm camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed). They develop an awareness of light and its various properties and possibilities. Students become familiar with black and white darkroom techniques creating contact sheets and to evaluating prints, make corrections and re-print. They acquire essential knowledge of historical and contemporary black and white art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 170S: Introduction to Photo: Summer

Critical, theoretical, and practical aspects of creative photography through camera and lab techniques. Field work. Cantor Art Center and Art Gallery exhibitions. Course requires the use of a 35mm camera. The Department will supply if necessary. Summer. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 171: PHOTOGRAPHY I: DIGITAL

Through digital instruction, students learn to use a DSLR camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, color temp/white balance). They become familiar with basic scanning techniques (appropriated images, not negatives) on a flatbed scanner, and basic digital printing (in color). They learn basic file management as well as the use of Adobe Lightroom software. They are taught to operate 17¿-wide Epson digital printers, to print digital proof sheets, and to evaluate prints, correct files and re-print. Students acquire an essential knowledge of contemporary art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 171S: PHOTOGRAPHY I: DIGITAL

Through digital instruction, students learn to use a DSLR camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, color temp/white balance). They become familiar with basic scanning techniques (appropriated images, not negatives) on a flatbed scanner, and basic digital printing (in color). They learn basic file management as well as the use of Adobe Lightroom software. They are taught to operate 17"-wide Epson digital printers, to print digital proof sheets, and to evaluate prints, correct files and re-print. Students acquire an essential knowledge of contemporary art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 172: Art and Teratology

This studio course looks at the relationships between biology and art, particularly as they relate to the topic of ¿monsters.¿ Rather than addressing the ways in which art has assisted the biological sciences (as in medical illustration), we¿ll focus on the ways in which biology has influenced the art-making practice. Course material will address our changing conceptions of biology and the monstrous, and the ways in which artists engage these cultural shifts. Students are responsible for creating art works that address these themes and others that emerge from class discussions and presentations, in any medium of their choosing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wight, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 173E: Cell Phone Photography

The course combines the critical analysis of cell phone photography with the creation of photographic art works that explore this specific medium's experimental, social and documentary potential. The increasing ubiquity of cell phone photography has had a widespread impact on the practice of photography as an art form. We will consider and discuss the ways in which the platforms of cell phone photography (Instagram, Snapchat) are democratizing image-making and transforming notions of authorship and subjectivity to an unprecedented extent, but also how the use of new technological tools help expand notions of creativity and aesthetic standards.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Peck, S. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 173S: Cell Phone Photography

The course combines the critical analysis of cell phone photography with the creation of photographic art works that explore this specific medium's experimental, social and documentary potential. The increasing ubiquity of cell phone photography has had a widespread impact on the practice of photography as an art form. We will consider and discuss the ways in which the platforms of cell phone photography (Instagram, Snapchat) are democratizing image-making and transforming notions of authorship and subjectivity to an unprecedented extent, but also how the use of new technological tools help expand notions of creativity and aesthetic standards.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yanez, V. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 174B: Creativity in the Age of Facebook: Making Art for and from Networks

This class explores the history, practice and technique of creating art on and for the internet. Discussions, projects and readings focus on the ways in which internet art embodies changing ideas about artistic creation, technology, and interactivity as a way of blurring the line between artist and audience. Setting recent work against the backdrop of earlier moments in contemporary art (found object art, photomontage), this course also situates internet art in the pre-internet tradition of finding new perspectives on, and meanings in, overfamiliar or banal media surroundings. In collaborative and individual projects, students will create visual compositions on online platforms such as NewHive and explore social media interventions, Twitter experiments, crowdsourced work, collections of online found imagery, supercuts, GIFs, and "choose your own adventure"- style online storytelling.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Odell, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 175: Sound Installation (MUSIC 192F)

