Print Settings
 

GERMAN 57N: Nietzsche and the Search for Meaning

Many of us have heard his declarations of the death of God, the arrival of the Superman, and the need to live beyond good and evil. But what, beyond such sound bites, did Nietzsche actually teach? How can his writings be understood in the context of their own time? And what significance might they hold for us today?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, M. (PI)

GERMAN 97: 10 Poems That Will Change Your Life

This course is for anyone who has ever been afraid of poetry, anyone who has ever thought that poems are too difficult to understand, a course for anyone who has fallen in love with poetry before, and for anyone who has used a poem to make a difference in someone's life. You will learn how to read, understand, and if you don't already like poetry. We will read poems from different centuries, different kinds of writers, and different media (paper, computer screens, and even DNA); they will be about loss and love and war and loyalty and bacteria. Some of them will be about you. You will develop interpretive skills that come with this range of poetic forms and structures and will learn how to think about what it means for something to be poetic, whether it is a poem, a Leonard Cohen song, a last minute field goal, or a toilet. Can the poems in this class really change your life? (What would that even mean? We'll discuss.) Maybe; maybe not. But they're certainly going to try.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pao, L. (PI)

GERMAN 112: History of Surveillance (GERMAN 312, HISTORY 209J, HISTORY 309J)

The question of surveillance (and its limits) is increasingly becoming a concern for individuals, organizations, and states around the globe. Indeed, from NSA databases to Alexa recordings, surveillance seems to be an unavoidable aspect of modern life. But how did surveillance become an everyday experience? This course explores the technological advancements, political aims, ideological commitments, and military goals that have fueled the rise of surveillance, especially throughout the past century. We will examine the ways in which states and organizations have developed surveillance programs and the consequences that these programs have had on both the watchers and the watched.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, C. (PI)

GERMAN 116: Writing About Germany: New Topics, New Genres

Writing about various topics in German Studies. Topics based on student interests: current politics, economics, European affairs, start-ups in Germany. Intensive focus on writing. Students may write on their experience at Stanford in Berlin or their internship. Fulfills the WIM requirement for German Studies majors.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pao, L. (PI)

GERMAN 120D: The German Graphic Novel

This course is an introduction to the history, theory, and social life of German graphic novels. We will look at early examples of text-and-image (Sebastian Brant¿s "Ship of Fools," a satire published in 1497, Heinrich Hoffmann¿s "Der Struwwelpeter," an 1845 children¿s book detailing various forms of misbehavior in spine-chilling visual detail, or Wilhelm Busch¿s 1895 tale of the mischievous brothers "Max und Moritz") and modern and contemporary comics, political caricatures, and graphic novels from Swiss, German, and Austrian artists (Nicolas Mahler, Gerhard Haderer, Manfred Deix, Ulli Lust, Max Goldt, or Anke Feuchtenberger). This course is in German; no prior knowledge of the topic is required. You will develop your German reading, speaking, and writing skills through a variety of short creative assignments and in-class discussions, develop critical reading skills as they attend to specific formal features, and improve your abilities to think historically about the emergence and development of aesthetic forms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pao, L. (PI)

GERMAN 131: What is German Literature?

The aim of this course is to provide a general introduction to German literary and cultural history. What counts as history and literature will be tested and provoked as we examine Germany in its entirety and not just in its whiteness. From unification to the present, we will reflect on identity formation in Germany and challenge the idea that Germany was/is constructed as a homogeneous white nation. In this course, we will discuss the perception of the German colonies, the Holocaust, Postwar, and Reunification from the perspective of marginalized Germans. These Germans (e.g. Black Germans, Turkish Germans, Jewish Germans, Asian Germans), have a long history that is too often ignored. Taught in German.nPrerequisite: One year of German language at Stanford or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Watkins, J. (PI)

GERMAN 199: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 239: Queer Theory (COMPLIT 239, FEMGEN 239)

Do we really need a theory in order to be queer? Queer Theory emerged in response to feminist thought, and the study of the history of sexuality, building on their insights, but also uncovering their blind spots. Without Queer Theory, few of the discourses around desire, power and gender identity that we take for granted on college campuses today would exist. Yet there is also a real risk that reality has left the theory behind. In this course, we will try to answer the question: What do we need queer theory for? Do we still need it? And if so, of what kind? The course is designed to introduce students to core texts of queer theory, and to connect them to current debates, be this around trans rights, the representation of homosexuality or the fight against campus sexual assault.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Daub, A. (PI)

GERMAN 267: Prospects for Transatlantic Relations: What Holds the West Together? (GERMAN 367)

This seminar treats disintegration tendencies in the trans-Atlantic West, including the impact of China and Russia in globalization and north-south issues inside the EU. This course involves participation in an international conference during October and the preparation of individual research papers.nMeeting times: This seminar will meet from 9:00 to 11:00am in room 260-252 on Monday, October 21, Wednesday, October 23 and Friday, October 25, 2019
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 312: History of Surveillance (GERMAN 112, HISTORY 209J, HISTORY 309J)

The question of surveillance (and its limits) is increasingly becoming a concern for individuals, organizations, and states around the globe. Indeed, from NSA databases to Alexa recordings, surveillance seems to be an unavoidable aspect of modern life. But how did surveillance become an everyday experience? This course explores the technological advancements, political aims, ideological commitments, and military goals that have fueled the rise of surveillance, especially throughout the past century. We will examine the ways in which states and organizations have developed surveillance programs and the consequences that these programs have had on both the watchers and the watched.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, C. (PI)

GERMAN 367: Prospects for Transatlantic Relations: What Holds the West Together? (GERMAN 267)

This seminar treats disintegration tendencies in the trans-Atlantic West, including the impact of China and Russia in globalization and north-south issues inside the EU. This course involves participation in an international conference during October and the preparation of individual research papers.nMeeting times: This seminar will meet from 9:00 to 11:00am in room 260-252 on Monday, October 21, Wednesday, October 23 and Friday, October 25, 2019
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 396: German Studies Lecture Series

What's happening in German Studies today? The GSLS invites 3 speakers per quarter to present on their work and research in German literature, culture, politics, and history, offering students an insight into the current field of German Studies and an engagement with topics ranging from medieval fabrics to the refugee crisis. Luncheons are scheduled every first Tuesday of the month. To earn the unit for this course, students will attend the lecture, read 1-2 articles or book chapters written by the speaker of the week, and complete one short 2-page writing assignment (this could be a reflection, a review, a creative assignment, a poetic adaptation of a talk¿we'll discuss).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pao, L. (PI)

GERMAN 397: Graduate Studies Colloquium

Colloquium for graduate students in German Studies. Taught in English. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Eshel, A. (PI)

GERMAN 399: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 680: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree. nPrerequisite: German Studies Ph.D candidate.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Starkey, K. (PI)

GERMAN 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints