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AMSTUD 73: Mexican Migration to the United States (CHILATST 173, HISTORY 73, HISTORY 173)

(History 73 is 3 units; History 173 is 5 units.) This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama's immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border. Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants' experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 100: Intro to Asian American Studies (ASNAMST 100)

What is meant by the term Asian American? How have representations of Asian Americans influenced concepts of US citizenship and belonging? What are the social and political origins of the Asian American community? This course provides a critical introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Asian American studies. Drawing on historical, creative, and scholarly texts, the course examines the history and possibilities of Asian American community. To do this, we place the Asian American experience within a transnational context, paying particular attention to the ways that Asian American lives have been shaped by the legacies of US wars in Asia and by the history of US racism. In the process, we examine the role that representations of Asian Americans have played in shaping the boundaries of US citizenship and belonging. Throughout the course, we utilize our discussions of Asian American racialization and community formation to think critically about the social and political ramifications that the designation Asian American entails.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gow, W. (PI)

AMSTUD 107: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (CSRE 108, FEMGEN 101, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 117: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary American Film (AFRICAAM 117J, ASNAMST 117D, CSRE 117D, FEMGEN 117F)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and analytical frameworks necessary to critically understand constructions of race, gender, and sexuality in contemporary American film. Through a sustained engagement with a range of independent and Hollywood films produced since 2000, students analyze the ways that cinematic representations have both reflected and constructed dominant notions of race, gender, and sexuality in the United States. Utilizing an intersectional framework that sees race, gender, and sexuality as always defined by one another, the course examines the ways that dominant notions of difference have been maintained and contested through film in the United States. Films to be discussed include Coco, Get Out, Moonlight, Mosquita y Mari, and The Grace Lee Project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gow, W. (PI)

AMSTUD 120B: Superhero Theory (ARTHIST 120, ARTHIST 320, FILMSTUD 120, FILMSTUD 320)

With their fantastic powers, mutable bodies, multiple identities, complicated histories, and visual dynamism, the American superhero has been a rich vehicle for fantasies (and anxieties) for 80+ years across multiple media, including comics, film, animation, TV, games, toys, and apparel. This course will center upon the body of the superhero, as it incarnates allegories of race, queerness, hybridity, sexuality, gendered stereotypes/fluidity, politics, vigilantism, masculinity, and monstrosity. They also embody a technological history that encompasses industrial, atomic, electronic, bio-genetic, and the digital.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bukatman, S. (PI)

AMSTUD 125: Perspectives on American Journalism (COMM 125, COMM 225)

An examination of American journalism, focusing on how news is produced, distributed, and financially supported. Emphasis on current media controversies and puzzles, and on designing innovations in discovering and telling stories. (Graduate students register for COMM 225.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hamilton, J. (PI)

AMSTUD 143A: American Architecture (ARTHIST 143A, ARTHIST 343A, CEE 32R)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beischer, T. (PI)

AMSTUD 143X: Starstuff: Space and the American Imagination (ARTHIST 264B, FILMSTUD 264B)

Course on the history of twentieth and twenty-first century American images of space and how they shape conceptions of the universe. Covers representations made by scientists and artists, as well as scientific fiction films, TV, and other forms of popular visual culture. Topics will include the importance of aesthetics to understandings of the cosmos; the influence of media and technology on representations; the social, political, and historical context of the images; and the ways representations of space influence notions of American national identity and of cosmic citizenship.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kessler, E. (PI)

AMSTUD 145J: The Jewish-American Novel: Diaspora, Privilege, Anxiety, Comedy (ENGLISH 145J, JEWISHST 155J)

