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ME 1: Introduction to Mechanical Engineering

This course is intended to be the starting point for Mechanical Engineering majors. It will cover the concepts, engineering methods, and common tools used by mechanical engineers while introducing the students to a few interesting devices. We will discuss how each device was conceived, design challenges that arose, application of analytical tools to the design, and production methods. Main class sections will include lectures, demonstrations, and in-class group exercises. Lab sections will develop specific skills in freehand sketching and computational modeling of engineering systems. Prerequisites: Physics: Mechanics, and first quarter Calculus.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 23N: Soft Robots for Humanity

While traditional robotic manipulators are constructed from rigid links and simple joints, a new generation of robotic devices are soft, using flexible, deformable materials. Students in this class will get hands-on experience building soft robots using various materials, actuators, and programming to create robots that perform different tasks. Through this process, students will gain an appreciation for the capabilities and limitations of bio-inspired systems, use design thinking to create novel robotic solutions, and gain practical interdisciplinary engineering skills.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Okamura, A. (PI)

ME 30: Engineering Thermodynamics

The basic principles of thermodynamics are introduced in this course. Concepts of energy and entropy from elementary considerations of the microscopic nature of matter are discussed. The principles are applied in thermodynamic analyses directed towards understanding the performances of engineering systems. Methods and problems cover socially responsible economic generation and utilization of energy in central power generation plants, solar systems, refrigeration devices, and automobile, jet and gas-turbine engines.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 80: Mechanics of Materials

Mechanics of materials and deformation of structural members. Topics include stress and deformation analysis under axial loading, torsion and bending, column buckling and pressure vessels. Introduction to stress transformation and multiaxial loading. Prerequisite: ENGR 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 101: Visual Thinking

Lecture/lab. Visual thinking and language skills are developed and exercised in the context of solving design problems. Exercises for the mind's eye. Rapid visualization and prototyping with emphasis on fluent and flexible idea production. The relationship between visual thinking and the creative process. Limited enrollment, attendance at first class required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 102: Foundations of Product Realization

Students develop the language and toolset to transform design concepts into tangible models/prototypes that cultivate the emergence of mechanical aptitude. Visual communication tools such as sketching, orthographic projection, and 2D/3D design software are introduced in the context of design and prototyping assignments. Instruction and practice with hand, powered, and digital prototyping tools in the Product Realization Lab support students implementation and iteration of physical project work. Project documentation, reflection, and in-class presentations are opportunities for students to find their design voice and practice sharing it with others.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 103: Product Realization: Design and Making

Students will build on the foundation created in ME102. ME103 includes structured labs in machining, casting, forming and welding; carrying a single project through the entire design process from conceptualization through presentation of a customer ready prototype, creation of a project based portfolio, and an introduction to manufacturing processes.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beach, D. (PI)

ME 104B: Designing Your Life

This course applies the mindsets and innovation principles of design thinking to the "wicked problem" of designing your life and vocation. The course introduces design thinking processes through application: students practice awareness and empathy, define areas of life and work on which hey want to work, ideate about ways to move forward, try small prototypes, and test their assumptions. The course is highly interactive. The course will include brief readings, writing, reflections, and in-class exercises. Expect to practice ideation and prototyping methodologies, decision making practices and to participate in hands on activities in pairs, trios, and small groups. Also includes roleplaying, assigned conversations with off campus professionals, guest speakers, and individual mentoring and coaching. It will conclude with creation of 3 versions of the next 5 years and prototype ideas to begin making those futures a reality. Open to juniors, seniors and 5th year coterms, all majors. All enrolled and waitlisted students should attend class on day 1 for admission. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourlife.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 104S: Designing Your Stanford (EDUC 118S)

DYS uses a Design Thinking approach to help Freshmen and Sophomores learn practical tools and ideas to make the most of their Stanford experience. Topics include the purpose of college, major selection, educational and vocational wayfinding, and innovating college outcomes, explored through the design thinking process. This seminar class incorporates small group discussion, in-class activities, field exercises, personal reflection, and individual coaching. Expect ideation tools, storytelling practices, prototyping to discover more about yourself and possible paths forward. The course concludes with creation of multiple versions of what college might look like and how to make those ideas reality. All enrolled and waitlisted students should attend class on day 1 for admission. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourstanford.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 110: Design Sketching

Freehand sketching, rendering, and design development. Students develop a design sketching portfolio for review by program faculty. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 110B: Digital Design Principles and Applications