This class will cover creative, historical and theoretical aspects of sited artworks based in sound. We will create, install and critique new works that use sound with special attention the ways that sound intersects with time, space and architecture. Attention will be given both to sound as immaterial signal and to sound in its relation to visual environments and objects. The class is intended for artists, composers and others who want to explore the spatial, social and aesthetic dimensions of sound. Assigned readings will cover sound practices in the contexts of art, music, sound studies and anthropology. Experience in sound recording or production, signal processing and spatialization, or installation are valuable but not required. Curiosity and attention to sounds are.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; DeMarinis, P. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 176: Time Shifts

In this course, we examine how both individual perceptions and artistic representations of time have historically shifted with changes in technology. What are the current possibilities to extend/re-imagine how we represent time using digital tools? How do these possibilities, in turn, re-inform traditional media? This is a conceptual and experimental class with a studio focus. Examples are mainly from an art context, but include interaction design, information visualization, and scientific illustration of time-based events and processes. Students should have previous experience with a set of digital tools - Photoshop, FinalCutPro, AfterEffects, or a programming language that will allow you to digitally manipulate images. Assignments include exercises using traditional media, and digitally based projects. Occasional writing assignments also required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 177: Video Art I

Students create experimental video works. Conceptual, formal, and performance-based approaches to the medium. The history of video art since the 70s and its influences including experimental film, television, minimalism, conceptual art, and performance and electronic art. Topics: camera technique, lighting, sound design, found footage, cinematic conventions, and nonlinear digital editing. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jackson, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 178: Art and Electronics

Analog electronics and their use in art. Basic circuits for creating mobile, illuminated, and responsive works of art. Topics: soldering; construction of basic circuits; elementary electronics theory; and contemporary electronic art. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ulfeldt, A. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 179: Digital Art I

Contemporary electronic art focusing on digital media. Students create works exploring two- and three-dimensional, and time-based uses of the computer in fine art. History and theoretical underpinnings. Common discourse and informative resources for material and inspiration. Topics: imaging and sound software, web art, and rethinking the comptuer as interface and object. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Odell, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 180: Color (TAPS 180P)

Hands-on study of color to develop color sensitivity and the ability to manipulate color to exploit its expressive potential. Guided experimentation and observation. Topics include color relativity, color and light, color mixing, color harmony, and color and content. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 181: From Dissection to Monster

The focus of this class is to create an artwork that explores the relationship between creators and the `monsters¿ they create. The course explores the role of the artist as an innovator, experimenter, inventor, entrepreneur, and creative researcher. Students will perform a robust dissection and mapping of a modern technology and then emerge an artwork incorporating the constituent parts and informed by the dissection. n nAlmost anything that we create can become monstrous. One hopes for the best, but never knows just how it might play out. The story of humankind is partially a history of the twists and turns posited by technological innovation. The complex relationship between intention and context sometimes converge in mysterious and unpredictable ways resulting inn corruption in creative strategies, machines, architecture, designs and creative expression. n nThee class is inspired by the classic Gothic literature, Frankenstein, by Marry Shelly., a tragic story about Victor Frankenstein¿s failure to accept responsibility for the consequences of bringing new life into the world.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 182B: Conceptual Art

Through experience-based exercises this class will build upon students understanding of conceptual art. Student will be guided in the exploration of their ideas beginning with the parameters set by the camera and later by specific place(s) and space(s) in and around campus. Throughout the quarter students will learn to process and poetically interpret their ideas as well time, space, the self and current sociopolitical issues in a manner that best suites each idea. In class activities will address curiosities to invoke a deeper investigation of each student's relationship to art and/or their individual field of study. This seminar will include a survey of art historical examples to help stimulate ideas, discussions and activities. Visiting artists as well as off-campus studio visits will further inform the course.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 183: Sports in Contemporary Art

