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HISTORY 201: Introduction to Public History and Public Service (AFRICAAM 102, CSRE 201, HISTORY 301)

Gateway course for the History and Public Service interdisciplinary track. Topics include the production, presentation, and practice of public history through narratives, exhibits, web sites, and events in museums, historical sites, parks, and public service settings in nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and educational institutions. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McKibben, C. (PI)

HISTORY 201A: The Global Drug Wars (HISTORY 301A)

Explores the global story of the struggle over drugs from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include the history of the opium wars in China, controversies over wine and tobacco in Iran, narco-trafficking and civil war in Lebanon, the Afghan 'narco-state,' Andean cocaine as a global commodity, the politics of U.S.- Mexico drug trafficking, incarceration, drugs, and race in the U.S., and the globalization of the American 'war on drugs.'
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 202: International History and International Relations Theory (HISTORY 306E, POLISCI 216E, POLISCI 316)

The relationship between history and political science as disciplines. Sources include studies by historians and political scientists on topics such as the origins of WW I, the role of nuclear weapons in international politics, the end of the Cold War, nongovernmental organizations in international relations, and change and continuity in the international system.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Holloway, D. (PI)

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 203C: History of Ignorance

Scholars pay a lot of attention to knowledge--how it arises and impacts society--but much less attention has been given to ignorance, even though its impacts are equally profound. Here we explore the political history of ignorance, through case studies including: corporate denials of harms from particular products (tobacco, asbestos), climate change denialism, and creationist rejections of Darwinian evolution. Students will be expected to produce a research paper tracing the origins and impact of a particular form of ignorance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 203K: Trauma and History: Intergenerational suffering and collective healing

This course will examine trauma as a historical process, following the intergenerational impacts of history's darker dramas, analyzing collective strategies for coping and healing after trauma, and asking whether we can speak of "traumatized societies." Readings for graduate students will include Ben Shephard's A War of Nerves, Didier Fassin and Richard Rechtman's The Empire of Trauma, and selections from Yael Danieli, ed., Intergenerational Handbook of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma. Colloquium will be discussion-oriented, but will also include guest discussants from around the world. The course will culminate in a conference to be held at Stanford, June 4-6: "Soul Wounds: Trauma and Healing Across Generations." Undergraduate requirements for 1 credit: Attend weekly "Mind, Body, and Culture" workshop and first hour of Wednesday morning discussion, attend some part of conference on June 4-6. Graduate requirements for 4-5 credits: Attend workshop, read weekly, discussion on Wednesday mornings, write a paper and if desired present at conference.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 204: What is History?

An introduction to the discipline of history, designed for current or prospective History majors. Focusing on methods and theories of historical inquiry, students will learn how historians frame problems, collect and analyze evidence, and contribute to on-going debates. Through a series of case studies or exemplary works of historical study, the course will also explore different genres of historical writing (such as narrative, biography, social history) and different methodological approaches to history (such as Annales school, microhistory, and cultural history).
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 204E: Totalitarianism (HISTORY 307E)

Modern revolutionary and totalitarian politics. Sources include monographs on the medieval, Reformation, French Revolutionary, and Great War eras. Topics: the essence of modern ideology, the concept of the body national, state terror, charismatic leadership, gender assignments, private and public spheres, and identities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 204G: War and Society (HISTORY 304G)

How Western societies and cultures have responded to modern warfare. The relationship between its destructive capacity and effects on those who produce, are subject to, and must come to terms with its aftermath. Literary representations of WW I; destructive psychological effects of modern warfare including those who take pleasure in killing; changes in relations between the genders; consequences of genocidal ideology and racial prejudice; the theory of just war and its practical implementation; and how wars are commemorated.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 205F: Digital History: Concepts, Methods, Problems

Students will study the development of the relationship between the discipline of history and computing tools through a combination of theoretical and hands-on activities, and readings. Students will read leading critical works, examine seminal digital projects, and examine the works of leading digital humanities scholars. The course will introduce students to concepts and methods within digital history, including text analysis, spatial history, data visualization, and digital scholarship. The end product of the course will be a born-digital scholarly product.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Heppler, J. (PI)

