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ANTHRO 16: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 116C, ARCHLGY 16, NATIVEAM 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 41: Genes and Identity (AFRICAAM 41, CSRE 41A)

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and anthropological works (ethnographies). We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (as proof of heritage, disease risk, or legal standing) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. Throughout we will look at how new social movements are organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, health, and legal truth. Several examples include political analyses of citizenship and belonging. On this count we will discuss issues of African ancestry testing as evidence in slavery reparations cases, revisit debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, and hear arguments on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel. We will also examine the ways genetic knowledge may shape different health politics at the individual and societal level. On this count we will do close readings of how personal genomics testing companies operate, we will investigate how health disparities funding as well as orphan disease research take on new valences when re-framed in genetic terms, and we will see how new articulations of global health priorities are emerging through genetic research in places like Africa. Finally we will explore social implications of forensic uses of DNA. Here we will examine civil liberties concerns about genetic familial searching in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects, and inquire into the use of DNA to generate digital mugshots of suspects that re-introduce genetic concepts of race.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fullwiley, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 80A: Heritage and Human Rights (ARCHLGY 80)

What does archaeology have to say about human rights? Is there a right to cultural heritage? How can archaeology and heritage help protect rights¿or encroach upon them? Themes we will address in this course include the archaeological investigation of human rights topics; the right to heritage; conflicts of different rights regimes in heritage contexts; and ethical considerations about rights during research and heritage management. These questions will take us to cases as diverse as forensic investigation of the disappeared in Argentina, the archaeology of homelessness in the U.K., the destruction of heritage as cultural genocide in Bosnia and the Middle East, and the rights of indigenous groups in Australia and the U.S. to control cultural heritage.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bolin, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 93: Prefield Research Seminar

For Anthropology majors only; non-majors register for 93B. Preparation for anthropological field research in other societies and the U.S. Data collection techniques include participant observation, interviewing, surveys, sampling procedures, life histories, ethnohistory, and the use of documentary materials. Strategies of successful entry into the community, research ethics, interpersonal dynamics, and the reflexive aspects of fieldwork. Prerequisites: two ANTHRO courses or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tambar, K. (PI)

ANTHRO 93B: Prefield Research Seminar: Non-Majors

Preparation for anthropological field research in other societies and the U.S. Data collection techniques include participant observation, interviewing, surveys, sampling procedures, life histories, ethnohistory, and the use of documentary materials. Strategies for successful entry into the community, research ethics, interpersonal dynamics, and the reflexive aspects of fieldwork. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hagerty, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 95: Research in Anthropology

Independent research conducted under faculty supervision, normally taken junior or senior year in pursuit of a senior paper or an honors project. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 95B: Directed Study in Honors and Senior Papers

Taken in the final quarter before graduation. Independent study and work on senior paper for students admitted to the program. Prerequisite: consent of program adviser and instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 97: Internship in Anthropology

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 116C: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 16, ARCHLGY 16, NATIVEAM 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 119B: Tech Ethics and Ethnography: the human in human-computer interaction

Do machines have culture? How do engineers write themselves into their products? Can we better anticipate the unexpected and unwanted consequences of technologies?nnTaking as its point of departure the discipline of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), which examines the design and use of computer technology, this course shifts the focus to the humans creating and utilizing the technology. It invites us to think about computer science and social science together and learn how ethnographic methods can be utilized for ethical thinking and design in technology. This course will combine rigorous theoretical thinking with hands-on in-the-field research. Students will devise and engage in their own ethnographic research projects. This course will be of interest to students from a wide range of disciplines, including: computer science, engineering, medicine, anthropology, sociology, and the humanities. Our aim is to have a truly interdisciplinary and open-ended discussion about one of the most pressing social issues of our time, while giving students skills-based training in qualitative methods.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 123B: Government of Water and Crisis: Corporations, States and the Environment

As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the 200 troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had ¿turned an American city into a Third World country [¿] it¿s terrible what he¿s done [¿] no fresh water.¿ Then at the first Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee, Jason Chaffetz, said, ¿This is the United States of America ¿ this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country.¿nnWhat is a `third world problem¿? And is the `water problem¿ the same across the world? This course examines how water is governed in a time that is increasingly seen as one of crisis. We will examine how crises are imagined, constructed, sought to be averted, and the governance regimes they give rise to. And how does water, whether as natural resource, public good, a human right, or commodity, determine the contours of such regimes? We will focus mostly on ethnographies, but also examine texts produced by government bodies and aid and environmental organizations, as well as case law. The course will show what anthropology can contribute to the conversation on state and corporate bureaucracies, and their relation with water.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 127D: HERITAGE POLITICS (ARCHLGY 127, ARCHLGY 227)