Sport and Art are generally viewed as the polar opposites. You are either interested in art or sport. You can't be both.nThis course examines and questions this generalization and begins with a historical overview of artworks and artists, who uses sport, physical activity, and games as inspiration in their work.nWhether in the form of figurative representations of athletes, to inventing new games, and experiments in order to create artworks that comments on issues as broad as identity, race, gender as well as provoke audience participation through interactive installations and other playful strategies.nBesides from the historical overview and examples presented in the class, the students will be given 4 different assignments, which will allow the students to explore the concept of art in sport and vice versa and produce their own projects in response. The course is interdisciplinary in its form, but students will be introduced to a variety of disciplines and media such as Digital Video and Photography, Performance, Sculpture, and Installation Art.nOne of the goals of this course is to demonstrate the many commonalities between art and sport and to encourage a dialogue about this topic as well as bring the two seemingly divergents more together.nSome artist that will be discussed are:nDavid Hammons, Collier Schorr, Paul Pfeiffer, Anne Imhof, Camille Henrot, Gabriel Orozco, Allora & Calzadilla, Chi Kai-Yuan, Hank Willis Thomas, Ana Soler, Jørgen Leth, Cassils and Lee Walton to mention a few.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lynnerup, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 184: Art and Environmental Engagement

The aim of this course is to use the tools of art as a means to actively engage with the natural world. Students will be required to go beyond surface representations and dig deep with their work to uncover conceptual, ecological and historical meaning. Whether the focus is on a plant, animal, mineral, or an ecological system, students will be encouraged to investigate and interact with their subjects. Scientists who experiment in the field will be brought in to discuss their research and working processes. Collaborations are welcome. We will examine the work by artists, from past to present, who address the environment in a critical way. Students will work on creative projects with the goal to open new avenues of dialogue between culture and nature.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 230: Interdisciplinary Art Survey

This course is designed to develop diversity of concepts and strategies within the student's artistic practice. The course includes a survey of artists using different media taught in the department's studio program such as painting, drawing, video and digital art, printmaking, photography, and sculpture. This seminar-style class seeks to expand the artistic practice outside of traditional media boundaries and focuses on the translation of concepts across various media. Art Practice majors and minors only. (upper level)
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 231A: Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino (ARTSTUDI 130)

Students use electronics and software to create kinetic and interactive elements in artwork. No prior knowledge of electronics or software is required. Students learn to program the Arduino, a small easy-to-use microprocessor control unit ( see http://www.arduino.cc/ ). Learn to connect various sensors such as light, motion, sound and touch and use them to control software. Learn to interface actuators like motors, lights and solenoids to create movement. Learn to connect the Arduino to theMAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment to create media-intensive video and audio environments. Explore the social dimensions of electronic art. (lower level)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; DeMarinis, P. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 233: Let's Make a Monster: Critical Making (FILMSTUD 233, FILMSTUD 433)

Ever since Frankenstein unleashed his monster onto the world in Mary Shelley¿s novel from 1818, the notion of ¿technology-out-of-control¿ has been a constant worry of modern societies, plaguing more optimistic visions of progress and innovation with fears that modern machines harbor potentials that, once set in motion, can no longer be tamed by their human makers. In this characteristically modern myth, the act of making ¿ and especially technological making ¿ gives rise to monsters. As a cautionary tale, we are therefore entreated to look before we leap, to go slow and think critically about the possible consequences of invention before we attempt to make something radically new. However, this means of approaching the issue of human-technological relations implies a fundamental opposition between thinking and making, suggesting a split between cognition as the specifically human capacity for reflection versus a causal determinism-without-reflection that characterizes the machinic or the technical. Nevertheless, recent media theory questions this dichotomy by asserting that technologies are inseparable from humans¿ abilities to think and to act in the world, while artistic practices undo the thinking/making split more directly and materially, by taking materials ¿ including technologies ¿ as the very medium of their critical engagement with the world. Drawing on impulses from both media theory and art practice, ¿critical making¿ names a counterpart to ¿critical thinking¿ ¿ one that utilizes technologies to think about humans¿ constitutive entanglements with technology, while recognizing that insight often comes from errors, glitches, malfunctions, or even monsters. Co-taught by a practicing artist and a media theorist, this course will engage students in hands-on critical practices involving both theories and technologies. Let¿s make a monster!
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 236: Future Media, Media Archaeologies (MUSIC 236)

