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ARTHIST 1B: How to Look at Art and Why: An Introduction to the History of Western Painting

This course explores the relation of art to life¿how and why works of art, even from hundreds of years ago, matter in a person¿s life. It trains students to find the words to share their thoughts about art with their peers, friends, and family. Some fundamental questions the course considers: How do we get beyond the idea that the study and making of art are elite, ¿privileged¿ activities apart from the real world? How do we develop a sense of discernment¿of deciding for ourselves which artists matter, and which don¿t¿without being a snob? How can works of art teach us to feel the wonder of being alive and our deep debt to the past, to the dead? Focusing on painters such as Michelangelo, Rembrandt, Goya, Manet, Morisot, and Charlotte Salomon, this course will pursue these questions with the aim of challenging and encouraging students to develop their own ways of thinking and feeling¿generously and ethically¿about the past and the present. Sections will focus on original works of art at the Cantor Arts Center. No prerequisites required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nemerov, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 101: Introduction to Greek Art I: The Archaic Period (CLASSICS 161)

This lecture course explores Greek art and culture from 1000-480. In the beginning archaic art forms are more abstract than life-like, closer to Calder than Michelangelo. While Homer describes the rippling muscles (and egos) of his heroes, vase-painters and sculptors prefer abstraction. This changes in the 7th C. as a result of commerce with the Near East and Egypt. Imported Near Eastern bronzes and ivories awaken the Greeks to a wider range of subjects, techniques and ambitions. Later in the century, Greeks in Egypt learn to carve hard stone from Egyptian masters. Throughout the 6th C. Greek artists assimilate what they had borrowed, compete with one another, defy their teachers, test the tolerance of the gods and eventually produce works of art that speak with a Greek accent. When the Persians invade the Acropolis in 480, they find artifacts with little trace of alien influence or imprint - omens of the defiant Greek military that would prevail at Salamis and Plataea.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 115: The Italian Renaissance, or the Art of Success (ARTHIST 315)

How come that, even if you have never set foot in Italy, you have heard of Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael? What made them so incredibly famous, back then as well as today? This course examines the shooting of those, and other, artists to fame. It provides in-depth analyses of their innovative drawing practices and the making of masterpieces, taking you through a virtual journey across some of the greatest European and American collections. At the same time, this course also offers a study of the mechanics of success, how opportunities are created and reputations managed, and what role art plays in the construction of class and in today's national politics."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lugli, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 120: Superhero Theory (AMSTUD 120B, ARTHIST 320, FILMSTUD 120, FILMSTUD 320)

With their fantastic powers, mutable bodies, multiple identities, complicated histories, and visual dynamism, the American superhero has been a rich vehicle for fantasies (and anxieties) for 80+ years across multiple media, including comics, film, animation, TV, games, toys, and apparel. This course will center upon the body of the superhero, as it incarnates allegories of race, queerness, hybridity, sexuality, gendered stereotypes/fluidity, politics, vigilantism, masculinity, and monstrosity. They also embody a technological history that encompasses industrial, atomic, electronic, bio-genetic, and the digital.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bukatman, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 143A: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 343A, CEE 32R)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beischer, T. (PI)

ARTHIST 163: Queer America (AMSTUD 163, FEMGEN 163)

This class explores queer art, photography and politics in the United States since 1930. Our approach will be grounded in close attention to the history and visual representation of sexual minorities in particular historical moments and social contexts. We will consider the cultural and political effects of World War II, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, psychedelics, hippie culture and sexual liberation, lesbian separatism, the AIDS crisis, and marriage equality.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 186: Theme and Style in Japanese Art (ARTHIST 386, JAPAN 186, JAPAN 286)

