Print Settings
 

NATIVEAM 5A: Muwekma House Seminar

Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wilcox, M. (PI)

NATIVEAM 5B: Muwekma House Seminar

Second Quarter of Muwekma House Seminar.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wilcox, M. (PI)

NATIVEAM 14: Indigenous Peoples in Film and Visual Media: Reframing Narratives of Race, Gender and Personhood

This class explores the multiple valences of Indigenous Peoples within the genre of visual media and film with articular attention to race and gender as reflective and reflexive categories. Using the lenses of, anthropology, postcolonial, Indigenous and Gender Studies this course will examine the ways in which the imagery of indigenous peoples has been woven into Western narratives, appropriated as projections of Western masculinity and in more recent years reclaimed by indigenous filmmakers and documentarians. The format of the class will involve a "flipped classroom" pedagogy, weekly screenings and closely supervised student presentations on topics related to the course. Weekly screenings of films, lectures and discussions will require mandatory attendance at every class meeting and within working groups. Students will develop skills to identify visual media referents, related to contemporary and digital contexts while gaining appreciation for indigenous identity history and sovereignty weekly reflection papers are required. No previous film studies experience is necessary.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wilcox, M. (PI)

NATIVEAM 16: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 16, ARCHLGY 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 39: Long Live Our 4Bil. Year Old Mother: Black Feminist Praxis, Indigenous Resistance, Queer Possibility (AFRICAAM 39, CSRE 39, FEMGEN 39)

How can art facilitate a culture that values women, mothers, transfolks, caregivers, girls? How can black, indigenous, and people of color frameworks help us reckon with oppressive systems that threaten safety and survival for marginalized people and the lands that sustain us? How can these questions reveal the brilliant and inventive forms of survival that precede and transcend harmful systems toward a world of possibility? Each week, this course will call on artists, scholars, and organizers of color who clarify the urgency and interconnection of issues from patriarchal violence to environmental degradation; criminalization to legacies of settler colonialism. These same thinkers will also speak to the imaginative, everyday knowledge and creative healing practices that our forebears have used for millennia to give vision and rise to true transformation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 50Q: Life and Death of Words (CSRE 50Q, ENGLISH 50Q, FEMGEN 50Q)

In this course, we explore the world of words: their creation, evolution, borrowing, change, and death. Words are the key to understanding the culture and ideas of a people, and by tracing the biographies of words we are able to discern how the world was, is, and might be perceived and described. We trace how words are formed, and how they change in pronunciation, spelling, meaning, and usage over time. How does a word get into the dictionary? What do words reveal about status, class, region, and race? How is the language of men and women critiqued differently within our society? How does slang evolve? How do languages become endangered or die, and what is lost when they do? We will visit the Facebook Content Strategy Team and learn more about the role words play in shaping our online experiences. Together, the class will collect Stanford language and redesign the digital dictionary of the future. Trigger Warning: Some of the subject matter of this course is sensitive and may cause offense. Please consider this prior to enrolling in the course.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 57A: Cherokee Language Lab

This course is intended for students who have already completed First Year Cherokee and would like to continue their exposure, learning, and understanding of the language.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

NATIVEAM 103S: Gender in Native American Societies (CSRE 103S, FEMGEN 103S)

Seminar examines the impact of colonialism on gender roles & gender relations in American Indian communities beginning with the 17th century to the present. Topics include demographic changes; social, political & economic transformations associated with biological & spiritual assaults; the dynamism & diversity of native societies. Sources include history, ethnography, biography, autobiography, the novel & film.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 108S: American Indian Religious Freedom (CSRE 108S)

The persistence of tribal spiritual beliefs and practices in light of legal challenges (sacred geography and the 1st Amendment), treatment of the dead and sacred objects (repatriation), consumerism (New Age commodification), and cultural intellectual property protection (trademark, copyright, patent law). Focus is on contemporary issues and cases, analyzed through interdisciplinary scholarship and practical strategies to protect the fundamental liberty of American Indian religious freedom.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 109A: Federal Indian Law (CSRE 109A)

Cases, legislation, comparative justice models, and historical and cultural material. The interlocking relationships of tribal, federal, and state governments. Emphasis is on economic development, religious freedom, and environmental justice issues in Indian country.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Biestman, K. (PI)

NATIVEAM 109B: Native Nation Building (CSRE 109B)

The history of competing tribal and Western economic models, and the legal, political, social, and cultural implications for tribal economic development. Case studies include mineral resource extraction, gaming, and cultural tourism. 21st-century strategies for sustainable economic development and protection of political and cultural sovereignty.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 111B: Muwekma: Landscape Archaeology and the Narratives of California Natives (ANTHRO 111C, ARCHLGY 111B)

