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AFRICAAM 18A: Jazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-1940 (MUSIC 18A)

From the beginning of jazz to the war years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Low, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 28: Health Impact of Sexual Assault and Relationship Abuse across the Lifecourse (FEMGEN 237, HUMBIO 28, SOMGEN 237)

Cross-listed with SOMGEN 237 and FEMGEN 237. HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 28 or AFRICAAM 28. An overview of the acute and chronic physical and psychological health impact of sexual abuse through the perspective of survivors of childhood, adolescent, young and middle adult, and elder abuse, including special populations such as pregnant women, military and veterans, prison inmates, individuals with mental or physical impairments. Also addresses: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other demographic and societal factors, including issues specific to college culture. Professionals with expertise in sexual assault present behavioral and prevention efforts such as bystander intervention training, medical screening, counseling and other interventions to manage the emotional trauma of abuse. Undergraduates must enroll for 3 units. Medical and graduate students should enroll in SOMGEN 237 for 1-3 units. To receive a letter grade in any listing, students must enroll for 3 units. This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 31: RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora

Students to engage in an intellectual discussion about the African Diaspora with leading faculty at Stanford across departments including Education, Linguistics, Sociology, History, Political Science, English, and Theater & Performance Studies. Several lunches with guest speakers. This course will meet in the Program for African & African American Studies Office in Building 360 Room 362B (Main Quad). This course is limited to Freshman and Sophomore enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brody, J. (PI); Brown, N. (PI)

AFRICAAM 47: History of South Africa (CSRE 74, HISTORY 47)

(Same as HISTORY 147. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 48Q: South Africa: Contested Transitions (HISTORY 48Q)

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for South Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Samoff, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 50B: Nineteenth Century America (CSRE 50S, HISTORY 50B)

(Same as HISTORY 150B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; White, R. (PI)

AFRICAAM 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (CS 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, C. (PI)

AFRICAAM 101Q: Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film (AMSTUD 42Q, CSRE 41Q)

Movies and the fiction that inspires them; power dynamics behind production including historical events, artistic vision, politics, and racial stereotypes. What images of black and white does Hollywood produce to forge a national identity? How do films promote equality between the races? What is lost or gained in film adaptations of books? NOTE: Students must attend the first day; admission to the class will be determined based on an in class essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mesa, C. (PI)

AFRICAAM 105: Black Matters: Introduction to Black Studies

This course situates the study of Black lives, known interchangeably as African American Studies, Black Studies, Africana Studies, or African Diaspora Studies, within the context of ongoing struggles against anti-Black racism. We will explore the founding principles and purposes of the field, the evolution of its imperatives, its key debates, and the lives and missions of its progenitors and practitioners. In doing so we will survey, broadly and deeply, the diverse historical, political, social, cultural, and economic experiences and expressions of the African Diaspora.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Benjamin Golden, K. (PI)

AFRICAAM 111: AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa (AFRICAST 112, AFRICAST 212)

Foreign aid can help Africa, say the advocates. Certainly not, say the critics. Is foreign aid a solution? or a problem? Should there be more aid, less aid, or none at all? Africa has developed imaginative and innovative approaches in many sectors. At the same time, many African countries have become increasingly dependent on foreign aid. How do foreign aid and local initiatives intersect? We will examine several contentious issues in contemporary Africa, exploring roots, contested analyses, and proposed solutions, examining foreign aid and the aid relationship. As African communities and countries work to shape their future, what are the foreign roles, and what are their consequences?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Samoff, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 117: Maroon Freedom: Black Resistance, Autonomy, and Fugitivity in the U.S. South

Maroons and their communities, or communities of those some would call ¿runawaynslaves,¿ were an ever-present feature of slaveholding societies throughout the Americas. Everywhere they existed, they proved the indomitable spirit of African people and the inherent failure of the institution of slavery. This course examines the conditions and characteristics of marronage specific to the U.S. south ¿ a site that was far from impervious to this hemispheric tradition of enslaved resistance. We will look closely at the demographic, economic, and geographic opportunities for enslaved mobility and resistance that shaped marronage in U.S. contexts. Our analysis includes marronage as it occurred in the Spanish and French colonial territories of Louisiana and Florida. The central focus will be the historical impact of marronage on enslaved and enslaver communities in the south from 1700 to 1865. Moving across space and time, this course takes a chronological,nthematic, and interdisciplinary approach to investigating maroon survival, autonomy, gender, kinship, community, and the relationship between marronage and insurrection. We examine a wide range of evidence spanning periodicals, state mandates, archaeology, runaway slave advertisements, slave narratives, oral histories, and traveler¿s logs, in addition to secondary literature.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAAM 118X: Critical Family History: Narratives of Identity and Difference (AMSTUD 118, ASNAMST 118S, CSRE 118S)