Heritage is a matter of the heart and not the brain, David Lowenthal once said. It does not seek to explore the past, but to domesticate it and enlist it for present causes. From the drafting of the first royal decrees on ancient monuments in the 17th century, political interests have had a hand in deciding which traditions, monuments and sites best represent and best serve the needs of the nation. The sum of these domestication efforts, the laws, institutions and practices established to protect and manage heritage, is what we call heritage governance. In this seminar you will learn about the politics of 21st century heritage governance at national and international level. Students will become familiar with key conventions and learn about the functioning of heritage institutions. We will also examine the hidden practices and current political developments that impact heritage governance: how UNESCO heritage sites become bargaining tools in international relations, how EU heritage policies are negotiated in the corridors of Brussels, and how the current re-nationalization of Western politics can affect what we come to know as our common past.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Niklasson, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 133: Masculinity: Technologies and Cultures of Gender (ANTHRO 233, FEMGEN 133M)

What is masculinity? How are masculinities invested with power and meaning in cultural contexts? How is anthropological attention to them informed by and extending inquiry across the academy in spheres such as culture studies, political theory, gender studies, history, and science and technology studies? Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kohrman, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 154C: Animism, Gaia, and Alternative Approaches to the Environment (ANTHRO 254C, ARCHLGY 154, ARCHLGY 254, DLCL 254, REES 254)

Indigenous knowledges have been traditionally treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as mistaken epistemologies, i.e., un-scientific and irrational folklore. However, within the framework of environmental humanities, current interest in non-anthropocentric approaches and epistemic injustice, animism emerged as a critique of modern epistemology and an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge will be presented as a (potentially) decolonizing and liberating practice. This course may be of interest to anthropology, archaeology and literature students working in the fields of ecocriticism and the environmental humanities/social sciences, students interested in the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral, bio-, eco- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms and non-human agencies. The course is designed as a research seminar for students interested in theory of the humanities and social sciences and simultaneously helping students to develop their individual projects and thesis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Domanska, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 156: Japanese Anthropology (ANTHRO 256)

This is an advanced reading seminar in the field of Japanses Anthropology. nIt will explore the historical development of the field and the contemporary issues and topics taken up by scholars of Japanese anthropology. Prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, and, society is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 199: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 299)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Can, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 233: Masculinity: Technologies and Cultures of Gender (ANTHRO 133, FEMGEN 133M)

What is masculinity? How are masculinities invested with power and meaning in cultural contexts? How is anthropological attention to them informed by and extending inquiry across the academy in spheres such as culture studies, political theory, gender studies, history, and science and technology studies? Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kohrman, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 254C: Animism, Gaia, and Alternative Approaches to the Environment (ANTHRO 154C, ARCHLGY 154, ARCHLGY 254, DLCL 254, REES 254)

Indigenous knowledges have been traditionally treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as mistaken epistemologies, i.e., un-scientific and irrational folklore. However, within the framework of environmental humanities, current interest in non-anthropocentric approaches and epistemic injustice, animism emerged as a critique of modern epistemology and an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge will be presented as a (potentially) decolonizing and liberating practice. This course may be of interest to anthropology, archaeology and literature students working in the fields of ecocriticism and the environmental humanities/social sciences, students interested in the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral, bio-, eco- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms and non-human agencies. The course is designed as a research seminar for students interested in theory of the humanities and social sciences and simultaneously helping students to develop their individual projects and thesis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Domanska, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 256: Japanese Anthropology (ANTHRO 156)

This is an advanced reading seminar in the field of Japanses Anthropology. nIt will explore the historical development of the field and the contemporary issues and topics taken up by scholars of Japanese anthropology. Prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, and, society is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 299: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 199)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Can, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 300: Reading Theory Through Ethnography

Required of and restricted to first-year ANTHRO Ph.D. students. Focus is on contemporary ethnography and related cultural and social theories generated by texts. Topics include agency, resistance, and identity formation, and discourse analysis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 308: Proposal Writing Seminar in Cultural and Social Anthropology

Required of second-year Ph.D. students in the culture and society track. The conceptualization of dissertation research problems, the theories behind them, and the methods for exploring them. Participants draft a research prospectus suitable for a dissertation proposal and research grant applications. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yanagisako, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 308A: Proposal Writing Seminar in Archaeology

Required of second-year Ph.D. students in the archaeology track. The conceptualization of dissertation research problems, the theories behind them, and the methods for exploring them. Participants draft a research prospectus suitable for a dissertation proposal and research grant applications. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Meskell, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 308B: Interdisciplinary Research Proposals: Effective Presentation, Skills, and Styles

