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DLCL 1: CSN Undergraduate Colloquium (ENGLISH 1)

This colloquium is intended for undergraduates who are interested in the history and theory of the novel, and who would like to attend the Center for the Study of the Novel's (CSN) annual conference. Before the conference, students will meet with CSN's graduate student staff, to read and discuss a small number of key texts by participating scholars, whose presentations students will then attend. After the conference, the colloquium will meet again, to discuss both the readings and conference papers, and explore their broader implications for the study of the novel. Attendance at both meetings of the colloquium, and at least one panel at the conference, is required for course credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cohen, M. (PI)

DLCL 13Q: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (GERMAN 13Q, HUMCORE 13Q)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon. N.B. This is the third of three courses in the European track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study European history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future. Students who take HUMCORE 11 and HUMCORE 12Q will have preferential admission to HUMCORE 13Q (a WR2 seminar).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 33Q: Humanities Core: Middle East III -- Future (COMPLIT 33Q, HUMCORE 33Q)

How do we face the future? What resources do we have? Which power structures hold us back and which empower us? What are our identities here at college on the far Western edge of the Western world? In 1850s Lebabnon, Abu Faris Shidyaq faced all these same questions except for the last of course though he did face a version of even that question, one proper to a mid-19th c. Christian magazine editor. In HumCore Middle East III - Future, we engage with global claims about identity culture and politics. Ganzeer's graphic novel speaks to California as much as to Egypt; Ataturk's speeches are about power and identity just like Donald Trump's. Whether in Turkish novels or Arabic poetry, the people we engage in this course are looking to their pasts and futures, just like us. N.B. This is the third of three courses in the Middle Eastern track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study Middle Eastern history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Karahan, B. (PI); Key, A. (PI)

DLCL 102: 10 Jobs in 10 Weeks: Leveraging Your Liberal Arts Career

This course is designed to give students a taste of 10 career fields in 10 weeks. Each week features an alum from a different industry, and a hands-on project pulled from their typical workday. In addition to guest speakers and in-class projects, focus is on tangible takeaways such as building a personal brand pyramid. Students also collaborate on exercises that teach them to articulate the core skills humanities and arts students bring to the table. Priority to undergraduates in the humanities and arts. For more information, see https://beam.stanford.edu/students/bachelors-co-terms-masters/courses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DLCL 122: Medieval Manuscripts, Digital Methodologies (ENGLISH 122)

Medieval Studies is entering a phase of digital abundance. In the last seven years, more medieval material has been put online than has ever been available for study at any point in the past. How can we engage with the growing mass of digitized material available to us? How does this sudden access impact the work we do, the types of questions we ask, the connections we make, and the audiences we write for?nnIn this course, we will examine and evaluate digital medieval resources and software that has been created for interacting with those resources. Students will have the opportunity to design and create an innovative project based on medieval primary sources held at Stanford, applying current digital methods in the analysis and presentation of those resources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Albritton, B. (PI)

DLCL 143: The Novel and the World (COMPLIT 123)

<p><b>Before the Digital Era: the European Design of the Novel.</b> The course will trace the development of the modern literary genre par excellence through some of its great milestones from the 17th century to the present. Works by Austen, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Queiròs, Mann, Roth, Woolf, Lampedusa and Rodoreda.<em>Lazarillo de Tormes</em>, Jane Austen: <em>Pride and Prejudice</em>, Flaubert: <em>Madame Bovary</em>, Dostoevsky: <em>Crime and Punishment</em>, Eça de Queirós: <em>The City and the Mountains</em>, Thomas Mann: <em>Death in Venice</em>, Joseph Roth: <em>Radietskymarsh</em>, Virginia Woolf: <em>Mrs. Dalloway</em>, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, <em>The Leopard</em>, Mercé Rodoreda: <em>The Time of the Doves.</em></p>
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Resina, J. (PI)

DLCL 189C: Honors Thesis Seminar

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Planning, researching, and writing an honors thesis. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Research and writing methodologies, and larger critical issues in literary studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DLCL 199: Honors Thesis Oral Presentation

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Regular advisory meetings required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DLCL 219: Collaborative Teaching Project

The Collaborative Teaching Project (CTP) has supported Stanford faculty and graduate students by offering a series of team-taught courses in the humanities, with the goal of preparing graduate students for careers as liberal arts educators. CTP thus facilitates and funds collaborations between one faculty member and 1-2 graduate students in order to co-teach a course. The graduate students and their faculty mentor work together on as many aspects of the course as possible, including syllabus, gathering and choosing materials, preparing assignments, lectures, presentations, class activities, and other in-class events, grading and feedback, evaluation of the course itself, and so on.
Terms: offered occasionally | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wittman, L. (PI)

DLCL 220: Humanities Education

Humanities Education explores issues concerning teaching and learning in the humanities, including research on student learning, innovation in pedagogy, the role of new technologies in humanities instruction, and professional issues for humanities teachers at all educational levels.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berman, R. (PI)