Jews are sometimes referred to as 'the people of the book.' Would Portnoy's Complaint count as a book that constitutes Jewish-American peoplehood? What about Fear of Flying? This seminar introduces students to influential Jewish-American novels (and some short stories and film) from the late nineteenth century to the present day. These works return time and again to questions of diaspora, race, queer social belonging, and the duty to a Jewish past, mythical or real. Through close readings of short stories and novels coupled with secondary readings about Jewish-American history and culture, we will explore how American Jewishness is constructed differently in changing historical climates. What makes a text Jewish? What do we mean by Jewish humor and Jewish seriousness? How do Jewish formulations of gender and power respond to Jews' entrance into the white American mainstream? As we read, we'll think through and elaborate on models of ethnicity, privilege, sexuality, and American pluralism. Authors include Cahan, Yezierska, Singer, Roth, Bellow, Malamud, Ozick, Mailer, Jong, and Englander.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Atura Bushnell, A. (PI)

AMSTUD 147J: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: The Soul Tradition in African American Music (AFRICAAM 19, CSRE 147J, MUSIC 147J, MUSIC 247J)

The African American tradition of soul music from its origins in blues, gospel, and jazz to its influence on today's r&b, hip hop, and dance music. Style such as rhythm and blues, Motown, Southern soul, funk, Philadelphia soul, disco, Chicago house, Detroit techno, trip hop, and neo-soul. Soul's cultural influence and global reach; its interaction with politics, gender, place, technology, and the economy. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 150A: Colonial and Revolutionary America (HISTORY 150A)

(Same as HISTORY 50A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for HISTORY 150A.) Survey of the origins of American society and polity in the 17th and 18th centuries. Topics: the migration of Europeans and Africans and the impact on native populations; the emergence of racial slavery and of regional, provincial, Protestant cultures; and the political origins and constitutional consequences of the American Revolution.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 155: American Constitutional History from the Civil War to the War on Poverty (HISTORY 155)

This course addresses U.S. constitutional history from the post-Civil War Reconstruction period through the mid-20th century. Because of the breadth of the subject matter, the view will necessarily be partial. In particular we will take as our focus the way the Constitution has provided a point of political mobilization for social movements challenging economic and social inequality. Topics covered include: Civil War Reconstruction and restoration; the rise of corporate capitalism and efforts to constrain it; Progressive Era regulation; the New Deal challenge to federalism and the anti-New Deal backlash; government spending; WWII and the Japanese Internment; the Civil Rights Era, and the War on Poverty. Readings will include both legal and historical materials with a focus on the relationship between law and society. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Paper extensions will be granted with instructor permission. No automatic grading penalty for late papers. Cross-listed with the Law School (LAW 7008),
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dauber, M. (PI)

AMSTUD 160: Perspectives on American Identity (ENGLISH 165)

Required for American Studies majors. In this seminar we trace diverse and changing interpretations of American identity by exploring autobiographical, literary, and/or visual texts from the 18th through the 20th century in conversation with sociological, political, and historical accounts. *Fulfills Writing In the Major Requirement for American Studies Majors*
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Richardson, J. (PI)

AMSTUD 163: Queer America (ARTHIST 163, FEMGEN 163)

This class explores queer art, photography and politics in the United States since 1930. Our approach will be grounded in close attention to the history and visual representation of sexual minorities in particular historical moments and social contexts. We will consider the cultural and political effects of World War II, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, psychedelics, hippie culture and sexual liberation, lesbian separatism, the AIDS crisis, and marriage equality.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Meyer, R. (PI)

AMSTUD 168D: American Prophet: The Inner Life and Global Vision of Martin Luther King, Jr. (AFRICAAM 68D, CSRE 68, HISTORY 68D, HISTORY 168D)

Martin Luther King, Jr., was the 20th-century's best-known African-American leader, but the religious roots of his charismatic leadership are far less widely known. The documents assembled and published by Stanford's King Research and Education Institute provide the source materials for this exploration of King's swift rise to international prominence as an articulate advocate of global peace and justice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 179: Introduction to American Law (POLISCI 122, PUBLPOL 302A)

For undergraduates. The structure of the American legal system including the courts; American legal culture; the legal profession and its social role; the scope and reach of the legal system; the background and impact of legal regulation; criminal justice; civil rights and civil liberties; and the relationship between the American legal system and American society in general.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 183: Re- Imagining American Borders (CSRE 183, FEMGEN 183)