This course examines family history as a site for understanding identity, power, and social difference in American society. Focusing in particular on the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality, we approach the family as an archive through which we might write alternative histories to the ones that dominate the national historical consciousness. To do this, we examine memoirs, oral histories, and first-person documentaries as historical texts that can be used to foreground marginalized historical voices. Students will then be asked to apply course readings and theories to their own family histories as a means of better understanding issues of identity and difference.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gow, W. (PI)

AFRICAAM 147: History of South Africa (CSRE 174, HISTORY 147)

(Same as HISTORY 47. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 150B: Nineteenth Century America (AMSTUD 150B, CSRE 150S, HISTORY 150B)

(Same as HISTORY 50B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; White, R. (PI)

AFRICAAM 155J: Global Black Feminism (CSRE 155J, FEMGEN 155J, GERMAN 155, GERMAN 355)

Have you ever wondered what Black feminism looks like internationally? This course examines the transnational aspects of Black feminism from the 1800s to the present day. We will examine Black women transgressing boundaries both real and imagined. Students will gain insights into what motivated these women to make transnational connections and alliances, and how these connections lead to further developments of their own theories of race and gender. Because the patriarchy is not located within one nation state, Black feminism cannot be located in one nation state either. We will explore Black feminist experiences in a variety of places including: Germany, Nigeria, China, the UK, Netherlands, and more. Students will explore poetry, autobiography, theater, film, YouTube, by Black women to grasp the ideas that global Black feminism(s)/womanism encompasses. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Watkins, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 157P: Solidarity and Racial Justice (AMSTUD 157P, CSRE 157P, FEMGEN 157P)

Is multiracial solidarity necessary to overcome oppression that disproportionately affects certain communities of color? What is frontline leadership and what role should people play if they are not part of frontline communities? In this course we will critically examine practices of solidarity and allyship in movements for collective liberation. Through analysis of historical and contemporary movements, as well as participation in movement work, we will see how movements have built multiracial solidarity to address issues that are important to the liberation of all. We will also see how racial justice intersects with other identities and issues. This course is for students that want to learn how to practice solidarity, whether to be better allies or to work more effectively with allies. There will be a community engaged learning option for this course. Students who choose to participate in this option will either work with Stanford's DGen Office or a community organization that is explicitly devoted to multiracial movement-building.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marquez, R. (PI)

AFRICAAM 179A: Crime and Punishment in America (CSRE 179A, SOC 179A, SOC 279A)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the way crime has been defined and punished in the United States. Recent social movements such as the Movement for Black Lives have drawn attention to the problem of mass incarceration and officer-involved shootings of people of color. These movements have underscored the centrality of the criminal justice system in defining citizenship, race, and democracy in America. How did our country get here? This course provides a social scientific perspective on America¿s past and present approach to crime and punishment. Readings and discussions focus on racism in policing, court processing, and incarceration; the social construction of crime and violence; punishment among the privileged; the collateral consequences of punishment in poor communities of color; and normative debates about social justice, racial justice, and reforming the criminal justice system. Students will learn to gather their own knowledge and contribute to normative debates through a field report assignment and an op-ed writing assignment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clair, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 180S: The Black Music 1980s: Turntables, Beat Machines and DJ Scholarship (CSRE 180S)

This course focuses on the regional rhythms and aesthetic trends of Black popular music of the Americas in the 1980s, a period of Black cultural production largely ignored by the academy. Students will investigate how technology, economic shifts, AIDS, and the War on Drugs impacted communities who produced, created, and danced to music in the face of hostile political terrain. Students will develop and employ careful listening practices that encompass the study of sampling, digging through crates of vinyl, analyzing album cover art, and closely reading liner notes. The musical forms we will cover range from New Jack Swing to Quiet Storm Music to Synthesizer Soul. Figures we will study include nontraditional scholars and practitioners, artists, activists, music journalists, and cultural critics. Finally, students will map the digital movement of music, people, and ideas through post-human platforms such as computer-based home recording studios, portable sound systems, beat-making equipment, keytars, turntables, and sampling machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Banks, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 195: Independent Study

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 199X: Preparation for Senior Thesis (ANTHRO 189X, CSRE 199, FEMGEN 199X)