Building upon foundation design principles, project-based individual / group exploration and critique facilitates a self-guided learning process, where analytical problem-solving approaches are cultivated through real-time implementation in digital tools. A series of diverse projects are brought together in conjunction with related student project portfolio development. Class Prerequisites: Students must have completed ME110 with high levels of understanding, engagement. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scott, W. (PI)

ME 115A: Introduction to Human Values in Design

An intensive project-based class that introduces the central philosophy of the product design program. Students learn how to use the lens of human needs to innovate at the intersection of technical factors (feasibility), business factors (viability), and human values (desirability). Students work toward mastery of the human-centered design methodology through several real-world, team-based projects. Students gain fluency in designing solutions ranging from physical products, to digital interfaces, to services and experiences. Students are immersed in building their individual and team capacities around core design process and methods, and emerge with a strong foundation in needfinding, synthesis, ideation, rapid prototyping, user testing, iteration, and storytelling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 128: Computer-Aided Product Realization

Students will continue to build understanding of Product Realization processes and techniques concentrating on Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines, materials, tools, and workholding. Students will gain an understanding of CNC in modern manufacturing and alternative methods and tools used in industry. Students will contribute to their professional portfolio by including projects done in class, both individually and in teams. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ME 103 and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Milroy, C. (PI)

ME 131: Heat Transfer

The principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation with examples from the engineering of practical devices and systems. Topics include transient and steady conduction, conduction by extended surfaces, boundary layer theory for forced and natural convection, boiling, heat exchangers, and graybody radiative exchange. Prerequisites: ME70, ME30 (formerly listed at ENGR30). Recommended: intermediate calculus, ordinary differential equations.nnThis course was formerly ME131A. Students who have already taken ME131A should not enroll in this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Majumdar, A. (PI)

ME 132: Intermediate Thermodynamics

A second course in engineering thermodynamics. Review of first and second laws, and the state principle. Extension of property treatment to mixtures. Chemical thermodynamics including chemical equilibrium, combustion, and understanding of chemical potential as a driving force. Elementary electrochemical thermodynamics. Coursework includes both theoretical and applied aspects. Applications include modeling and experiments of propulsion systems (turbojet) and electricity generation (PEM fuel cell). Matlab is used for quantitative modeling of complex energy systems with real properties and performance metrics. Prerequisites: ME30 required, ME70 suggested, ME131 desirable.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Edwards, C. (PI)

ME 161: Dynamic Systems, Vibrations and Control

Modeling, analysis, and measurement of mechanical and electromechanical dynamic systems. Closed form solutions of ordinary differential equations governing the behavior of single and multiple-degree-of-freedom systems. Stability, forcing, resonance, and control system design. Prerequisites: Ordinary differential equations (CME 102 or MATH 53), linear algebra (CME 104 or MATH 53) and dynamics (E 15) are recommended.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Towles, J. (PI)

ME 170A: Mechanical Engineering Design- Integrating Context with Engineering

First course of two-quarter capstone sequence. Working in project teams, design and develop an engineering system addressing a real-world problem in theme area of pressing societal need. Learn and utilize industry development process: first quarter focuses on establishing requirements and narrowing to top concept. Second quarter emphasizes implementation and testing. Learn and apply professional communication skills, assess ethics. Students must also enroll in ME170b; completion of 170b required to earn grade in 170a. Course sequence fulfills ME WIM requirement. Prerequisites: ENGR15, ME80, ME104 (112), ME131, ME123/151. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wood, J. (PI)

ME 171E: Aerial Robot Design (AA 248E, ME 271E)

(Graduate students only enroll in ME 271e or AA 248e) A result-focused introduction to the design of winged aerial robots capable of vertical takeoff and landing for a wide range of applications. Students will learn how to ideate specific aerial robot applications and make an appropriate design from scratch that meets mission requirements. Design skill outcomes include: robot need identification based on mission requirements; system ideation and sizing; making design performance tradeoffs; aerodynamic wing design; CAD assembly; communicating the design and its application. The hands-on lab experience includes prototyping the aerial robot mission, to inform system design, by building and flying quadcopters. Prerequisites: intro level undergraduate fluid mechanics or aerodynamics (e.g. ME 70 or AA 100) or equivalent; Intro level undergraduate electronics or Arduino experience; MATLAB experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lentink, D. (PI)