HISTORY 205G: Creative Political Thinking: From Machiavelli to Madison (HISTORY 305G, POLISCI 235J, POLISCI 335J)

How can we account for creativity and innovation in political thinking? Are these qualities simply a product of political expediency and rhetorical urgency, or do they also depend on qualities of mind and historical contingencies that have to be studied individually? This class will explore these questions with three noteworthy cases: Niccolo Machiavelli, John Locke, and James Madison. Extensive reading in both primary writings and secondary sources.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rakove, J. (PI)

HISTORY 207C: The Global Early Modern (HISTORY 307C)

In what sense can we speak of "globalization" before modernity? What are the characteristics and origins of the economic system we know as "capitalism"? When and why did European economies begin to diverge from those of other Eurasian societies? With these big questions in mind, the primary focus will be on the history of Europe and European empires, but substantial readings deal with other parts of the world, particularly China and the Indian Ocean.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 208B: Women Activists' Response to War (FEMGEN 208B, HISTORY 308B)

Theoretical issues, historical origins, changing forms of women's activism in response to war throughout the 20th century, and contemporary cases, such as the Russian Committee of Soldiers Mothers, Bosnian Mothers of Srebrenica, Serbian Women in Black, and the American Cindy Sheehan. Focus is on the U.S. and Eastern Europe, with attention to Israel, England, and Argentina.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 209C: Liberalism and Violence (HISTORY 309C)

Does LIberalism have a theory of violence? What does modern political thought, in privileging humanity and rights, share with "terrorists" and "rogue states?" How is liberalism transformed by the use of religion and death for political ends? We read key thinkers of modern life- Adorno, Arendt, Agamben, Benjamin, Derrida, Fanon, Foucault, Gandhi, Heidegger, and Schmitt- to interrogate the relationship between religion, sacrifice, and democracy. At the center are connections between war and modern life, and between violence and non-violence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 212: Knights, Monks, and Nobles: Masculinity in the Middle Ages (HISTORY 312)

This course considers masculinity as historically and culturally contingent, focusing on the experiences and representations of medieval men as heroes, eunuchs, fathers, priests, husbands, boys, and fighting men. Recognizing that the lives of men, like those of women, were governed by gendered rules and expectations, we will explore a wide range of medieval masculinities, paying close attention to the processes by which manhood could be achieved (e.g. martial, spiritual, sexual), and to competing versions of manliness, from the warrior hero of the early middle ages to the suffering Christ of late medieval religion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Griffiths, F. (PI)

HISTORY 222: Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe and Russia

Explores criminal law in early modern Europe and Russia, ca 1500-1800, in law and in practice. Engages debates about use of exemplary public executions as tactic of governance, and about gradual decline in "violence" in Europe over this time. Explores practice of accusatory and inquisitory judicial procedures, judicial torture, forms of punishment, concepts of justice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 224C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HISTORY 228: Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II (HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 282, JEWISHST 382)

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 230F: Surveillance in Modern Europe (HISTORY 330F)

We will investigate the role of surveillance in modern societies -- the motives, pressures, and consequences of informal and formal systems of control from the French Revolution to the present day. Students will encounter a variety of sources and situations, analyzing the tensions between social stability and individual pursuits, and the circumstances under which these tensions can lead to state repression and violence.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sheffer, E. (PI)

HISTORY 231E: Paper, Printing, and Digital Revolutions: Transformations of the Book (HISTORY 331E)

What is a book? This seminar explores the conceptual implications of approximately two millennia of transformations in the physical and material properties of books. How have the meaning and authority we assign the written word changed as technologies of book production and dissemination have evolved, and how have they remained continuous? Topics covered include the rise of the medieval manuscript codex, the emergence of print culture in early modern Europe, and current debates over the nature of text in the digital age.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Clark, F. (PI)