In this third volatile and violent year of the Trump presidency, American borders of all kinds seem to be dangerously tight. This is seen in the literal horror of immigrant detention centers filled with hungry, sick children taken from parents, ongoing mass incarceration and police attacks on young black and brown men and gendered violence targeting trans Americans and pro-choice movements. Additionally urban and rural antagonisms and constant social media anger with a kind of newly brutal linguistic framing are all underscoring a vision of an America of intractable difference. The hopeful transformation from the 2018 elections, which is having enormous reverberations in the present 2020 presidential campaigns, is interestingly also based in a discourse of difference. This course investigates sources of these borderlines and most crucially how novelists, filmmakers, poets, visual artists and essayists perceive racial, ethnic, gender, religious, sexual orientation and class borders in this country as they may re-imagine difference possibly via Vijay Prashad's polyculturalism or Gloria Anzaldùa's borderlands. Texts include those of Ta-Nehisi Coates, Boots Riley, Dee Rees, Ryan Coogler, Nelly Rosario, Janice Lobo Sapigao, Layli Long Soldier, Naomi Shihab Nye, Edwidge Danticat, Sherman Alexie, Shailja Patel, Kara Walker, and the podcast Ear Hustle, narratives created and produced from inside San Quentin, along with Shane Bauer's undercover expose of an American prison. Course guests will include actors and writers from the acclaimed web series, The North Pole, showing parts of the new second season of biting, humorous stories of gentrification, racism and immigration issues in West Oakland. And the Bay Area founder of the only women-run, inclusive mosque in the US, Rabi¿a Keeble, will speak with us about an American Islam with a Muslim community that embraces difference. Course work includes active discussion, journal entries, one comparative analytical essay and a creative final project/with analytical paper examining personal or community identities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Duffey, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 185: American Studies Internship

Restricted to declared majors. Practical experience working in a field related to American Studies for six to ten weeks. Students make internship arrangements with a company or agency, under the guidance of a sponsoring faculty member, and with the consent of the director or a program coordinator of American Studies. Required paper focused on a topic related to the internship and the student's studies. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 186D: Asian American Art: 1850-Present (ARTHIST 186B, ASNAMST 186B)

What does it mean, and what has it meant historically, to be "Asian American" in the United States? This lecture course explores this question through the example of artists, craftspeople, and laborers of Asian descent. We will consider their work alongside the art, visual culture, and literature of the United States. Key themes will include the history of immigration law; questions of home and belonging; art, activism, and community; interethnic solidarity; and gender and queerness. Artists and authors will include Isamu Noguchi, Grace Lee Boggs, Nam June Paik, Yoko Ono, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Grace Lee Boggs, Zarina, Carlos Villa, Takashi Murakami, Anne Cheng, Lisa Lowe, among many others. In addition to learning the history of Asian Americans and reading key texts in Asian American studies, this course will also teach the foundational skills of close looking and primary source research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kwon, M. (PI)

AMSTUD 199A: American Studies Honors Seminar

*Enrollment Required for American Studies Honors students in their senior year.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kessler, E. (PI)

AMSTUD 200J: Doing Oral History (HISTORY 200J)

Students explore exemplary historical works based on oral histories and develop a range of practical skills while completing their own interviews. Topics include oral history and narrative theory, interview techniques, transcript preparation, and digital archiving. Students also learn how to analyze interviews using both qualitative and quantitative methods, practice writing history using oral evidence, and experiment with digital humanities approaches for disseminating oral history, including the Stanford Oral History Text Analysis Project. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 250: Senior Research

Research and writing of senior honors thesis under the supervision of a faculty member. The final grade for the thesis is assigned by the chair based on the evaluations of the primary thesis adviser and a second reader appointed by the program. Prerequisite: consent of chair.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fishkin, S. (PI)

AMSTUD 264: History of Prisons and Immigration Detention (CSRE 264, HISTORY 264, HISTORY 364)

This course will explore the history of the growing prison and immigration detention systems in the United States. They will pay particular attention to how they developed and how they affect different populations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Minian Andjel, A. (PI)
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