Hand-on. Media technologies from origins to the recent past. Students create artworks based on Victorian era discoveries and inventions, early developments in electronic media, and orphaned technologies. Research, rediscover, invent, and create devices of wonder and impossible objects. Readings in history and theory. How and what media technologies mediate.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; DeMarinis, P. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 239: Intermedia Workshop (MUSIC 155, MUSIC 255)

Students develop and produce intermedia works. Musical and visual approaches to the conceptualisation and shaping of time-based art. Exploration of sound and image relationship. Study of a wide spectrum of audiovisual practices including experimental animation, video art, dance, performance, non-narrative forms, interactive art and installation art. Focus on works that use music/sound and image as equal partners. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: consent of instructors, and one of FILMPROD 114, ARTSTUDI 131, 138, 167, 177, 179, or MUSIC 123, or equivalent. May be repeated for credit
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 240: Drawing II

Intermediate/advanced. Observation, invention, and construction. Development of conceptual and material strategies, with attention to process and purpose. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 140 or consent of instructor. (upper level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 243: Anatomy for Artists (SURG 243)

Lectures highlight the intersections and influences between human anatomy and art. Studio sessions provide an opportunity for students to immerse in anatomically inspired studio projects. Drawing, mixed media, and some painting mediums will be used during the studio sessions. Plastic models, dry bones, cadaveric specimens, and live models will be used for the studio sessions. Class time includes art instruction, creation and feedback. May be repeated for credit. Honing individual style is encouraged; both beginning and advanced students are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ARTSTUDI 244: Advance Figure Drawing

Figurative depiction is explored across a wide range of media and techniques. Throughout the quarter, artist and figure are explored as subject/object, metaphor, player, and director. Beginning with traditional approaches across various media (graphite and charcoal, ink/brush, soft and oil pastels, mixed media), we move into various methods of distortion. Using both live models and our own bodies, performance and depictive strategies are employed to create work which examines identity and power relationships. In the final two weeks, we have two live models working together. Work will excise/reassemble found and staged images, juxtaposing figures, creating tension and implied narratives in space. Four outside projects push skills and concept, amplifying each artist¿s hand and voice.nnPrerequisite: Drawing 1 or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Deas, Y. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 245: Painting II

Symbolic, narrative, and representational self-portraits. Introduction to the pictorial strategies, painting methods, and psychological imperatives of Dürer, Rembrandt, Cézanne, Kahlo, Beckmann, Schiele, and Munch. Students paint from life, memory, reproductions, and objects of personal significance to create a world in which they describe themselves. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 140, 145, or consent of instructor. (upper level)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chagoya, E. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 246: Individual Work: Drawing and Painting

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory studio course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. $100 Lab Fee. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chagoya, E. (PI); Xie, X. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 247: Collage

Collage has influenced painting and drawing practices, as well as film and photography through juxtaposition, scale shifts, and reappropriation of the found image. Although many iconic works in this medium date to the 20th century, this course focuses on collage as a vibrant, contemporary form. nnLectures on artists using collage with new vigor. Studio component focused on experimentation and exploration. Student work is encouraged to speak to personal, aesthetic, or political concerns, using findings from magazines, advertisements, internet, and other sources. Working with Photoshop, scans and with print, we will use collage elements to create new and stunning compositions of contemporary life.nnPrerequisites: 140, 145, or consent of instructor. (upper level). May be repeated for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Howe, S. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 249: Advanced Undergraduate Seminar

Capstone experience for majors in Art Practice. Interdisciplinary. Methods of research, cross-media critiques, and strategies for staging and presenting work, including a group exhibition for Commencement. Guest artists from the Bay Area. Course for Art Practice majors only. Art Practice minors may interview for possible inclusion. (upper level)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chen, K. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 250: Individual Work: Sculpture

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory studio course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. $100 Lab Fee. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berlier, T. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 252: Sculpture II

Builds upon 151. Installation and non-studio pieces. Impact of material and technique upon form and content; the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Historical and contemporary forming methods provide a theoretical basis for the studio work. Field trips; guest lecturers. (upper level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 253: ECOLOGY OF MATERIALS