HISTORY 232F: The Scientific Revolution

Was there a scientific revolution in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? How did modern science emerge as a distinctive kind of knowledge and practices? Explores changing ideas of nature and knowledge during the age of Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Bacon, and Newton. Examines the contexts in which western science emerged, issues of scientific methodology (e.g. induction, deduction, probability, and the rise of experimentation), the development of scientific institutions, and the emergence of the scientist as a historical figure.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Clark, F. (PI)

HISTORY 233C: Two British Revolutions (HISTORY 333C)

Current scholarship on Britain,1640-1700, focusing on political and religious history. Topics include: causes and consequences of the English civil war and revolution; rise and fall of revolutionary Puritanism; the Restoration; popular politics in the late 17th century; changing contours of religious life; the crisis leading to the Glorious Revolution; and the new order that emerged after the deposing of James II.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 234: The Enlightenment (DLCL 324, HISTORY 334, HISTORY 432A, HUMNTIES 324)

The Enlightenment as a philosophical, literary, and political movement. Themes include the nature and limits of philosophy, the grounds for critical intellectual engagement, the institution of society and the public, and freedom, equality and human progress. Authors include Voltaire, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Hume, Diderot, and Condorcet.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Baker, K. (PI)

HISTORY 236B: Hobbes to Habermas: The Idea of Society in Modern Thought (HISTORY 336B)

Classic texts in social theory from the seventeenth century to the present. Readings include Locke, Smith, Hegel, Comte, and Durkheim, and Weber.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Baker, K. (PI)

HISTORY 237K: Speed and Power in Twentieth-Century Europe (HISTORY 337K)

Europeans living in the 20th century witnessed an unprecedented (and, to many observers, frightening) acceleration in the pace of everyday life, wrought by the introduction of a host of new travel technologies. Focusing on the metropolises of Europe, this seminar will explore the various ways that trains, planes, and automobiles have shaped modern urban life. We'll also look at how 20th-century artists and writers have treated the interrelated themes of speed and power in their work.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Braude, M. (PI)

HISTORY 238E: European Legal History (HISTORY 338E)

(Same as LAW 441.) This seminar will explore major topics in European legal history from ancient Rome through the present: Roman law, canon law, feudalism, sixteenth- and seventeenth-century constitutionalism, modern natural law, the age of absolutism and the rise of the centralized, administrative state, the structure of Old Regime law and society and the radical changes brought about by revolution, the German historical school of jurisprudence, and the rise of the European Union and a new culture of international human rights. In exploring these topics, we will focus on certain core, recurring themes that continue profoundly to shape the world in which we live. These include the sources and nature of law (positive law vs. custom), the relationship between law and society, and the relationship between law and history. Classroom discussion will focus on selected primary- and secondary-source texts that we will read as a group. nnThis course is cross-listed with LAW441. The course will be limited to 12 SLS students with 10 additional slots held for students enrolling in HISTORY338E.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kessler, A. (PI)

HISTORY 240: The History of Evolution (HISTORY 340)

This course examines the history of evolutionary biology from its emergence around the middle of the eighteenth century. We will consider the continual engagement of evolutionary theories of life with a larger, transforming context: philosophical, political, social, economic, institutional, aesthetic, artistic, literary. Our goal will be to achieve a historical rich and nuanced understanding of how evolutionary thinking about life has developed to its current form.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 243G: Tobacco and Health in World History (HISTORY 343G)

Cigarettes are the world's leading cause of death--but how did we come into this world, where 6 trillion cigarettes are smoked every year? Here we explore the political, cultural, and technological origins of the cigarette and cigarette epidemic, using the tobacco industry's 80 million pages of secret documents. Topics include the history of cigarette advertising and cigarette design, the role of the tobacco industry in fomenting climate change denial, and questions raised by the testimony of experts in court.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 244: Egyptomania! The Allure of Ancient Egypt Over the Past 3,500 Years (CLASSICS 87)