ME 195A: Food, Design & Technology

Food has been a great source of inspiration for many entrepreneurs and designers. In Silicon Valley, the number of food design solutions has increased tremendously. The goal of this course is to expose students to the landscape of food innovation and design. We will look at food in two different lenses--design and technology. In the first half of the course, students will learn the design thinking process through food. In the next half, students will explore various applications of the design thinking methodology in the real world. Students will do so by actively asking questions, participating in discussions, and engaging in hands-on activities led by industry leaders and experts. Weekly readings will be assigned.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kim, S. (PI); Leifer, L. (PI)

ME 203: Design and Manufacturing

Integrated experience involving need finding, product definition, conceptual design, detail design, prototype manufacture, public presentation of outcomes, archiving and intrepreting the product realization process and its results. Presents an overview of manufacturing processes crucial to the practice of design.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beach, D. (PI)

ME 208: Patent Law and Strategy for Innovators and Entrepreneurs (MS&E 278)

This course teaches the essentials for a startup to build a valuable patent portfolio and avoid a patent infringement lawsuit. Jeffrey Schox, who is the top recommended patent attorney for Y Combinator, built the patent portfolio for Twilio (IPO), Cruise ($1B acquisition), and 300 startups that have collectively raised over $3B in venture capital. This course is equally applicable to EE, CS, and Bioengineering students. For those students who are interested in a career in Patent Law, please note that this course is a prerequisite for ME238 Patent Prosecution.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schox, J. (PI)

ME 216A: Advanced Product Design: Needfinding

Human needs that lead to the conceptualization of future products, environments, systems, and services. Field work in public and private settings; appraisal of personal values; readings on social ethnographic issues; and needfinding for a corporate client. Emphasis is on developing the flexible thinking skills that enable the designer to navigate the future. Prerequisites for undergraduates: ME115A, ME115B and ME203, or consent of the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 218A: Smart Product Design Fundamentals

Lecture/Lab. Team design project series on programmable electromechanical systems design. Topics: transistors as switches, basic digital and analog circuits, operational amplifiers, comparators, software design, state machines, programming in C. Lab fee. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Carryer, E. (PI)

ME 218D: Smart Product Design: Projects

Lecture/lab. Industrially sponsored project is the culmination of the Smart Product Design sequence. Student teams take on an industrial project requiring application and extension of knowledge gained in the prior three quarters, including prototyping of a final solution with hardware, software, and professional documentation and presentation. Lectures extend the students' knowledge of electronic and software design, and electronic manufacturing techniques. Topics: chip level design of microprocessor systems, real time operating systems, alternate microprocessor architectures, and PCB layout and fabrication. Prerequisite: 218C.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Carryer, E. (PI)

ME 219: The Magic of Materials and Manufacturing

ME219 is intended for students who anticipate imagining and creating new products and who are interested in how to make the leap from making one to making many. Through a combination of lectures, weekly factory field trips, and multimedia presentations the class will help students acquire foundational professional experience with materials and materiality, manufacturing processes, and the business systems inside factories. We hope to instill in students a deep and life-long love of materials and manufacturing in order to make great products and tell a good story about each one. This class assumes basic knowledge of materials and manufacturing processes which result from taking ENGR 50, ME203, or equivalent course or life experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 243: Designing Emotion- for Reactive Car Interfaces

Students learn to define emotions as physiology, expression, and private experience using the automobile and shared space. Explores the meaning and impact of personal and user car experience. Reflective, narrative, and socio-cognitive techniques serve to make sense of mobility experiences; replay memories; examine engagement; understand user interviews. This course celebrates car fascination and leads the student through finding and telling the car experience through discussion, ethnographic research, interviews, and diverse individual and collaborative narrative methods-verbal, non-verbal, and in car experiences. Methods draw from socio-cognitive psychology, design thinking, and fine art, and are applied to the car or mobility experience. Course culminates in a final individual narrative presentation and group project demonstration. Class size limited to 18.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 244: Mechanotransduction in Cells and Tissues (BIOE 283, BIOPHYS 244)

Mechanical cues play a critical role in development, normal functioning of cells and tissues, and various diseases. This course will cover what is known about cellular mechanotransduction, or the processes by which living cells sense and respond to physical cues such as physiological forces or mechanical properties of the tissue microenvironment. Experimental techniques and current areas of active investigation will be highlighted. This class is for graduate students only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chaudhuri, O. (PI)