Advanced studio-based sculpture course. Artists concerned with environmental impact and the interconnection of art with other fields. Students will take a critical look at the materials used in sculpture, in relation to environmental concerns, and the impact of material and technique upon form and content; therefore understanding the physical, expressive and environmental possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations. Group discussions, critiques, readings, video presentations, a field trip to a local artist-in-residence program, and visiting lecturers.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 254: Kinetic Sculpture

This course is focused on developing a practical, hands on understanding of kinetic mechanisms applied to objects and materials in sculpture and installation. Class time will take the form of lectures and technical demos, and hands-on labs where you will be exposed to different strategies for making movement in the physical world. Topics investigated include Rube Goldberg machines, devices of wonder, interactivity, audience experience and participation. This course will not be co-taught this year.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ulfeldt, A. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 255: Sonic Crossroads

Through the history of music, sound art, acoustic ecology, literature, film, visual arts and performance, this course will examine the territory where sound meets space, sight, symbol, ritual, activism, self consciousness and language. Students will engage in conversations, experiments and exercises that will enhance their awareness of the sonic phenomena and the ¿time canvas¿ as a space of creation and communication.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 256V: Vital Signs: Performance in the 21st Century (TAPS 156V, TAPS 256V)

The first decade and a half of the 21st century have been transformative for performance art. On the one hand, it brought an unprecedented cultural acceptance of this art form, which is now featured in most prestigious museums and art festivals; on the other, the most recent generation of performance artists is showing a great awareness of the historicity and complexity of this form. In this class, we will try to recognize and investigate these and other prominent features of performance art produced since the turn of the millennium. We will use as our primary case studies performances that will be featured in the series Vital Signs: Contemporary Performance Art Series, hosted by TAPS in 2017-2018. The primary objective of the series is to highlight and showcase underrepresented performance forms such as experimental performance art, durational art, and body art, among others, by artists from communities that remain invisible or underrepresented in mainstream performing arts. The series is curated by the Los Angeles-based artist Cassils, who has been listed by the Huffington Post as 'one of ten transgender artists who are changing the landscape of contemporary art' and has achieved international recognition for a rigorous engagement with the body as a form of social sculpture. Cassils's curatorial vision is to present established performance artists alongside emerging artists. Each quarter, a pair of artists will visit Stanford for two days (Thursday-Friday). On day one of their visit they will offer a workshop or a public performance, and on the second day they will engage in a public dialogue. The class will meet each quarter for three weeks: before, during, and after the artists' visit. This way, the students will have an opportunity to prepare for the visit, engage with the visiting artists, and reflect on their work. They will receive their grades upon completion of the class, in the spring of 2018.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 261: Individual Work: Emerging Practices in Design & Technology

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory studio course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. $100 Lab Fee. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 263: Paper

Beyond conventional use of paper as a foundation for mark-making to its potential as a medium in its own right. Students experiment with papers to develop facility with techniques of folding, scoring, curling, cutting, tearing, piercing, embossing, layering, and binding to create three-dimensional forms, patterned/textured surfaces, reliefs, interactive dynamic structures such as pop-ups, containers, and book forms. (upper level). May be repeated for credit
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 264: Advanced Interaction Design

This upper level studio course will continue and create a sustained investigation into designed interactivity in real space. Students will create interactive installations, or public interventions using sensors or other computational devices. Prerequisites include one of the following - Embodied Interfaces, Media Archaeologies, Making it with Arduino, Digital Art 1, Electronic Art or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ganucheau, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 266: Sculptural Screens / Malleable Media (ARTSTUDI 166)

In this upper level studio course, students will experiment with video and computational outputs embedded in physical scenarios. What new physical formats are made possible by contemporary screen and projection-mapping technologies? How can we make expressive use of LCD screens, pico projectors, i-pad arrays, and LEDs? The class will address the screen as sculptural medium by examining established artists like Nam June Paik, Michael Snow, Tony Oursler, and Pippilotti Rist, as well as exploring emerging contemporary artists tackling this medium. Prerequisites include one of the following: Intro to Digital/Physical Design, Embodied Interfaces, Media Archaeologies, Making it with Arduino, Digital Art 1, Electronic Art or permission of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Utterback, C. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 267: Emerging Technology Studio

This course is an upper level studio course featuring different invited guest artists each year. Advanced subject material will be based on instructors¿ skills. Prerequisites will be based on the specific topic, but might include one of the following ¿ Intro to Digital/Physical Design, Embodied Interfaces, Media Archaeologies, Making it with Arduino, Digital Art 1, Electronic Art or permission of instructor.n nFor spring 2019, Emerging Technology Studio will be taught by Jesse Fleming (www.jessefleming.com) Jesse is an artist and filmmaker innovating at the convergence of media art and mindfulness. In his course, he will work with students to develop artworks using VR technologies. The goal will be to create VR experiences which allow people to explore their world, perception, consciousness and relation to others with the potential outcome of lowering the perceived boundary between self and other.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fleming, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 270: Advanced Photography Seminar

Students engage in professional photographic (studio) practices that prepare them to apply and extend the skills, methods and techniques they have learned in previous courses, including digital and analog shooting with digital print production. n nThese practices involve working collaboratively, taking on short-term projects, handling an increased media work flow, actively participating in regular critiques, and contributing to and showing work in a small final exhibition. Students refine their aesthetic, tap the interdisciplinary network of influences they have built, and work independently to become adept at presenting their ideas and building a portfolio to show the art they have produced to potential clients in a 'real world' professional context. n nAnyone interested in taking this class should apply with a project in mind that they aim to develop over the length of the course. Since these projects will require a considerable amount of independent work outside class time, students should submit a 1-to-2-page description outlining what they want to focus on and a portfolio featuring some images of work they have already created in that realm. Upon careful evaluation, students with the strongest proposals will be selected.n nThis course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ARTSTUDI 275, ARTSTUDI 278, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Calm, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 270A: CREATING EXPERIMENTAL CINEMA

This course is dedicated to creating at the crossroads of art and cinema. This experimental video art course will address practical filmmaking, taking as its baseline assumption the notion that experimentation is crucial to overcoming encrusted social, aesthetic, intellectual, and ideological norms. Over the course of the quarter, students will build familiarity with the the myriad components of cinematic creation, including directing, editing, camera operation, lighting, sound design, After Effects and color grading. They¿ll create cinematic video informed by viewing and discussion of key works from the history of experimental cinema.No prerequisite required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jackson, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 271: The View Camera

Students will learn how to use large-format 4x5 view cameras, and explore the ways in which large-format photography enables the creation of exceptionally clear images on a par with digital imaging. They will develop sheet film and print black-and-white images in analog format. To connect the camera to contemporary digital practices students will learn to scan and digitally print from their negatives. Specific attention will be given to mastering perspective control and in-camera manipulation of the image. From a historical point of view, the course will analyze and discuss images created with view cameras by a wide range of artists from the early days of photography to the present. Students will put their skills into practice and pursue their own aesthetic by producing a portfolio of images. Prerequisite: ARTSTUDI 170, ARTSTUDI 171, or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 272: Individual Work: Photography

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory studio course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. $100 Lab Fee. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Calm, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 273: Individual Work: Experimental Media

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory studio course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. $100 Lab Fee. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 274: Alternative Processes

Priority to advanced students. Technical procedures and the uses of primitive and hand-made photographic emulsions. Enrollment limited to 10. Prerequisites: 170, 270, or consent of instructor. (upper level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 275: PHOTOGRAPHY II: Digital

Students continue to use DLSR cameras, with an ongoing emphasis on operating manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, color temp/ white balance). They are taught intermediate-level digital printing (in color) using large-format printers. They continue to work with Lightroom as a file management system and are introduced to Photoshop. Students gain a deeper insight into and stronger grasp of practices in contemporary digital photography, with a continuing focus on the importance of photo editing/selection and sequencing, as well as questions around the conceptual and practical implications and limits of photographic images. Prerequisite: ARTSTUDI 171 or equivalent. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hellu, J. (PI); Peck, S. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 276: The Photographic Book

