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HRP 89Q: Introduction to Cross Cultural Issues in Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Introduction to social factors that impact health care delivery, such as ethnicity, immigration, language barriers, and patient service expectations. Focus is on developing a framework to understand culturally unique and non-English speaking populations in the health care system.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Corso, I. (PI)

HRP 201B: Health Policy PhD Core Seminar II--First Year (MED 215B)

Second in a three-quarter seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy and Health Services Research graduate students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Bundorf, M. (PI)

HRP 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, MED 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 208: Introduction to Concepts and Methods in Health Services and Policy Research II

Primarily for medical students in the Health Services and Policy Research scholarly concentration; continuation of 207. Topics include health economics, statistics, decision analysis, study design, quality measurement, cost benefit and effectiveness analysis, and evidence based guidelines. Recommended: 207.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 214: Scientific Writing

Step-by-step through the process of writing and publishing a scientific manuscript. How to write effectively, concisely, and clearly in preparation of an actual scientific manuscript. Students are encouraged to bring a manuscript on which they are currently working to develop and polish throughout the course. Please note 3-units students will additionally write and revise a manuscript.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sainani, K. (PI)

HRP 218: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (CHPR 212, MED 212)

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students. Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Asch, S. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI)

HRP 219: Evaluating Technologies for Diagnosis, Prediction and Screening

New technologies designed to monitor and improve health outcomes are constantly emerging, but most fail in the clinic and in the marketplace because relatively few are supported by reliable, reproducible evidence that they produce a health benefit. This course covers the designs and methods that should be used to evaluate technologies to diagnose patients, predict prognosis or other health events, or screen for disease. These technologies can include devices, statistical prediction rules, biomarkers, gene panels, algorithms, imaging, or any information used to predict a future or a previously unknown health state. Specific topics to be covered include the phases of test development, how to frame a proper evaluation question, measures of test accuracy, Bayes theorem, internal and external validation, prediction evaluation criteria, decision analysis, net-utility, ROC curves, c-statistics, net reclassification index, decision curves and reporting standards. Examples of technology assessments and original methods papers are used. Software used in the course is R or Stata. Open to graduate students with a solid understanding of introductory biostatistics, epidemiologic and clinical research study design, and of medical conditions and related technologies required. Basic understanding of Stata or R is also required. Undergraduates may enroll with consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Goodman, S. (PI)

HRP 221: Law and the Biosciences: Genetics

(Same as LAW 3004) Open to all law or medical students; other graduate students by consent of the instructor. Focus is on ethical, legal, and social issues arising from advances in our knowledge of human genetics. Includes forensic uses of genetics, genetic testing, widespread whole genome sequencing, the consequences of genetics for human reproduction, and the ethics of genomic biobanks for research. Research paper required.
Terms: Win, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Greely, H. (PI)

HRP 224: Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health (MED 224, PUBLPOL 224)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health is a new Collaboratory workshop for students/fellows to design/develop innovative social ventures/solutions addressing key challenges in public health and the environment, in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030). SE Lab is open to students/fellows across Stanford and combines design thinking exercises, short lectures & case studies, workshops, small group teamwork, presentations, guest speakers, and faculty, practitioner and peer feedback to support/advance development of your ideas/plans. Join SE Lab with an idea or simply the desire to join a team. Enrollment limited to 32. Instructor's permission required.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Bloom, G. (PI)

HRP 226: Intermediate Epidemiologic and Clinical Research Methods

The principles of study design, measurement, confounding, effect modification, and strategies for minimizing bias in clinical and epidemiologic studies. Prerequisite: 225 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Simard, J. (PI)