ME 267: Ethics and Equity in Transportation Systems

Transportation is a crucial element of human life. It enables communication with others, provides access to employment / economic opportunity, and transports goods upon which we depend. However, transportation also generates negative impacts: pollution, noise, energy consumption and risk to human life. Because of its enormous capability to affect our lives, transportation is one of the most highly regulated businesses in the world. These regulations are designed to promote social welfare, improve access, and protect vulnerable populations. This course examines the origins and impacts of transportation policy and regulation: who benefits, who bears the cost, and how social and individual objectives are achieved.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 271E: Aerial Robot Design (AA 248E, ME 171E)

(Graduate students only enroll in ME 271e or AA 248e) A result-focused introduction to the design of winged aerial robots capable of vertical takeoff and landing for a wide range of applications. Students will learn how to ideate specific aerial robot applications and make an appropriate design from scratch that meets mission requirements. Design skill outcomes include: robot need identification based on mission requirements; system ideation and sizing; making design performance tradeoffs; aerodynamic wing design; CAD assembly; communicating the design and its application. The hands-on lab experience includes prototyping the aerial robot mission, to inform system design, by building and flying quadcopters. Prerequisites: intro level undergraduate fluid mechanics or aerodynamics (e.g. ME 70 or AA 100) or equivalent; Intro level undergraduate electronics or Arduino experience; MATLAB experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lentink, D. (PI)

ME 277: Graduate Design Research Techniques

Students from different backgrounds work on real-world design challenges. The Design Thinking process with emphasis on: ethnographic techniques, needfinding, framing and concept generation. The Design Thinking process as a lens to explore ways to better understand people and their culture. Cultural differences as a source of design inspiration, with the understanding that design itself is a culturally embedded practice.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Barry, M. (PI); Jia, M. (PI)

ME 287: Mechanics of Biological Tissues

Introduction to the mechanical behaviors of biological tissues in health and disease. Overview of experimental approaches to evaluating tissue properties and mathematical constitutive models. Elastic behaviors of hard tissues, nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic models for soft tissues.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 299A: Practical Training

For master's students. Educational opportunities in high technology research and development labs in industry. Students engage in internship work and integrate that work into their academic program. Following internship work, students complete a research report outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results, and follow-up projects they expect to perform. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship/employment and faculty sponsorship. Register under faculty sponsor's section number. All paperwork must be completed by student and faculty sponsor, as the Student Services Office does not sponsor CPT. Students are allowed only two quarters of CPT per degree program. Course may be repeated twice.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 299B: Practical Training

For Ph.D. students. Educational opportunities in high technology research and development labs in industry. Students engage in internship work and integrate that work into their academic program. Following internship work, students complete a research report outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results, and follow-up projects they expect to perform. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship/employment and faculty sponsorship. Register under faculty sponsor's section number. All paperwork must be completed by student and faculty sponsor, as the student services office does not sponsor CPT. Students are allowed only two quarters of CPT per degree program. Course may be repeated twice.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 300A: Linear Algebra with Application to Engineering Computations (CME 200)

Computer based solution of systems of algebraic equations obtained from engineering problems and eigen-system analysis, Gaussian elimination, effect of round-off error, operation counts, banded matrices arising from discretization of differential equations, ill-conditioned matrices, matrix theory, least square solution of unsolvable systems, solution of non-linear algebraic equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, similar matrices, unitary and Hermitian matrices, positive definiteness, Cayley-Hamilton theory and function of a matrix and iterative methods. Prerequisite: familiarity with computer programming, and MATH51.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 304D: Designing Your Life

The course employs a design thinking approach to help fellows develop a point of view about their life and career. The course focuses on an introduction to design thinking, the integration of work and worldview, and practices that support vocation formation. Includes seminar-style discussions, role-playing, short writing assignments, guest speakers, and individual mentoring and coaching. Open to DCI (Distinguished Career Institute) Fellows only. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourlife.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Evans, D. (PI)

ME 306A: Engineering Design Theory in Practice

What is high performance in design? How could you improve your performance as a designer? Theories and frameworks from research into engineering design and design thinking are translated into action for developing insights into your design behavior and to develop strategies to improve design performance. Focus on performance in four aspects of design thinking: design as social activity, cognitive activity, physical activity and learning activity. Practice of effective team behaviors for concept generation, decision-making, and conflict-handling. Cognitive strategies from design as problem-solving, design as reflection-in-action, and C-K Theory. Prototyping performance improvements through media cascade and boundary object frameworks. Application of Perception-Action framework for improving self-learning in design. Students engage in multiple projects and a lab component.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 310A: Engineering Design Entrepreneurship and Innovation: exploring the problem space