This course explores the historical development and artistic potential of photography books. Students will learn about book structures, signatures, binding styles, printing methods and publication platforms (from conventional print to web-based). They will focus on how to group and sequence photographic images to produce a coherent, thematically organized body of work, and examine the creative possibilities of integrating image and text. Students will have access to numerous campus resources to do research and develop ideas, including the extensive photo book collections of the Bowes Art & Architecture Library and the Cantor Museum. They will have to execute a photographic project of their own design and produce a hand-made book. Prerequisite: ARTSTUDI 170, ARTSTUDI 171, or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 277: Project class: Digital and Analogue Projects in Photography

Students pursue a topic of their own definition. Further exploration of darkroom and other printing techniques; contemporary theory and criticism. (lower level). May be repeated for credit 2 times for a maximum of 8 units.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 277A: Video Art II

Video, criticism, and contemporary media theory investigating the time image. Students create experimental video works, addressing the integration of video with traditional art media such as sculpture and painting. Non-linearity made possible by Internet and DVD-based video. No prerequisite required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 278: Photography II: Black and White

Students are introduced to and provided with medium-format film cameras, which they learn to use with an ongoing emphasis on operating manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed). Students are introduced to metering for film using hand-held light meters in a further study of light. They hone their printing skills and learn finer printing techniques using fiber-based paper. They also explore the full range of black and film stocks and get to experiment with alternative techniques like pinhole photography, photograms and Holga cameras. Students gain a deeper insight into and stronger grasp of practices in contemporary black and white photography, with a continuing focus on the importance of photo editing/selection and sequencing, as well as questions around the conceptual and practical implications and limits of photographic images. Prerequisite: ARTSTUDI 170 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Calm, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 279A: Digital Art II

Advanced. Interactive art works using multimedia scripting software. Experimental interfaces, computer installation work, and mobile technologies. Contemporary media art theory and practice. (upper level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 284: Art and Biology

The relationship between biology and art. Rather than how art has assisted the biological sciences as in medical illustration, focus is on how biology has influenced art making practice. New technologies and experimental directions, historical shifts in artists' relationship to the living world, the effects of research methods on the development of theory, and changing conceptions of biology and life. Projects address these themes and others that emerge from class discussions and presentations. (upper level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 285: Topics in Media Studies: Street Media

Literal and figurative meanings of street and how they provide potential to media technologies and invite innovative forms of artistic practice. Contemporary art as the juncture where street movements and new media collide. Small projects. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 286: Portrait Photography

This course will trace the history and explore the contemporary practice of portrait photography. At a time when pictures are being produced and disseminated in unprecedented proliferation, and the 'selfie' has become a key part of popular photographic discourse, we will look at the complexities of portraiture in terms of skill sets and processes, aesthetics and styles, ideology and identity. The course will examine portraiture in relation to representations of race, gender, class, and sexuality, engaging with such dualities as private/public, professional/amateur, traditional/innovative in the pursuit of capturing the self through the looking glass, beyond pose and persona. Using their own cameras, students will develop individual photographic projects based on digital or analog shooting with digital print production.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hellu, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 288: Documentary Photography

The documentary image has constituted a keystone of photographic practice since the earliest days of the medium's history. In this class, we will examine the relevance and validity of this mode of expression and communication in contemporary photography. We will look at the rich history of documentary photography and examine the impetus behind the historical efforts that shaped its tradition. We will also discuss the differences between documentary photography and photojournalism as well as explore the distinction between photography as a personal document and as an examination of an external idea or issue. Prerequisite: ARTSTUDI 170, ARTSTUDI 171, or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 290: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wight, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 295: Visual Arts Internship

Professional experience in a field related to the Visual Arts for six to ten weeks. Internships may include work for galleries, museums, art centers, and art publications. Students arrange the internship, provide a confirmation letter from the hosting institution, and must receive consent from the faculty coordinator to enroll in units. To supplement the internship students maintain a journal. Evaluations from the student and the supervisor, together with the journal, are submitted at the end of the internship. Restricted to declared majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Calm, J. (PI); Wight, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 297: Honors Thesis Exhibition