A mixture of lecture and discussion, this course presents a chronological introduction to some of the defining monuments in the history of Japanese visual culture from prehistory to the mid-19th century. This introductory class presumes no prior knowledge of art history or of Japan. We will emphasize certain overarching themes like religious life; notions of decorum appropriate to various classes (court, warrior, and commoner); the relationship between and among the arts, such as the visual and the verbal, or the symphonic assemblage arts as seen in the tea ceremony; pervasive cultural tropes like nostalgia, seasonality, or the sense of place; and broader issues such as censorship, patronage, gender issues, and the encounters between Japanese and foreign cultures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Takeuchi, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 186B: Asian American Art: 1850-Present (AMSTUD 186D, ASNAMST 186B)

What does it mean, and what has it meant historically, to be "Asian American" in the United States? This lecture course explores this question through the example of artists, craftspeople, and laborers of Asian descent. We will consider their work alongside the art, visual culture, and literature of the United States. Key themes will include the history of immigration law; questions of home and belonging; art, activism, and community; interethnic solidarity; and gender and queerness. Artists and authors will include Isamu Noguchi, Grace Lee Boggs, Nam June Paik, Yoko Ono, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Grace Lee Boggs, Zarina, Carlos Villa, Takashi Murakami, Anne Cheng, Lisa Lowe, among many others. In addition to learning the history of Asian Americans and reading key texts in Asian American studies, this course will also teach the foundational skills of close looking and primary source research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 191: African American Art (AFRICAAM 191B)

This course surveys artworks made by African Americans in the United States and abroad. Students will explore major art movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement, and will study the impact of political movements on artists and their work, including the Black Liberation Movement and #BlackLivesMatter. In addition, students will consider how artists have contended with issues of race, gender, and sexuality and will examine transnational artist networks in Latin America and Europe among other places.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Salseda, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 203: Artists, Athletes, Courtesans and Crooks (CLASSICS 163)

The seminar covers a range of topics devoted to the makers of Greek art and artifacts, the ancient Greeks who used them in life and the afterlife, and the miscreants - from Lord Elgin to contemporary tomb-looters and dealers- whose deeds have damaged, deracinated and desecrated temples, sculptures and grave goods. Readings include ancient texts in translation, books and articles by eloquent experts, legal texts and lively page-turners. Classes meet in the seminar room and the Cantor Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 207: The Resurrected Body: Animacy in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 407)

This course explores the relationship of spirit and matter in medieval art and architecture, more specifically how the changing appearance of objects and spaces evokes the presence of the metaphysical as glitter, reverberation, and shadow. We will engage objects and monuments across the Mediterranean, studying the way they were staged in order to produce the perception of liveliness. The phenomenology of liveliness will be tied to the development of the theology of resurrection of the body.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pentcheva, B. (PI)

ARTHIST 224: Architecture as Performance from Antiquity to the Enlightenment (ARTHIST 424)

This seminar examines the nature of architectural representation in the western tradition, from antiquity until the 18th century. It considers the ancient theatre as an icon of representation and the afterlife of the stage building as a model for western architecture, including ephemera. It concludes a distinction between the theatrical and the more recent concept of the theatrical.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Barry, F. (PI)

ARTHIST 240: Millennium Approaches: The Art of the 1990s (ARTHIST 440)

This seminar will examine the art historical legacy of the 1990s, the decade of Bill Clinton, Beavis and Butthead, and Y2K. By placing art in conversation with music, popular culture, and political events, we will explore the dark underbelly of the decade's facade of sunny optimism. Key topics will include the the end of the Cold War, multiculturalism, American interventionism, the AIDS crisis, and early internet culture. Artists covered will include Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Kim Gordon, Mike Kelly, the Young British Artists, Gregg Bordowitz, Lorna Simpson, Zoe Leonard, Byron Kim, and Glenn Ligon. What is the relationship between art, popular culture, and history? How did the 1990s help shape our current culture?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 245: Art, Business & the Law

