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AA 100: Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

This class introduces the basics of aeronautics and astronautics through applied physics, hands-on activities, and real world examples. The principles of fluid flow, flight, and propulsion for aircraft will be illustrated, including the creation of lift and drag, aerodynamic performance including takeoff, climb, range, and landing. The principles of orbits, maneuvers, space environment, and propulsion for spacecraft will be illustrated. Students will be exposed to the history and challenges of aeronautics and astronautics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 102: Introduction to Applied Aerodynamics

This course explores the fundamentals of the behavior of aerodynamic surfaces (airfoils, wings, bodies) immersed in a fluid across all speed regimes (from subsonic to supersonic/hypersonic). We will cover airfoil theory (subsonic and supersonic), wing theory, and introduction to viscous flows and both laminar and turbulent boundary layers, and the topic of flow transition. At the completion of this course, students will be able to understand and predict the forces and movements generated by aerodynamic configurations of interest. Assignments require a basic introductory knowledge of MATLAB or another suitable programming language. Prerequisites: CME 100 and CME 102 (or equivalent), PHYS 41, AA 100, and AA 101 or ME 70.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Alonso, J. (PI)

AA 118N: How to Design a Space Mission: from Concept to Execution

Space exploration is truly fascinating. From the space race led by governments as an outgrowth of the Cold War to the new era of space commercialization led by private companies and startups, more than 50 years have passed, characterized by great leaps forward and discoveries. We will learn how space missions are designed, from concept to execution, based on the professional experience of the lecturer and numerous examples of spacecraft, including unique hardware demonstrations by startups of the Silicon Valley. We will study the essentials of systems engineering as applicable to a variety of mission types, for communication, navigation, science, commercial, and military applications. We will explore the various elements of a space mission, including the spacecraft, ground, and launch segments with their functionalities. Special emphasis will be given to the design cycle, to understand how spacecraft are born, from the stakeholders' needs, through analysis, synthesis, all the way to their integration and validation. We will compare the current designs with those employed in the early days of the space age, and show the importance of economics in the development of spacecraft. Finally, we will brainstorm startup ideas and apply the concepts learned to a notional space mission design as a team.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; D'Amico, S. (PI)

AA 141: Atmospheric Flight

From people's initial dreams and theories of flight to future design problems, this class introduces students to flight in the atmosphere and the multidisciplinary challenges of aircraft design. We will discuss how new approaches to airplane propulsion, structures, autonomy, and aerodynamics can lead to environmentally sustainable future transportation, supersonic flight, and personal air vehicles. We will look at how local companies are developing autonomous aircraft, inspired by natural flyers, to systems that will provide ubiquitous internet access flying at twice the altitude of airliners.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kroo, I. (PI)

AA 149: Operation of Aerospace Systems

This course provides a connection with the products of aerospace design through the use of tours, guest speakers, flight simulation, and hands-on exposure to systems used by pilots and space mission operators. We discuss real-world experiences with operators of spacecraft and launch vehicles, and we hear from pilots of manned and unmanned aircraft. Skills required to operate systems in the past, present, and future are addressed. Students will also develop an appreciation of the effects of human factors on aviation safety and the importance of space situational awareness. Anticipated tours include an air traffic control facility and a spacecraft operations center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Barrows, A. (PI)

AA 190: Directed Research and Writing in Aero/Astro

For undergraduates. Experimental or theoretical work under faculty direction, and emphasizing development of research and communication skills. Written report(s) and letter grade required; if this is not appropriate, enroll in 199. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics, involving one of the graduate research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of student services manager and instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AA 210A: Fundamentals of Compressible Flow

Topics: development of the three-dimensional, non-steady, field equations for describing the motion of a viscous, compressible fluid; differential and integral forms of the equations; constitutive equations for a compressible fluid; the entropy equation; compressible boundary layers; area-averaged equations for one-dimensional steady flow; shock waves; channel flow with heat addition and friction; flow in nozzles and inlets; oblique shock waves; Prandtl-Meyer expansion; unsteady one-dimensional flow; the shock tube; small disturbance theory; acoustics in one-dimension; steady flow in two-dimensions; potential flow; linearized potential flow; lift and drag of thin airfoils. Prerequisites: undergraduate background in fluid mechanics and thermodynamics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Cantwell, B. (PI)