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 310A: Directed Reading: Studio

Terms: Aut | Units: 1-15 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 310B: Directed Reading: Studio

Terms: Win | Units: 1-15 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 310C: Directed Reading: Studio

Terms: Spr | Units: 1-15 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 342: MFA Project: Tutorial

Students construct an individual tutorial with an instructor selected from the studio art faculty, including visiting artists. The student must take tutorials with at least three different faculty members during the six-quarter program. Prior approval of advisor is required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 342A: MFA: Object Seminar

Weekly seminars, studio practice, and individual tutorials. Student work is critiqued on issues of identity, presentation, and the development of coherent critical language. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to M.F.A. studio students only.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Calm, J. (PI); Xie, X. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 342B: MFA: Concept Seminar

Weekly seminars, studio practice, and individual tutorials. Modes of conceptualization to broaden the base of cognitive and generative processes. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to M.F.A. studio students only.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 342C: M.F.A Seminar

Professional practices; preparation of documentation; exhibition and presentation. Restricted to M.F.A. studio students only. May be repeat for credit total units allowed 45 and total completion 6
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Utterback, C. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 350A: Art & Design I: History and Theory

This two part graduate level course is required for all first year JPD students (both MFA and ME students), and open to all MFA Art Practice students. The first quarter of the course is a seminar, which focuses on the history of design practices and theories in a broad range of fields including design, art, and architecture. We will examine how well known concepts such as "The Bauhaus", "the designer", "Design Thinking", and metaphors such as "workshop", "school", "laboratory", "studio", or "post-studio" arise, and how they shape the artist or designer's work in a particular cultural context. Through reading, writing, and discussion, students will attempt to define their current position within a historical context and chart their future vision. The course may involve guest lectures and visits to various collections and archives.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 350B: Art & Design II: Personal Practice

This two part graduate level course is required for all first year JPD students (both MFA and ME students), and open to all MFA Art Practice students. The second quarter of the course is a studio class, which examines our personal relationships to various creative processes (technical, procedural, and conceptual). Our goal is to gain new insights into our creative processes and find new possibilities within our available working methods. We will investigate issues such as constraint, iteration, collaboration, delegation, daily practice, and tools. Assignments such as "handmade-readymade-fablab" will challenge students to work with various processes and conceptual frameworks within single projects. The course will include four major projects, many minor studio exercises, readings, and discussion.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 360A: Design Masters Project I

This two part graduate level seminar and studio course is required for second year JPD MFA students, and open to second year JPD ME students and all MFA art practice students. The first quarter of this course examines artists as contextually engaged problem solvers and provocateurs. What strategies have artists used to draw attention to, and drive change regarding issues they care about? How is art used to change habits, shift the directions of cultural discussions, and make the invisible visible? We will study artists and designers who use innovative techniques to these ends such as Merle Ukeles, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Eduardo Kac, Jon Rubin, Amy Franceschini, Alfredo Jaar, Stamen Design (cab spotting), and Rebar. In addition to readings and discussions, students will create and critique a series of four studio projects that engage participants to rethink a specific site or situation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 360B: Design Masters Project II

This two part graduate level seminar and studio course is required for second year JPD MFA students, and open to second year JPD ME students and all MFA art practice students. In this second quarter of the course, students will refine and expand one of their assignments from Sites/Situations I to create a completed site-specific installation, intervention, or product/object, which provokes discussion or change in our community. Works will be realized at various sites around campus, or in the community at large. Issues such as budget, public safety and code will be addressed. Time will be allotted for documentation, critique, and assessment of these projects.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 360C: Master's Project: Design

Students enroll concurrently in ME 316. Over the course of the year, students create and present two master's theses involving the synthesis of aesthetics and technological concerns in the service of human need and possibility.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 361: MFA First Year Seminar: Context

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Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-15 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 390: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wight, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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