DLCL 221: Materia

Materia is a focal group on post-anthropocentrism, Latin Americanist and otherwise. Building on and expanding the theoretical framework offered by thinkers such as Fernando Ortiz, Bruno Latour, and Jane Bennett, we engage with works of literature and criticism that de-center the human as object of study. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group, prepare the pre-circulated readings, and actively contribute to discussion throughout the year. The latter can take place during plenary, over office hours with faculty leaders, or via contributions to the focal group's online platforms. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoyos, H. (PI)

DLCL 222: Philosophy and Literature

The Focal Group in Philosophy and Literature brings together scholars and students from eight departments to investigate questions in aesthetics and literary theory, philosophically-inflected literary texts, and the form of philosophical writings. Fields of interest include both continental and analytic philosophy, as well as cognitive science, political philosophy, rational choice theory, and related fields. Students may sign up for a unit of credit each quarter via DLCL 222. To earn the unit, students must do one of the following three things: (a) attend an event hosted by the Philosophy and Literature group (including events hosted by the graduate workshop) and write up a reaction paper of 2-5 pages; (b) present a paper of their own to the graduate workshop; (c) agree with one of the DLCL 222 instructors on a reading related to the year¿s activities, and meet with him/her for a discussion of that reading. For details, please refer to the Philosophy+Literature web site: http://philit.stanford.edu/programs/dlcl222. Prerequisite for undergraduates: undergraduate students wishing to take DLCL 222 must previously have taken the philosophy and literature gateway course PHIL 81 (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, SLAVIC 181) or a class taught by one of the instructors of DLCL 222.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 223: Renaissances

The Renaissances Group brings together faculty members and students from several departments at Stanford to consider the present and future of early modern literary studies (a period spanning the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries). Taking seriously the plural form of the group's name, we seek to explore the early modern period from a wide range of disciplinary, cultural, linguistic, and geographical perspectives.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Greene, R. (PI)

DLCL 224: Workshop in Poetics

The Workshop in Poetics is concerned with the theoretical and practical dimensions of the reading and criticism of poetry. During the eleven years of its existence, the Workshop has become a central venue at Stanford enabling participants to share their individual projects in a general conversation outside of disciplinary and national confinements. The two dimensions that the workshop sees as urgent are: poetics in its specificity as an arena for theory and interpretive practice, and historical poetics as a particular set of challenges for the reader and scholar.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Greene, R. (PI)

DLCL 227: Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

PATH+ is a DLCL focal group that provides a space for conversations about Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew languages, literatures, and cultures in the DLCL. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group and contribute one substantive response during the quarter. This can come in the form of an individual discussion with one of the two lead faculty, 1,500 words of contribution to the focal group's online platforms, or a presentation to the group itself.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Key, A. (PI)

DLCL 229: The Contemporary

The Contemporary is a focal group dedicated to the study of recent innovative works in literature and the arts as they touch on social, political, and philosophical concerns of our era. Building on and expanding the theoretical framework offered by thinkers as Hannah Arendt, Paul Rabinow, or Giorgio Agamben, we seek to trace the capacity of the artistic imagination to broaden the vocabulary with which we address contemporary challenges to freedom and to meaningful action. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group and contribute one substantive response during the year. This can come in the form of an individual discussion with one of the two lead faculty, 1,500 words of contribution to the focal group's online platforms, or a presentation to the group itself. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Eshel, A. (PI)

DLCL 293: Literary Translation (ENGLISH 293)

An overview of translation theories and practices over time. The aesthetic, ethical, and political questions raised by the act and art of translation and how these pertain to the translator's tasks. Discussion of particular translation challenges and the decision processes taken to address these issues. Coursework includes assigned theoretical readings, comparative translations, and the undertaking of an individual translation project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Santana, C. (PI)

DLCL 301: The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages

This course approaches the teaching of second languages from a learning perspective. In other words, it eschews the traditional focus on ¿teaching methods¿ and emphasizes instructional decision-making within the context of learners¿ intellectual and linguistic development. The course is designed to prepare language instructors to teach languages at the beginning and intermediate levels in a variety of university settings to an array of populations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bernhardt-Kamil, E. (PI)

DLCL 311: Professional Workshop

Meets regularly throughout the year to discuss issues in the professional study of literature. Topics include the academic job market and the challenges of research and teaching at different types of institutions. Supervised by the graduate affairs committee of the DLCL. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kassabova, B. (PI)

DLCL 333: Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar (ENGLISH 333, PHIL 333)

This course serves as the Core Seminar for the PhD Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. It introduces students to a wide range of topics at the intersection of philosophy with literary and arts criticism. In this year's installment of the seminar, we will focus on issues about the nature of fiction, about the experience of appreciation and what it does for us, about the ethical consequences of imaginative fictions, and about different conceptions of the importance of the arts in life more broadly. The seminar is intended for graduate students. It is suitable for theoretically ambitious students of literature and the arts, philosophers with interests in value theory, aesthetics, and topics in language and mind, and other students with strong interest in the psychological importance of engagement with the arts. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hills, D. (PI)
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