Why does Egypt fascinate us? From Napoleon¿s invasion to Katy Perry¿s latest music video, we have interpreted ancient Egyptian history and mythology for centuries; in fact, this obsession dates back to the Egyptians themselves. This seminar explores Egyptomania from the Pharaonic period to the 20th century. Topics include: ancient Egypt, Greek historians, medieval Arabic scholars, hieroglyphic decipherment, 19th century travel, 20th century pop culture, and how historians have interpreted this past over the centuries.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Austin, A. (PI)

HISTORY 245: Violence and Identity in the African Great Lakes Region

Untangles current crises through exploring debates on migration, autochthony, ethnicity and nationalism from the pre-colonial era to the present. While the majority of the course focuses on the region's `center' (Rwanda, Burundi and the Democratic Republic of the Congo), we will also examine continuities and differences within the larger geographic region. Topics include the historical roots and perspectives that inform genocide, gender based violence, mineral exploitation, reconciliation, development and controversies around homosexuality in Uganda and the wider region.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rosenthal, J. (PI)

HISTORY 246E: Refugees and the Making of the Modern World: 1945-Present (HISTORY 346E)

Following the mass popular displacements of WWII, a group of diplomats came together to create the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees-- the bases of the international refugee regime that has endured to the present. We will explore the processes that led to the creation of the modern international refugee regime, and how international refugee law has evolved in response to conflicts and emergencies "on the ground." Throughout, we will question the category of the "refugee," and interrogate the methods by which refugees, as individuals and as groups, have sought to control and alter their positions under national and international authorities. Topics will include notions of migration and asylum, the creation and evolution of international refugee law, refugees, stateless people, economic migrants, and decolonization. We will have case studies of post-WWII European, Palestinian, Thai, Ethiopian, Haitian, and Cuban "refugees," among others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rosenthal, J. (PI)

HISTORY 247: Violence in African History: Conflict and Healing in sub-Saharan Africa (HISTORY 347)

This course questions what constitutes "violence" in African history, and why it occurred when it did. We will examine the subtleties of "violence" in African history, which have sometimes led to conflicts, and sometimes to rich strategies of healing and improvisation. These include ecological crises, domestic violence, corruption, economic exploitation, and demographic crises (including urbanization and diseases such as HIV-AIDS). While we begin by examining ideas about conflict in pre-colonial Africa, the course focuses on the colonial and post-colonial eras in African history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rosenthal, J. (PI)

HISTORY 250E: Taxing America: From the Puritans to Prop. 13

Taxes have shaped American society and politics since before the Revolution. And they've been extremely controversial just as long. In this course we'll try to understand American society and government by looking at the politics of taxation from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Topics include the legitimacy of taxation, the constitution, economic development, inequality, gender, and race.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; duRivage, J. (PI)

HISTORY 254: Popular Culture and American Nature

Despite John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson, it is arguable that the Disney studios have more to do with molding popular attitudes toward the natural world than politicians, ecologists, and activists. Disney as the central figure in the 20th-century American creation of nature. How Disney, the products of his studio, and other primary and secondary texts see environmentalism, science, popular culture, and their interrelationships.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; White, R. (PI)

HISTORY 254G: The Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution

Why did Britain's North American colonies declare independence from an empire they had long revered? What did the American Revolution mean for the people who experienced it? In this course we will explore the explosive origins of the American republic. Topics: revolutionary ideology, empire, the federal constitution, slavery, social conflict, and the international consequences of the American Revolution.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; duRivage, J. (PI)

HISTORY 256: America- China Relations (AMSTUD 256, HISTORY 356)

The history of turbulent relations, military conflict, and cultural clashes between the U.S. and China, and the implications for the domestic lives of these increasingly interconnected countries. Diplomatic, political, social, cultural, and military themes from early contact to the recent past.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chang, G. (PI)

HISTORY 258: Topics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America (AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores recent historical interpretations of the history of sexuality, with a focus on sexual violence. The readings cover changing definitions and laws, cultural representations, and the role of gender, race, and age in the construction of rape and other forms of sexual violence. Topics include slavery; incest, seduction, and statutory rape reform; the racialization of rape and the anti-lynching movement; street harassment; men and boys as victims; war and conquest; and feminist responses to rape.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 260: California's Minority-Majority Cities (CSRE 260)

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McKibben, C. (PI)

HISTORY 264G: Madness in American Society: The Social History of Mental Illness in the United States

(Formerly HPS 158.) Explores the variety of meanings of mental illness in the past, and the diagnostic, therapeutic, cultural and policy challenges historically posed by mental illness. Focus is on the U.S. but is not limited to it. How has mental illness been defined in history? How has the mind been medicalized and managed? Topics include the rise of institutions for the mentally ill, the growth of the psychiatric profession and the relationship between psychiatry, deviance and anti-psychiatry,and gender and psychiatric norms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Horn, M. (PI)

HISTORY 265: Writing Asian American History (AMSTUD 265, ASNAMST 265, HISTORY 365)

Recent scholarship in Asian American history, with attention to methodologies and sources. Topics: racial ideologies, gender, transnationalism, culture, and Asian American art history. Primary research paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chang, G. (PI)

HISTORY 272E: Theories of Citizenship and Sovereignty in a Transnational Context (AMSTUD 272E, CHILATST 172, CSRE 172H, FEMGEN 272E, HISTORY 372E)

This course explores the multiple meanings of citizenship and the ways in which they change when examined using different geographic scales (from the local to the transnational). The course will pair theoretical readings on citizenship with case studies that focus on North America. Topics include: definitions of citizenship; the interrelation of ideas of citizenship with those of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality; the relationship between sovereignty and territoriality; human and civil rights; and immigration.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Minian Andjel, A. (PI)

HISTORY 274: Mexico Since 1876: History of a "Failed State"?

This course is an introduction to the history and diverse peoples of modern Mexico from 1876 to the present. Through discussions, primary and secondary readings, short documentaries, and written assignments, students will critically explore and analyze the multiplicity of historical processes, events and trends that shaped and were shaped by Mexicans over the course of a century. The course will cover some of the social and political dimensions of rural social change, urbanization and industrialization, technological innovation and misuse, environmental degradation and conservation, education, ideology, culture and media, migration, and the drug trade.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 274E: Urban Poverty and Inequality in Latin America

We examine historical issues of social inequality, poverty, crime, industrialization, globalization, and environment in major Latin American cities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pineda, Y. (PI)

HISTORY 282F: History of Modern Turkey

Social, political and cultural history of Modern Turkey from the last decades of the Ottoman Empire in the late 19th century until Today. Themes include transformation from a multi-national empire to a national republic; Islam, secularism and radical modernism; military, bureaucracy and democratic experience; economic development, underdevelopment and class; Istanbul, Ankara and provincial Turkey; socialism, conservatism(s), and Kurdish challenge; Turkey in Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia; gender, sexuality and family; recent political crises.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rodrigue, A. (PI)

HISTORY 283: The New Global Economy, Oil and Origins of the Arab Spring (HISTORY 383)

This class uses the methods of political economy to study the trajectory of global capitalism from the end of World War II to the current phase of neoliberal globalization. The argument is that the role of oil, and its primary repository " the Middle East " has been central in the global capitalist order and that neoliberalism and the oil economy are closely linked to the eruption of the Arab uprisings of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beinin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 284F: Empires, Markets and Networks: Early Modern Islamic World and Beyond, 1500-1800 (HISTORY 384F)

Focuses on political regimes, economic interactions and sociocultural formations in the early modern Balkans and Middle East to Central and South Asia. Topics include complex political systems of the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal empires; experiences of various Muslim, Christian, Jewish and Hindu, as well as urban, rural and nomadic communities; consolidation of transregional commerce and cultural exchange; incorporation of the Islamic world in the global economy; transimperial networks of the Muslim and Non-Muslim merchants, scholars and sufis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yaycioglu, A. (PI)