This seminar examines the diverse skills, methods, and styles required for the development and production of interdisciplinary dissertation and grant proposals. Topical focus centers primarily on proposals with both social science and natural science elements. Proposals may include a diverse suite of methods and analyses. Throughout this course, we critique examples, assess writing styles and presentation, evaluate budgets, assess data management plans, examine tables and figures, and discuss reviews and evaluations of research proposals. Students are expected to be either in the early stages of writing their dissertation proposal or preparing applications for grants and fellowships. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Curran, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 311G: Introduction to Culture and Society Graduate Studies in Anthropology

Required graduate seminar for CS track. The history of anthropological theory and key theoretical and methodological issues in cultural anthropology. Prerequistes: this course is open only to Ph.D. students in anthropology or by permission of the instructor.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hansen, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 323: Graduate Seminar in Economic Anthropology

Classical and contemporary anthropological perspectives on topics such as money, markets and exchange; capitalist and non-capitalist modes of production; class and socio-economic differentiation; globalization and neoliberalism; and the social and cultural construction of the object, "the economy". Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ferguson, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 356A: The Universal and the Vernacular. The Global Life of Concepts and Social Forms

Mapping and understanding vernacular concepts and terminologies has always been central to the anthropological quest to understand societies from `a native point of view'. This has often been accompanied by a critique of universalist and Euro-centric assumptions in the social sciences and in social theory. As a result, the convention has become to treat the `universal¿ (ideas, frames, institutions) as external, often imposed by colonial powers, while the `vernacular¿ conventionally is seen as local and authentic, and the proper site of anthropology.nThis course seeks to rethink this spatial and historical distinction between the universal and the vernacular. Instead we ask: how, and when, do concepts, or practices, become embedded in a vernacular world? Reversely, instead of assuming that universals all originate in Euro-America, we ask: how do concepts and practices become both global and universal? We will trace how impactful ideologies, social forms and institutions have travelled in time to become perceived as elements of vernacular cultures. nDrawing on ethnographic and historical examples across the world, each week will trace the universal and vernacular lives of important concepts such as: `tradition¿, `the individual¿, `community¿, `the people¿; `humanity¿, `dignity¿; `equality¿, `sacrifice¿, `cosmopolitanism¿, `civility¿.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hansen, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 363: Queer Anthropology

Feminist and queer theory have profoundly rethought epistemologies as well as methodologies. This graduate seminar will explore the relationship between feminist and queer theory and the new directions proposed by queer anthropology in socio-cultural anthropology and archaeology. In addition, the seminar will discuss the challenges that looking at queer studies from anthropology and archaeology can bring from questions of race, global inequalities, misrecognitions as well as specific historical and cultural genealogies which offer more than simply adding diversity to questions already raised within queer studies. Students will acquire both conceptual and methodological skills. nThis year-long graduate seminar adopts a workshop-like format over the entire 2018-2019 academic year. We will meet for eleven (three hour) meetings over three quarters (4 meetings in Autumn, 3 meetings in Winter, and 4 meetings in Spring. Students are required to enroll in all three quarters. Pre-requisite: instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 400: Cultural and Social Dissertation Writers Seminar

Required of fifth-year Ph.D. students returning from dissertation field research and in the process of writing dissertations and preparing for professional employment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jain, S. (PI); Tambar, K. (PI)

ANTHRO 401A: Qualifying Examination: Topic

Required of second- and third-year Ph.D. students writing the qualifying paper or the qualifying written examination. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 401B: Qualifying Examination: Area

Required of second- and third-year Ph.D. students writing the qualifying paper or the qualifying written examination. May be repeated for credit one time.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 441: Master's Research Thesis

Supervised work for terminal and coterminal master's students writing the master's project in the final quarter of the degree program.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 442: Reading Group

Graduate student reading group on a thematic topic of interest.nIntended for first or second-year cohort PhD students.nSections: Liisa Malkki, Sylvia Yanagisako, Thomas Hansen, Paulla Ebron, andnMiyako Inoue
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 444: Anthropology Colloquium

Department Colloquia Lecture Series. Lectures presented on a variety of anthropological topics. Colloquium is intended for the Department of Anthropology's under graduate majors and graduate students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 445: Anthropology Brown Bag Series

Current topics and trends in cultural/social anthropology, archaeology, and environmental and ecological anthropology. Enrollment in this noon-time series is restricted to the Department of Anthropology Master¿s students and First and Second-year PhD students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 450: Research Apprenticeship

Supervised work on a research project with an individual faculty member. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 451: Directed Individual Study

Supervised work for a qualifying paper, examination, or project with an individual faculty member.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 452: Graduate Internship

Provides graduate students with the opportunity to pursue their area of specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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