This course is designed for juniors (majors, minors, and those seeking Interdisciplinary Honors in CSRE or FGSS) who intend to write a senior thesis in one of the CSRE Family of Programs or FGSS Interdisciplinary Honors. The course offers resources and strategies for putting together a significant and original senior thesis. Topics to be covered include: getting funding; finding an advisor; navigating the institutional review board; formulating an appropriate question; and finding the right data/medium/texts.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

AFRICAAM 200Y: Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research

Winter. Required for students writing an Honors Thesis. Optional for Students writing a Senior Thesis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brown, N. (PI)

AFRICAAM 205K: The Age of Revolution: America, France, and Haiti (HISTORY 205K, HISTORY 305K)

(History 205K is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 305K is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) This course examines the "Age of Revolution," spanning the 18th and 19th centuries. Primarily, this course will focus on the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions (which overthrew both French and white planter rule). Taken together, these events reshaped definitions of citizenship, property, and government. But could republican principles-- color-blind in rhetoric-- be so in fact? Could nations be both republican and pro-slavery? Studying a wide range of primary materials, this course will explore the problem of revolution in an age of empires, globalization, and slavery.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivarius, K. (PI)

AFRICAAM 238J: The European Scramble for Africa: Origins and Debates (HISTORY 238J, HISTORY 338J)

Why and how did Europeans claim control of 70% of African in the late nineteenth century? Students will engage with historiographical debates ranging from the national (e.g. British) to the topical (e.g. international law). Students will interrogate some of the primary sources on which debaters have rested their arguments. Key discussions include: the British occupation of Egypt; the autonomy of French colonial policy; the mystery of Germany¿s colonial entry; and, not least, the notorious Berlin Conference of 1884-1885.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Press, S. (PI)

AFRICAAM 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (CSRE 245, EDUC 245)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

AFRICAAM 250J: Baldwin and Hansberry: The Myriad Meanings of Love (AMSTUD 250J, CSRE 250J, FEMGEN 250J, TAPS 250J)

This course looks at major dramatic works by James Baldwin and Lorraine Hansberry. Both of these queer black writers had prophetic things to say about the world-historical significance of major dramas on the 20th Century including civil rights, revolution, gender, colonialism, racism, sexism, war, nationalism and as well as aesthetics and politics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brody, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 288: Tell Me Why That's (Non-)Human Nature': New Materialism and Black Life

This course considers various entanglements of blackness and wrestles with the following questions: What is humanism? Why and how is race routinely excluded from discussions of ecological crises? From the vantage of black feminism and Black Studies, is new materialism actually ¿new¿? What are the racial and racist dynamics of quantum physics? How do these discourses help us consider aspects of visual culture and literature anew? This body of work will regularly touch on affect theory, post-humanism, queer theory, science-fiction, animality/animal studies, and disability studies, among other discourses. This course will enable students to consider the material stakes of blackness as they challenge the categories of human, environment, and embodiment.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 389C: Race, Ethnicity, and Language: Pedagogical Possibilities (CSRE 385, EDUC 389C)

This seminar explores the intersections of language and race/racism/racialization in the public schooling experiences of students of color. We will briefly trace the historical emergence of the related fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology, explore how each of these scholarly traditions approaches the study of language, and identify key points of overlap and tension between the two fields before considering recent examples of inter-disciplinary scholarship on language and race in urban schools. Issues to be addressed include language variation and change, language and identity, bilingualism and multilingualism, language ideologies, and classroom discourse. We will pay particular attention to the implications of relevant literature for teaching and learning in urban classrooms.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Banks, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 428: Intersectional Justice in Education Policy and Practice (EDUC 428)

This 3-5-unit, graduate course is designed to explore intersectionality as a "method and a disposition, a heuristic and an analytic tool" (Carbado, Crenshaw, Mays, & Tomlinson, 2013, p. 11). To do this we explore the intellectual lineage of intersectional thought from its Black Feminist roots and trace it through its use today in education research. Within these tracings, we will delve into the (mis)uses, contestations, and iterations of intersectionality in theory and empirical research. At the heart of this course is an examination of how perceptions of and beliefs about a myriad of intertwining inequities conspire to create vectors of oppressions that land in multiply¿marginalized students' lives through the macrosociolpolitcal to the microinteractional. It interrogates the foundational ideological assumptions around culture, difference, deficit, and dis/ability in which education has traditionally been rooted. Students in the course will analyze the lineage and processes of intersectionality to understand how students at the intersections of multiple oppressions experience education within communities of practice that enact, reproduce, and resist policies and practices through their daily activities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Annamma, S. (PI)
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