AA 212: Advanced Feedback Control Design

Analysis and design techniques for multivariable feedback systems. State-space concepts, observability, controllability, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, stability, and canonical representations. Approaches for robust feedback control design, chiefly H2, H-infinity, and mu-synthesis. System identification and adaptive control design. Use of computer-aided design with MATLAB. Prerequisite: ENGR 105, ENGR 205. Recommended: Linear algebra (EE 263 or equivalent).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schwager, M. (PI)

AA 214A: Numerical Methods in Engineering and Applied Sciences (CME 207, GEOPHYS 217)

Scientific computing and numerical analysis for physical sciences and engineering. Advanced version of CME206 that, apart from CME206 material, includes nonlinear PDEs, multidimensional interpolation and integration and an extended discussion of stability for initial boundary value problems. Recommended for students who have some prior numerical analysis experience. Topics include: 1D and multi-D interpolation, numerical integration in 1D and multi-D including adaptive quadrature, numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) including stability, numerical solutions of 1D and multi-D linear and nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) including concepts of stability and accuracy. Prerequisites: linear algebra, introductory numerical analysis (CME 108 or equivalent).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 228: Decision Making under Uncertainty (CS 238)

This course is designed to increase awareness and appreciation for why uncertainty matters, particularly for aerospace applications. Introduces decision making under uncertainty from a computational perspective and provides an overview of the necessary tools for building autonomous and decision-support systems. Following an introduction to probabilistic models and decision theory, the course will cover computational methods for solving decision problems with stochastic dynamics, model uncertainty, and imperfect state information. Topics include: Bayesian networks, influence diagrams, dynamic programming, reinforcement learning, and partially observable Markov decision processes. Applications cover: air traffic control, aviation surveillance systems, autonomous vehicles, and robotic planetary exploration. Prerequisites: basic probability and fluency in a high-level programming language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kochenderfer, M. (PI)

AA 236A: Spacecraft Design

The design of unmanned spacecraft and spacecraft subsystems emphasizing identification of design drivers and current design methods. Topics: spacecraft configuration design, mechanical design, structure and thermal subsystem design, attitude control, electric power, command and telemetry, and design integration and operations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Manchester, Z. (PI)

AA 240: Analysis of Structures

Analyses of solid and thin walled section beams, trusses, frames, rings, monocoque and semimonocoque structures. Determination of stresses, strains, and deformations, and failure in structures; structural stability and buckling; material behavior: plasticity and fracture. Emphasis on energy methods and introduction of finite element methods. Prerequisite: ENGR 14 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chang, F. (PI)

AA 242A: Classical Dynamics

Accelerating and rotating reference frames. Kinematics of rigid body motion; Euler angles, direction cosines. D'Alembert's principle, equations of motion. Inertia properties of rigid bodies. Dynamics of coupled rigid bodies. Lagrange's equations and their use. Dynamic behavior, stability, and small departures from equilibrium. Prerequisite: ENGR 15 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Close, S. (PI)

AA 248E: Aerial Robot Design (ME 171E, ME 271E)

(Graduate students only enroll in ME 271e or AA 248e) A result-focused introduction to the design of winged aerial robots capable of vertical takeoff and landing for a wide range of applications. Students will learn how to ideate specific aerial robot applications and make an appropriate design from scratch that meets mission requirements. Design skill outcomes include: robot need identification based on mission requirements; system ideation and sizing; making design performance tradeoffs; aerodynamic wing design; CAD assembly; communicating the design and its application. The hands-on lab experience includes prototyping the aerial robot mission, to inform system design, by building and flying quadcopters. Prerequisites: intro level undergraduate fluid mechanics or aerodynamics (e.g. ME 70 or AA 100) or equivalent; Intro level undergraduate electronics or Arduino experience; MATLAB experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AA 289: Robotics and Autonomous Systems Seminar

Seminar talks by researchers and industry professionals on topics related to modern robotics and autonomous systems. Broadly, talks will cover robotic design, perception and navigation, planning and control, and learning for complex robotic systems. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pavone, M. (PI)

AA 290: Problems in Aero/Astro

(Undergraduates register for 190 or 199.) Experimental, theoretical, or computational investigation. Students may work in any field of special interest. This course is designed to develop students' understanding of what a research problem is and the skills needed to successfully approach and conduct research. Register for section belonging to your research supervisor. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 291: Practical Training

Educational opportunities in high-technology research and development labs in aerospace and related industries. Internship integrated into a student's academic program. Research report outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results, and any follow-on projects. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own employment and should see department student services manager before enrolling. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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