This course examines the intersection of art, business, and the law from a number of different angles, focusing on issues that impact our understanding of works of art and their circulation in the modern and contemporary periods. Topics range from individual case studies (e.g., the Elgin Marbles; Richard Serra) to the nature of the art market, and include cultural heritage issues, problems of censorship, and conceptions of authorship and intellectual property.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 264B: Starstuff: Space and the American Imagination (AMSTUD 143X, FILMSTUD 264B)

Course on the history of twentieth and twenty-first century American images of space and how they shape conceptions of the universe. Covers representations made by scientists and artists, as well as scientific fiction films, TV, and other forms of popular visual culture. Topics will include the importance of aesthetics to understandings of the cosmos; the influence of media and technology on representations; the social, political, and historical context of the images; and the ways representations of space influence notions of American national identity and of cosmic citizenship.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kessler, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 283E: Visuality, Memory and Citizenship: Archive and Activism in Catalan Photography (ILAC 283E)

An examination of the ethics, poetics and politics of visual representation in a selection of photographers and artists from Catalonia: images of the Spanish Civil War by Agustí Centelles, snapshots of urban life by Joan Colom, the use of photography as memorial or critical tool by Francesc Torres and Joan Fontcuberta¿s creative and theoretical contributions to post-photography in the digital age, among others. The wide range of practices discussed encompass documentary photography, photojournalism and the relation between photography and contemporary art. These Catalan photographers and artists will be studied in an international context, in connection with the work of Robert Capa, Gerda Taro, Gilles Peress, Gervasio Sánchez, Susan Meiselas, Marcelo Brodsky, Sophie Ristelhueber, Alfredo Jaar, Gustavo Germano and Martin Parr. The main focus will be on how photography serves both as a repository of memory and as an instrument of political intervention. Offered in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Monegal Brancos, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 290: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 295: Visual Arts Internship

Professional experience in a field related to the Visual Arts for six to ten weeks. Internships may include work for galleries, museums, art centers, and art publications. Students arrange the internship, provide a confirmation letter from the hosting institution, and must receive consent from the faculty coordinator to enroll in units. To supplement the internship students maintain a journal. Evaluations from the student and the supervisor, together with the journal, are submitted at the end of the internship. Restricted to declared majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 296: Junior Seminar: Methods & Historiography of Art History

Historiography and methodology. Through a series of case studies, this course introduces a range of influential critical perspectives in art history as a discipline and a practice. The goal is to stimulate thinking about what it means to explore the history of art today, to expose and examine our assumptions, expectations and predilections as we undertake to learn and write about works of art, their meanings and their status in the world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 297: Honors Thesis Writing

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 298: Individual Work: Art History

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 315: The Italian Renaissance, or the Art of Success (ARTHIST 115)

How come that, even if you have never set foot in Italy, you have heard of Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael? What made them so incredibly famous, back then as well as today? This course examines the shooting of those, and other, artists to fame. It provides in-depth analyses of their innovative drawing practices and the making of masterpieces, taking you through a virtual journey across some of the greatest European and American collections. At the same time, this course also offers a study of the mechanics of success, how opportunities are created and reputations managed, and what role art plays in the construction of class and in today's national politics."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lugli, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 320: Superhero Theory (AMSTUD 120B, ARTHIST 120, FILMSTUD 120, FILMSTUD 320)

With their fantastic powers, mutable bodies, multiple identities, complicated histories, and visual dynamism, the American superhero has been a rich vehicle for fantasies (and anxieties) for 80+ years across multiple media, including comics, film, animation, TV, games, toys, and apparel. This course will center upon the body of the superhero, as it incarnates allegories of race, queerness, hybridity, sexuality, gendered stereotypes/fluidity, politics, vigilantism, masculinity, and monstrosity. They also embody a technological history that encompasses industrial, atomic, electronic, bio-genetic, and the digital.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bukatman, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 343A: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 143A, CEE 32R)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beischer, T. (PI)

ARTHIST 386: Theme and Style in Japanese Art (ARTHIST 186, JAPAN 186, JAPAN 286)