HISTORY 286: Jews Among Muslims in Modern Times (HISTORY 386, JEWISHST 286, JEWISHST 386)

The history of Jewish communities in the lands of Islam and their relations with the surrounding Muslim populations from the time of Muhammad to the 20th century. Topics: the place of Jews in Muslim societies, Jewish communal life, variation in the experience of communities in different Muslim lands, the impact of the West in the Modern period, the rise of nationalisms, and the end of Jewish life in Muslim countries.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rodrigue, A. (PI)

HISTORY 292D: Japan in Asia, Asia in Japan (HISTORY 392D)

How Japan and Asia mutually shaped each other in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Focus is on Japanese imperialism in Asia and its postwar legacies. Topics include: pan-Asianism and orientalism; colonial modernization in Korea and Taiwan; collaboration and resistance; popular imperialism in Manchuria; total war and empire; comfort women and the politics of apology; the issue of resident Koreans; and economic and cultural integration of postwar Asia.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 292F: Culture and Religions in Korean History (HISTORY 392F)

This colloquium explores the major themes of Korean history before 1800 and the role of culture and religions in shaping the everyday life of Chosôn-dynasty Koreans. Themes include the aristocracy and military in the Koryô dynasty, Buddhism and Confucianism in the making of Chosôn Korea, kingship and court culture, slavery and women, family and rituals, death and punishment, and the Korean alphabet (Hangûl) and print culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Moon, Y. (PI)

HISTORY 293B: Queer History in Comparative Perspective (FEMGEN 293B, FEMGEN 393B, HISTORY 393B)

Comparative history of homoerotic desire, relations, and identity through scholarship on different historical periods and parts of the world: the classical Mediterranean, early modern European cities, late imperial and modern China, Tokugawa and modern Japan, and the U.S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sommer, M. (PI)

HISTORY 293D: Global Intellectual History (HISTORY 393D)

Ideas have circulated globally for millennia but relatively recently have thinkers begun to conceptualize the global. Like "humanity" and "universalism," or what Marx called "international," the "global" too has complex genealogies. It is associated, often simultaneously, with empire and freedom, war and equality, commitment and treason, piracy and justice, homelessness and cosmopolitanism. Working with key 20th century texts from Italy, Britain, India, Israel, Palestine, Germany, France, and Algeria, course explores how thinking "globally" impacts the very foundations of modern political thought.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 293E: Female Divinities in China (HISTORY 393E, RELIGST 257X, RELIGST 357X)

This course examines the fundamental role of powerful goddesses in Chinese religion. It covers the entire range of imperial history and down to the present. It will look at, among other questions, what roles goddesses played in the spirit world, how this is related to the roles of human women, and why a civilization that excluded women from the public sphere granted them a dominant place, in the religious sphere. It is based entirely on readings in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 295F: Race and Ethnicity in East Asia (ASNAMST 295F, HISTORY 395F)

Intensive exploration of major issues in the history of race and ethnicity in China, Japan, and Korea from the early modern period to the present day.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 299X: Preparing for International Field Work: Public Service or Research (HISTORY 399A)

Open to students in all classes, those planning internships abroad and those planning research, from juniors with honors theses and sophomores with Chappell Lougee grants to freshmen thinking ahead. Introduces resources on campus for planning international research and service. Raises issues that need to be considered in advance of going abroad: ethical concerns, Human Subjects Protocol, networking, personal safety and gender issues, confronting cultural differences. Exposes students to research methods: case studies, interviewing, working in foreign libraries and archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 346: The Dynamics of Change in Africa (AFRICAST 301A, POLISCI 246P, POLISCI 346P)

Crossdisciplinary colloquium; required for the M.A. degree in African Studies. Open to advanced undergraduates and PhD students. Addresses critical issues including patterns of economic collapse and recovery; political change and democratization; and political violence, civil war, and genocide. Focus on cross-cutting issues including the impact of colonialism; the role of religion, ethnicity, and inequality; and Africa's engagement with globalization.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 152: History of American Law (HISTORY 352B)