HRP 229: Spectrum Scholars Seminar

Preference to trainees awarded Stanford internal KL2, TL1 grants. Focus is on students and junior faculty who have received a Spectrum KL2 or TL1 Award. Discussions include progress and challenges involved in starting and conducting clinical research, current courses, time management and resources; support from peers; education and professional development. All scholars are required to attend a weekly seminar series meeting throughout the year that will cover an array of cross-cutting methodological topics with published examples of implementation. Prerequisite: Awarded a Spectrum KL2, TL1 Grant or Spectrum UL1
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 231: Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Principles of the transmission of the infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, rickettsiae, mycoplasma, fungi, and protozoan and helminth parasites). The role of vectors, reservoirs, and environmental factors. Pathogen and host characteristics that determine the spectrum of infection and disease. Endemicity, outbreaks, and epidemics of selected infectious diseases. Principles of control and surveillance.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

HRP 236: Epidemiology Research Seminar

Weekly forum for ongoing epidemiologic research by faculty, staff, guests, and students, emphasizing research issues relevant to disease causation, prevention, and treatment. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 237: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (INTLPOL 290, MED 226)

(Formerly IPS 290) How do you come up with an idea for health research overseas? How do you develop a research question, concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, difficult cultural situations, or unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aims at graduate students; undergraduates in their junior or senior year may enroll with instructor consent. This course is restricted to undergraduates unless they have completed 85 units or more.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Luby, S. (PI)

HRP 238: Genes and Environment in Disease Causation: Implications for Medicine and Public Health (HUMBIO 159)

The historical, contemporary, and future research and practice among genetics, epidemiology, clinical medicine, and public health as a source of insight for medicine and public health. Genetic and environmental contributions to multifactorial diseases; multidisciplinary approach to enhancing detection and diagnosis. The impact of the Human Genome Project on analysis of cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and cancer. Ethical and social issues in the use of genetic information. Prerequisite:Human Biology core or BIO 82 or consent of instructor. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Popat, R. (PI)

HRP 239: Statistical Methods for Group Comparisons and Causal Inference (EDUC 260A, STATS 209)

See http://rogosateaching.com/stat209/. Critical examination of statistical methods in social science and life sciences applications, especially for cause and effect determinations. Topics: mediating and moderating variables, potential outcomes framework, encouragement designs, multilevel models, heterogeneous treatment effects, matching and propensity score methods, analysis of covariance, instrumental variables, compliance, path analysis and graphical models, group comparisons with longitudinal data. Prerequisite: intermediate-level statistical methods.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rogosa, D. (PI)

HRP 244: Developing Measurement Tools for Health Research

The focus of this course is on providing the skills necessary to develop, validate and administer both qualitative and quantitative measures and instruments. Topics will include creating valid measures, ensuring the measures used address and apply to the research questions, design and samples; determining when to use standardized measures or develop new ones; instrument validation techniques; factor analysis; and survey administration, including determining the most effective way of administering measures (e.g., online, paper-and-pencil, ACASI) and the best way to design the survey.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Halpern-Felsher, B. (PI)

HRP 246: Seminar in Healthcare Quality and Safety (BIOMEDIN 246)

Primarily for medical students in the Quality and Safety Scholarly Concentration. Almost everyone will be a patient at some point in their lives. It is estimated that over 98,000 patients die in US hospitals each year due to medical errors and recent articles suggest that medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the US. Patient safety is the foundation of high-quality health care, which has become a critical issue in health policy discussions. This course will provide an overview of the quality & patient safety movement, the array of measurement techniques and issues, and perspectives of quality improvement efforts under the current policy landscape.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 253: Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention

This course focuses on the role of epidemiology in cancer etiology, prevvention, and control. We will discuss descriptive epidemiology, including cancer trends and patterns, natural history, and biologic characteristics as well as etiology of selected cancers. the influence of environmental and genetic factors and their interplay on the development of cancer are discussed as well as methodologic issues related to investigations of these studies. Principles and problems involved in cancer prevention and screening are covered. Student evaluation is based on a brief presentation and a paper on the descriptive epidemiology of a selected cancer, and participation in class discussions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Hsing, A. (PI)

HRP 261: Intermediate Biostatistics: Analysis of Discrete Data (BIOMEDIN 233, STATS 261)

Methods for analyzing data from case-control and cross-sectional studies: the 2x2 table, chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, odds ratios, Mantel-Haenzel methods, stratification, tests for matched data, logistic regression, conditional logistic regression. Emphasis is on data analysis in SAS. Special topics: cross-fold validation and bootstrap inference.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Sainani, K. (PI)

HRP 263: Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health (MED 263)

Advanced methods currently used in published model-based cost-effectiveness analyses in medicine and public health, both theory and technical applications. Topics include: Markov and microsimulation models, model calibration and evaluation, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Prerequisites: a course in probability, a course in statistics or biostatistics, a course on cost-effectiveness such as HRP 392, a course in economics, and familiarity with decision modeling software such as TreeAge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 272: The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research

The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research course will focus on how the science of community engagement can be applied to diverse health-related research topics across the translational spectrum with the ultimate goal of high quality research that transforms human health and addresses health disparities. The course will provide historical context, theoretical frameworks, foundational skills in diverse community engagement methodologies, and tools for examining the effectiveness of various engagement strategies aimed. Specifically, the course will cover: 1) Historical context for community engagement in health-related research; 2) Evolution of community engagement as a science; 3) Theoretical frameworks for various community engagement approaches; 4) Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR); 5) Community engagement strategies for different stages of translational research; and 6) Evaluation of various engagement strategies; and 7) Ethics of community engagement. Students will gain practical experience in various community engagement tools and strategies to help guide the development of a community engagement plan responsive to community needs. Challenges and benefits of establishing community partnerships will be highlighted by real-world examples. nThe course will include lectures; interactive student-led presentations and guided exercises; class discussions among invited speakers, students and instructors; individual and group assignments; and organized small-group and experiential activities. Course readings will demonstrate the need and opportunity for interdisciplinary community engagement approaches and will illustrate how to conduct innovative community-engaged research. nThe Science of Community Engagement course is intended to reach students with diverse research interests, including clinical research, community health, health research and policy, epidemiology, prevention research, environmental health, etc.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 273: Essentials of Clinical Research at Stanford

The course will consist of an introduction to the fundamentals of clinical research at Stanford, including the science of clinical research (design and analysis) and logistics (GCP, data management, regulatory). Material will be covered in approximately 4-6 3 hour sessions per quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 275: Population Health Research

This course provides hands-on experience for students wishing to undertake health-related research using registry data covering the population of Denmark. Students will be instructed in basic R-programming, which they will use to analyze anonmyized Danish data (prior experience with R not required). Students will become familiar with the Danish data and develop a detailed original research proposal on a health-related topic addressable within the Danish data. Most students should be able to complete their proposed research in independent studies after successful completion of this course. nPrerequisites: HRP 259 or comparable introductory course in statistics. Special permission from the instructor required without prerequisites.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 281: Spanish for Medical Students (SPANLANG 122M)

Second quarter of three-quarter series.Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on performing a physical examination. Topics include anatomy, general hospital procedures, reproductive health, emergency medicine, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge. Undergraduates are welcome to enroll.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Corso, I. (PI)

HRP 290: Advanced Medical Spanish

Enrollment limited to medical students. Designed to further develop linguistic skills, covering all medical specialties according to student needs. Sessions also include topics on patient education and diseases, such as diabetes, asthma, TB, and CVDs.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Corso, I. (PI)

HRP 299: Directed Reading in Health Research and Policy

Epidemiology, health services research, preventive medicine, medical genetics, public health, economics of medical care, occupational or environmental medicine, international health, or related fields. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

HRP 391: Health Law: Finance and Insurance (PUBLPOL 231)

(SAME AS LAW 3001, MGTECON 331) This course provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the U.S. We will discuss the Affordable Care Act , health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), the approval process and IP protection for pharmaceuticals, and antitrust policy. We may discuss obesity and wellness, regulation of fraud and abuse, and medical malpractice. The syllabus for this course can be found at https://syllabus.stanford.edu. Elements used in grading: Participation, attendance, class presentation, and final exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 800: Second Year Health Policy PHD Tutorial

The goal of the second year tutorial is to provide PHD students with advanced training in health policy research and to assist them in successfully developing research proposals.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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