Reality is the best teacher. The best performers are coached. The best learners are on teams of 3-4 persons. We offer an extraordinary Coaching Team to maximize the value of your time at Stanford. Your year long mission is to create the personal self-efficacy you need to engage wicked real-world design challenges. Your team is one element in a ¿team-of-teams¿ that includes a corporate staff-team and in most cases, a 2nd academic team at an international university. You will be challenged to re-invent-X, to be a start-up in Silicon Valley. Expect 10 different industry funded design challenges at the human interface to Robots, AI, Internet of Things, Autonomous vehicles and Smart Cities. ME310A is dedicated to exploring the problem-space using strategic-foresight, design thinking, team-dynamics-management, rapid prototyping, and human-centric problem RE-framing. We expect you to take ME310ABC.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 313: Human Values and Innovation in Design

Introduction to the philosophy and practice of the Design Impact program. Hands-on design projects are used as vehicles for learning design thinking's tools and methodology. The relationships among technical, human, aesthetic, and business concerns, and drawing, prototyping, and story-telling a will be explored. The focus is on design thinking process and mindsets including: empathy, point of view, ideation, prototyping and testing. For master's students in the Design Impact program only. For a general introduction to design thinking, see ME 377: Design Thinking Studio, taught Autumn and Winter quarters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Burnett, W. (PI)

ME 316A: Design Impact Master's Project I

ME316A, also known as the Idea to Impact class is a Fall/Winter class and a two-quarter commitment is required. The class is a deep dive in design thinking that uses student-led projects to teach design process and methods, based on the themes of Empathic Autonomy in Healthcare, and Empowering Power in Energy. Students will learn the methodologies of design thinking by bringing a product, service, or user-experience design to fruition/impact in the real world, through the market, with corporate partners, or as a research project. Students apply to Idea to Impact in the Summer, and teams are formed after interviews and applications are reviewed. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-6 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 318: Computer-Aided Product Creation

Design course focusing on an integrated suite of computer tools: rapid prototyping, solid modeling, computer-aided machining, and computer numerical control manufacturing. Students choose, design, and manufacture individual products, emphasizing individual design process and computer design tools. Structured lab experiences build a basic CAD/CAM/CNC proficiency. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ME103 or equivalent and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Milroy, C. (PI)

ME 336: Discontinuous Galerkin Methods for Fluid-Flow Simulations

This course is designed to provide an introduction to discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods and related high-order discontinuous solution techniques for solving partial differential equations with application to fluid flows. The course covers mathematical and theoretical concepts of the DG-methods and connections to finite-element and finite-volume methods. Computational aspects on the discretization, stabilization methods, flux-evaluations, and integration techniques will be discussed. Problems and examples will be drawn from advection-reaction-diffusion equations, non-linear Euler and Navier-Stokes systems, and related fluid-dynamics problems. As part of a series of homework assignments and projects, students will develop their own DG-method for solving the compressible flow equations in complex two-dimensional geometries.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ihme, M. (PI)

ME 340: Mechanics - Elasticity and Inelasticity

Introduction to the theories of elasticity, plasticity and fracture and their applications. Elasticity: Definition of stress, strain, and elastic energy; equilibrium and compatibility conditions; and formulation of boundary value problems. Stress function approach to solve 2D elasticity problems and Green’s function approach in 3D. Applications to contact and crack. Plasticity: Yield surface, associative flow rule, strain hardening models, crystal plasticity models. Applications to plastic bending, torsion and pressure vessels. Fracture: Linear elastic fracture mechanics, J-integral, Dugdale-Barrenblatt crack model. Applications to brittle fracture and fatigue crack growth. Computer programming in Matlab is used to aid analytic derivation and numerical solutions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gu, W. (PI)

ME 348: Experimental Stress Analysis

Theory and applications of photoelasticity, strain sensors, and holographic interferometry. Comparison of test results with theoretical predictions of stress and strain. Discussion of other methods (optical fiber strain sensors, digital image correlation, thermoelasticity, brittle coating, Moire interferometry, residual stress determination). Six labs plus mini-project. Limited enrollment. Lab fee.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 351A: Fluid Mechanics