(Same as LAW 318.) Modern history of American law, legal thought, legal institutions and the legal profession. Topics include law and regulation of corporate organizations and labor relations in the age of enterprise, law of race relations in the South and North, development of classical legalism, critiques of classical legalism, modern administrative state, organized legal profession, New Deal legal thought and legislation, legal order of the 50s, expansion of enterprise liability, civil rights movements from 1940, rights revolution of the Warren Court and Great Society.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 203D: The Holocaust in Recent Memory: Conflicts - Commemorations - Challenges (HISTORY 303D, JEWISHST 283D, JEWISHST 383D)

This course offers an in-depth approach to the study of the Holocaust as a historical point of reference for European memory, or for the memory cultures of European nations, where the international context in particular the USA and Israel will also be taken into consideration. The starting point is the transformations in Holocaust memory: after 1945, in the era of European postwar myths, the Holocaust was on the periphery of historical thinking, of scholarly and public interest. Today the Holocaust is acknowledged as a 'break in civilization', a watershed event in human history. This approach has only evolved since the 1980s.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Uhl, H. (PI)

HISTORY 216: Women and the Book: Scribes, Artists, and Readers from Late Antiquity through the Fourteenth Century (ARTHIST 206H, FEMGEN 216, HISTORY 316)

This course examines the cultural worlds of medieval women through particular attention to the books that they owned, commissioned, and created. Beginning with the earliest Christian centuries, the course proceeds chronologically, charting women¿s book ownership, scribal and artistic activity, and patronage from Late Antiquity through the fourteenth century. In addition to examining specific manuscripts (in facsimile, or digitally), we will consider ancillary questions to do with women¿s authorship, education and literacy, reading patterns, devotional practices, and visual traditions and representation.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Griffiths, F. (PI)

HISTORY 217S: Minorities In Medieval Europe (RELIGST 217X)

This course examines attitudes towards outsider groups within medieval society and the treatment of these groups by medieval Christians. Heretics, Jews, Muslims, homosexuals, prostitutes and usurers occupied ambivalent and at time dangerous positions within a society that increasingly defined itself as Christian. Differences in the treatment of these various 'outcast' groups, their depiction in art, their legal segregation, and their presumed association with demonic activity are addressed through discussion, and readings from primary and secondary source material.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Griffiths, F. (PI)

HISTORY 232B: Heretics, Prostitutes and Merchants: The Venetian Empire (ITALIAN 232B)

Between 1200-1600, Venice created a powerful empire at the boundary between East and West that controlled much of the Mediterranean, with a merchant society that allowed social groups, religions, and ethnicities to coexist. Topics include the features of Venetian society, the relationship between center and periphery, order and disorder, orthodoxy and heresy, the role of politics, art, and culture in the Venetian Renaissance, and the empire's decline as a political power and reinvention as a tourist site and living museum.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 235: The Renaissance of War: Politics, Technology, and War in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy

The dynamic societies of the Italian Peninsula of the 14th to 16th centuries "prosperous, astonishingly creative, politically fractious, and endemically violent" produced sweeping, deeply consequential changes. Among these were new developments in the theory and practice of war, politics, and diplomacy that laid the foundations for the modern state system and European military power. The class covers: new diplomatic practice; the Military Revolution; state-building; war finance; court culture; and the intersection of these with the shimmering brilliance of Renaissance culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brege, B. (PI)

HISTORY 235C: Readings in the Supernatural (HISTORY 335C)

Class will read and discuss a selection of monographs, scholarly essays, and primary sources on the rich supernatural world of early modern Europe. We will discuss how fairies, werewolves, nightmares, and trolls all became witches, how the binary of angels and demons figured in European thought, and how the marginalized imaginary was reconstituted in theatre and fiction.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 236F: The End of the World As They Knew It: Culture, Caf├ęs, and Crisis in Europe, 1880-1918 (HISTORY 336F)