A mixture of lecture and discussion, this course presents a chronological introduction to some of the defining monuments in the history of Japanese visual culture from prehistory to the mid-19th century. This introductory class presumes no prior knowledge of art history or of Japan. We will emphasize certain overarching themes like religious life; notions of decorum appropriate to various classes (court, warrior, and commoner); the relationship between and among the arts, such as the visual and the verbal, or the symphonic assemblage arts as seen in the tea ceremony; pervasive cultural tropes like nostalgia, seasonality, or the sense of place; and broader issues such as censorship, patronage, gender issues, and the encounters between Japanese and foreign cultures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Takeuchi, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 407: The Resurrected Body: Animacy in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 207)

This course explores the relationship of spirit and matter in medieval art and architecture, more specifically how the changing appearance of objects and spaces evokes the presence of the metaphysical as glitter, reverberation, and shadow. We will engage objects and monuments across the Mediterranean, studying the way they were staged in order to produce the perception of liveliness. The phenomenology of liveliness will be tied to the development of the theology of resurrection of the body.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pentcheva, B. (PI)

ARTHIST 424: Architecture as Performance from Antiquity to the Enlightenment (ARTHIST 224)

This seminar examines the nature of architectural representation in the western tradition, from antiquity until the 18th century. It considers the ancient theatre as an icon of representation and the afterlife of the stage building as a model for western architecture, including ephemera. It concludes a distinction between the theatrical and the more recent concept of the theatrical.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Barry, F. (PI)

ARTHIST 430: Cinema and Ideology (FILMSTUD 430)

The relationship between cinema and ideology from theoretical and historical perspectives, emphasizing Marxist and psychoanalytic approaches. The practice of political filmmaking, and the cinema as an audiovisual apparatus and socio-cultural institution. Topics include: dialectics; revolutionary aesthetics; language and power; commodity fetishism; and nationalism. Filmmakers include Dziga Vertov, Jean-Luc Godard, Bruce Conner, and Marco Ferreri. Theoretical writers include Karl Marx, Sergei Eisenstein, and Slavoj Zizek. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levi, P. (PI)

ARTHIST 440: Millennium Approaches: The Art of the 1990s (ARTHIST 240)

This seminar will examine the art historical legacy of the 1990s, the decade of Bill Clinton, Beavis and Butthead, and Y2K. By placing art in conversation with music, popular culture, and political events, we will explore the dark underbelly of the decade's facade of sunny optimism. Key topics will include the the end of the Cold War, multiculturalism, American interventionism, the AIDS crisis, and early internet culture. Artists covered will include Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Kim Gordon, Mike Kelly, the Young British Artists, Gregg Bordowitz, Lorna Simpson, Zoe Leonard, Byron Kim, and Glenn Ligon. What is the relationship between art, popular culture, and history? How did the 1990s help shape our current culture?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 460: Meta-Pictures

What happens to a painting or a photograph when it depicts another representation inside itself? Either as a window or as a literal other picture, or even in the portrayal of a shadow cast by a tree (itself a kind of representation), works of art change their nature, expanding their claims on our imagination, when they portray these "other worlds" that both consolidate and destroy the main picture they inhabit. Focusing on Victor Stoichita's The Self-Aware Image (1997), among other texts, we will discuss Renaissance and Baroque painting primarily but with ample room for students to write final papers on meta-pictures from many eras and places.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Nemerov, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 502: Methods and Debates

Problems in visuality, authorship, representation, and the institutions of art history, among other issues that have helped to shape - and to challenge - the the discipline and its practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 600: Art History Bibliography and Library Methods

Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 620: Qualifying Examination Preparation

For Art History Ph.D. candidates. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 640: Dissertation Proposal Preparation

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 650: Dissertation Research

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 660: Independent Study

For graduate students only. Approved independent research projects with individual faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 660E: Extended Seminar

May be repeated for credit. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 680: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree. Prerequisite: Art History Ph.D. candidate.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vinograd, R. (PI)
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