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GERMAN 13Q: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (DLCL 13Q, HUMCORE 13Q)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon. N.B. This is the third of three courses in the European track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study European history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future. Students who take HUMCORE 11 and HUMCORE 12Q will have preferential admission to HUMCORE 13Q (a WR2 seminar).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 88: Germany in 5 Words (GERMAN 101)

This course explores German history, culture and politics by tracing five (largely untranslatable) words and exploring the debates they have engendered in Germany over the past 200 years. This course is intended as preparation for students wishing to spend a quarter at the Bing Overseas Studies campus in Berlin, but is open to everyone. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Daub, A. (PI)

GERMAN 101: Germany in 5 Words (GERMAN 88)

This course explores German history, culture and politics by tracing five (largely untranslatable) words and exploring the debates they have engendered in Germany over the past 200 years. This course is intended as preparation for students wishing to spend a quarter at the Bing Overseas Studies campus in Berlin, but is open to everyone. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Daub, A. (PI)

GERMAN 116: Writing About Germany: New Topics, New Genres

Writing about various topics in German Studies. Topics based on student interests: current politics, economics, European affairs, start-ups in Germany. Intensive focus on writing. Students may write on their experience at Stanford in Berlin or their internship. Fulfills the WIM requirement for German Studies majors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Starkey, K. (PI)

GERMAN 120C: German in Public: 99 German Songs

Explore Germany in 99 songs -- Marlene Dietrich to Kraftwerk, Schubert to Nena. A class to hum along to! Taught in German.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Daub, A. (PI)

GERMAN 132: History and Politics of the Future in Germany, 1900-Present

The twentieth century brought profound changes to Germany, including two World Wars, changing borders, and the division between competing Cold War ideological blocs. At the same time, the necessity to build and reshape Germany also inspired politicians, writers, and filmmakers to think about how society could be made anew. The century especially ushered in a new era for thoughts about the future. Thinkers imagined new technologies, social structures, and political orders as they dreamed about a German future that could be different from its recent past. Furthermore, this period represented a golden age of German science fiction, as authors thought about what the future could and should be.nThis class considers the possibilities that Germans imagined for the future in the face of ambiguous promises of peace and warfare, democracy and totalitarianism, and capitalism and communism. Regardless of whether these hopes, dreams, and fears came to fruition, historical visions of the future illuminate the lives of Germans during the twentieth century.nThis course will use close readings of several types of primary sources, including films, television shows, short stories, political posters, art, and newspaper articles. We will consider what different thinkers anticipated as the possibilities for the development of the country and what they saw as the driving forces of change, such as mechanics and computers, political parties, and social movements. We will discuss which advancements they thought seemed likely and which seemed fantastical. Finally, this class will investigate how the future offered a space for dissident thinkers to articulate their frustrations with state and society.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, C. (PI)

GERMAN 191: German Capstone Project

Each student participates in a capstone interview and discussion with a panel of the German Studies faculty on topics related to German cultural and literary analysis. In prepration for the interview/discussion, students submit written answers to a set of questions based on several authentic cultural texts in German. The written answers, normally in English, should be well-formed and coherent. Within the interview/discussion, students must demonstrate a further understanding of the topic(s) posed, through cogent argument.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Starkey, K. (PI)

GERMAN 199: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 222: Myth and Modernity (COMPLIT 222A, GERMAN 322, JEWISHST 242G, JEWISHST 342)

Masters of German 20th- and 21st-Century literature and philosophy as they present aesthetic innovation and confront the challenges of modern technology, social alienation, manmade catastrophes, and imagine the future. Readings include Nietzsche, Freud, Rilke, Musil, Brecht, Kafka, Doeblin, Benjamin, Juenger, Arendt, Musil, Mann, Adorno, Celan, Grass, Bachmann, Bernhardt, Wolf, and Kluge. Taught in English. WAYS Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take GERMAN 222 or COMPLIT 222A for a minimum of 3 Units and a letter grade. Note for German Studies grad students: GERMAN 322 will fulfill the grad core requirement since GERMAN 332 is not being offered this year.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Eshel, A. (PI)

GERMAN 249: Nazi Morality: The Ethics of Racism and the Question of Guilt after 1945 (GERMAN 349)

While the moral perversion of the "Third Reich" is beyond question, recent scholarship has explored the Nazi "belief system" and its legacy. This seminar first examines new research on the National Socialists' concept of the "Volksgemeinschaft" (people's community) and its political and social applications. In addition, the consequences of this Nazi "Weltanschauung" in post-war Germany will be examined. Special attention to how German intellectuals and politicians approached the issue of "German Guilt" after 1945, as well as how popular discourse engaged in the critique of an alleged Allied concept of "collective guilt." nNote: The course will be taught by Visiting Professor Norbert Frei, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 253: Hannah Arendt: Facing Totalitarianism (COMPLIT 253, JEWISHST 243A)

Like hardly any other thinker of the modern age, Hannah Arendtss thought offers us timeless insights into the fabric of the modern age, especially regarding the perennial danger of totalitarianism. This course offers an in-depth introduction to Arendt's most important works in their various contexts, as well as a consideration of their reverberations in contemporary philosophy and literature. Readings include Arendt's <em>The Origin of Totalitarianism</em>, <em>The Human Condition, Between Past and Future</em>, <em>Men in Dark Times</em>, <em>On Revolution</em>,<em>Eichmann in Jerusalem</em>, and <em>The Life of the Mind</em>, as well as considerations of Hannah Arendt's work by Max Frisch, Jürgen Habermas, Seyla Benhabib, Judith Butler, Giorgio Agamben, and others. Special attention will be given to Arendt's writings on literature with emphasis on Kafka, Brecht, Auden, Sartre, and Camus.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Eshel, A. (PI)

GERMAN 322: Myth and Modernity (COMPLIT 222A, GERMAN 222, JEWISHST 242G, JEWISHST 342)

Masters of German 20th- and 21st-Century literature and philosophy as they present aesthetic innovation and confront the challenges of modern technology, social alienation, manmade catastrophes, and imagine the future. Readings include Nietzsche, Freud, Rilke, Musil, Brecht, Kafka, Doeblin, Benjamin, Juenger, Arendt, Musil, Mann, Adorno, Celan, Grass, Bachmann, Bernhardt, Wolf, and Kluge. Taught in English. WAYS Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take GERMAN 222 or COMPLIT 222A for a minimum of 3 Units and a letter grade. Note for German Studies grad students: GERMAN 322 will fulfill the grad core requirement since GERMAN 332 is not being offered this year.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Eshel, A. (PI)

GERMAN 349: Nazi Morality: The Ethics of Racism and the Question of Guilt after 1945 (GERMAN 249)

While the moral perversion of the "Third Reich" is beyond question, recent scholarship has explored the Nazi "belief system" and its legacy. This seminar first examines new research on the National Socialists' concept of the "Volksgemeinschaft" (people's community) and its political and social applications. In addition, the consequences of this Nazi "Weltanschauung" in post-war Germany will be examined. Special attention to how German intellectuals and politicians approached the issue of "German Guilt" after 1945, as well as how popular discourse engaged in the critique of an alleged Allied concept of "collective guilt." nNote: The course will be taught by Visiting Professor Norbert Frei, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 397: Graduate Studies Colloquium

Colloquium for graduate students in German Studies. Taught in English. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Eshel, A. (PI)

GERMAN 399: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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