Exact and approximate analysis of fluid flow covering kinematics, global and differential equations of mass, momentum, and energy conservation. Forces and stresses in fluids. Euler¿s equations and the Bernoulli theorem applied to inviscid flows. Vorticity dynamics. Topics in irrotational flow: stream function and velocity potential for exact and approximate solutions; superposition of solutions; complex potential function; circulation and lift. Some boundary layer concepts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Su, L. (PI)

ME 362A: Physical Gas Dynamics

Concepts and techniques for description of high-temperature and chemically reacting gases from a molecular point of view. Introductory kinetic theory, chemical thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics as applied to properties of gases and gas mixtures. Transport and thermodynamic properties, law of mass action, and equilibrium chemical composition. Maxwellian and Boltzmann distributions of velocity and molecular energy. Examples and applications from areas of current interest such as combustion and materials processing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bowman, C. (PI)

ME 370A: Energy Systems I: Thermodynamics

Thermodynamic analysis of energy systems emphasizing systematic methodology for and application of basic principles to generate quantitative understanding. Exergy, mixtures, reacting systems, phase equilibrium, chemical exergy, and modern computational methods for analysis. Prerequisites: undergraduate engineering thermodynamics and computer skills such as Matlab.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 377: Design Thinking Studio

Design Thinking Studio is an immersive introduction to design thinking. You will engage in the real world with your heart, hands and mind to learn and apply the tools and attitudes of design. The class is project-based and emphasizes adopting new behaviors of work. Fieldwork and collaboration with teammates are required and are a critical component of the class. Application required, see dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 378: Tell, Make, Engage: Action Stories for Entrepreneuring

Individual storytelling action and reflective observations gives the course an evolving framework of evaluative methods, from engineering design; socio cognitive psychology; and art that are formed and reformed by collaborative development within the class. Stories attached to an idea, a discovery or starting up something new, are considered through iterative narrative work, storytelling as rapid prototyping and small group challenges. This course will use qualitative and quantitative methods for story engagement, assessment, and class determined research projects with practice exercises, artifacts, short papers and presentations. Graduate and Co-Term students from all programs welcome. Class size limited to 21.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 390A: High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory Research Project Seminar

Review of work in a particular research program and presentations of other related work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, H. (PI); Zheng, X. (PI)

ME 391: Engineering Problems

Directed study for graduate engineering students on subjects of mutual interest to student and staff member. May be used to prepare for experimental research during a later quarter under 392. Faculty sponsor required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 395: Seminar in Solid Mechanics

Required of Ph.D. candidates in solid mechanics. Guest speakers present research topics related to mechanics theory, computational methods, and applications in science and engineering. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cai, W. (PI)

ME 397: Design Theory and Methodology Seminar

What do designers do when they do design? How can their performance be improved? ME 397 is a participatory graduate seminar where students create, examine, discuss, and evaluate aspects of these questions. Topics change each quarter, and include design methodology, innovation, human factors, interaction design (robots, agents, devices, cars), computer mediated work, and policy implications. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 398: Ph.D. Research Rotation

Directed research experience for first-year Mechanical Engineering Ph.D. students with faculty sponsors. The student is responsible for arranging the faculty sponsor and registering under the faculty sponsor's section number. Course may be repeated up to four times in the first year. A different faculty sponsor must be selected each time.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 410A: Introductory Foresight and Technological Innovation

Learn to develop long-range, technology-based innovations (5+ years based on industry). This course offers an intensive, hands-on approach using multiple engineering foresight strategies and tools. Model disruptive opportunities and create far-to-near development plans. Three quarter sequence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Cockayne, W. (PI)

ME 461: Advanced Topics in Turbulence

Turbulence phenomenology; statistical description and the equations governing the mean flow; fluctuations and their energetics; turbulence closure problem, two-equation turbulence models, and second moment closures; non-local effect of pressure; rapid distortion analysis and effect of shear and compression on turbulence; effect of body forces on turbulent flows; buoyancy-generated turbulence; suppression of turbulence by stratification; turbulent flows of variable density; effect of rotation on homogeneous turbulence; turbulent flows with strong vortices. Prerequisites: 351B and 361A, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lele, S. (PI)

ME 492: Mechanical Engineering Teaching Assistance Training

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kaplan, K. (PI)
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