The years stretching from roughly 1880 to end of the First World War were marked by profound social upheaval and an intense burst of creativity. This seminar will focus on the major cultural movements and big ideas of the period. Topics covered include the rise of mass culture and cinema, the origins of psychoanalysis, anti-Semitism and Zionism, new anxieties about sexuality and the ¿New Woman,¿ anarchism, decadence, degeneration, and Dada ¿ with cameos from Bernhardt, Freud, Klimt, Nietzsche, Toulouse-Lautrec, Wilde, Zola, and other luminaries of the age.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Braude, M. (PI)

HISTORY 238G: Ethnography of the Late Middle Ages: Social history and popular culture in the age of the plague (HISTORY 338G)

During the late Middle Ages, as Europe was recovering from the devastation of the Black Death, political reorganization contributed to a burst of archival documentation that allows historians richly detailed glimpses of societies in transition. We will be reading selected scholarly articles and monographs covering such topics as persecution, prechristian cultural remnants, folk theologies, festival cultures, peasant revolts, heresy, and the advent of the diabolic witch.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 254D: Law, Slavery, and Race (AFRICAAM 254D, CSRE 154D, HISTORY 354)

(Same as LAW 747.) This course will explore the interaction of law, slavery and race in the United States, as well as from a comparative perspective. We will read original documents, including excerpts of trial transcripts, appellate opinions, treatises, codes, and first-person narratives. We will study the way law, politics and culture interacted to shape the institution of slavery and the development of modern conceptions of race. Course lectures and discussions will focus on questions such as: Did different legal regimes (Spanish, French, British) foster different systems of race and slavery in the Americas? How did/does law work "on the ground" to shape the production of racial hierarchy and creation of racial identities? In what ways did slavery influence the U.S. Constitution? How has race shaped citizenship in the U.S., and how can we compare it to other constitutional regimes? The course will begin with the origins of New World slavery, race and racism, and move chronologically to the present day.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gross, A. (PI)

HISTORY 267E: Martin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy (AFRICAAM 267E, AMSTUD 267E)

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's King Research and Education Institute, this course will provide a general introduction to King's life, visionary ideas, and historical significance. In addition to lectures and discussions, the course will include presentations of documentaries such as Eyes on the Prize. Students will be expected to read the required texts, participate in class discussions, and submit a research paper or an audio-visual project developed in consultation with the professor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 271: Mexicans in the United States (AMSTUD 271, CHILATST 171, CSRE 171H)

This course explores the lives and experiences of Mexicans living in the United States, from 1848 to the present. Themes and topics include: the legacies of colonialism, the Mexican-American War, transnational migration, the effects of economic stratification, race and racialization, and the impact of sexual and gender ideologies on the lives of Mexicans residing north of the border.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Minian Andjel, A. (PI)

HISTORY 279: Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-2014 (HISTORY 379)

The newly independent nations of Latin America began the 19th century with economies roughly equal to the U.S. and Canada. What explains the economic gap that developed since 1800? Why are some Latin American nations rich and others poor and how have societies changed over time? Marxist, dependency, neoclassical, and institutionalist interpretive frameworks are explored. The effects of globalization on Latin American economic growth, autonomy, and potential for social justice are examined and debated.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Frank, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 294D: Manchuria: Cradle of Conflict, Cockpit of Asia (HISTORY 394D)

How did Manchuria become Chinese? This course utilizes the dual waves of early twentieth-century writings and a wide array of recent scholarship dealing with Manchuria to explore the formation of nation-states out of the Qing and Japanese empires in Northeast Asia through the lenses of opium, migration, cities, warlords, and memoir. This course will be of interest to students concerned with developing transcultural understandings of Northeast Asian history.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chen, C. (PI)

HISTORY 299H: Junior Honors Colloquium

Required of junior History majors planning to write a History honors thesis during senior year. Meets four times during the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)
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