This course explores the unique history of San Francisco Bay Area tribes with particular attention to Muwekma Ohlone- the descendent community associated with the landscape surrounding and including Stanford University. The story of Muwekma provides a window into the history of California Indians from prehistory to Spanish exploration and colonization, the role of Missionaries and the controversial legacy of Junipero Serra, Indigenous rebellions throughout California, citizenship and land title during the 19th century, the historical role of anthropology and archaeology in shaping policy and recognition of Muwekma, and the fight for acknowledgement of Muwekma as a federally recognized tribe. We will visit local sites associated with this history and participate in field surveys of the landscape of Muwekma.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wilcox, M. (PI)

NATIVEAM 115: Introduction to Native American History

This course incorporates a Native American perspective in the assigned readings and is an introduction to Native American History from contact with Europeans to the present. History, from a Western perspective, is secular and objectively evaluative whereas for most Indigenous peoples, history is a moral endeavor (Walker, Lakota Society 113). A focus in the course is the civil rights era in American history when Native American protest movements were active. Colonization and decolonization, as they historically occurred are an emphasis throughout the course using texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century in addition to the main text. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and one longer paper that is summarized in a 15-20 minute presentation on a topic of interest relating to the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Red Shirt, D. (PI)

NATIVEAM 116: Decolonizing the Indigenous Classroom (CSRE 116, CSRE 302, EDUC 186, EDUC 286)

Using Indigenous and decolonizing perspectives on education, this interdisciplinary course will examine interaction and language in cross-cultural educational situations, including language, literacy and interethnic communication as they relate to Indigenous American classrooms. Special attention will be paid to implications of social, cultural and linguistic diversity for educational practice, along with various strategies for bridging intercultural differences between schools and Native communities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 117S: History of California Indians (CSRE 117S, HISTORY 250A)

Demographic, political, and economic history of California Indians, 1700s-1950s. Processes and events leading to the destruction of California tribes, and their effects on the groups who survived. Geographic and cultural diversity. Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo-American periods. The mission system.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 118: Heritage, Environment, and Sovereignty in Hawaii (CSRE 118E, EARTHSYS 118)

This course explores the cultural, political economic, and environmental status of contemporary Hawaiians. What sorts of sustainable economic and environmental systems did Hawaiians use in prehistory? How was colonization of the Hawaiian Islands informed and shaped by American economic interests and the nascent imperialsm of the early 20th centrury? How was sovereignty and Native Hawaiian identity been shaped by these forces? How has tourism and the leisure industry affected the natural environment? This course uses archaeological methods, ethnohistorical sources, and historical analysis in an exploration of contemporary Hawaiian social economic and political life.
Terms: alternate years, not given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 119S: History of American Indian & Alaska Native Education (EDUC 119S, EDUC 429S)

How the federal government placed education at the center of its Indian policy in second half of 19th century, subjecting Native Americans to programs designed to erase native cultures and American Indian responses to those programs. Topics include traditional Indian education, role of religious groups, Meriam Report, Navajo-Hopi Rehabilitation Act, Johnson-O'Malley Act, and public schools.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, J. (PI)

NATIVEAM 121: Discourse of the Colonized: Native American and Indigenous Voices (CSRE 121)

Using the assigned texts covering the protest movements in the 20th century to the texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century, students will engage in discussions on decolonization. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and a 15-20 minute presentation on the topic of interest relating to decolonization for Native Americans in one longer paper. Approaching research from an Indigenous perspective will be encouraged throughout.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Red Shirt, D. (PI)

NATIVEAM 122: Historiography & Native American Oral Traditions and Narratives

This course is an introduction to Native American Literature in the United States in a (post) colonial, or decolonized context (in the last seventy years). The readings focus on the complex social and political influences that have shaped Native American literature in the last half of the twentieth century to the present. It is an introduction to nNative American fiction, poetry, drama, nonfiction and autobiography. It draws on the historical (literary sovereignty) and theoretical frameworks (American Indian Literary Nationalism) used by Native American writers in the United States; how trends in Native American writing build on and integrate traditional modes of Native American nstorytelling (oral tradition & the verbal arts). It takes a specific in - depth look at Native American oral tradition. Where the overarching aim of the course is to address the nquestion: How do you define Native American literature? Students will be required to provide their own definition from what they learn about Native American oral tradition and the challenges (historic and otherwise) inherent in a (post) colonial or decolonized world for Native Americans.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Red Shirt, D. (PI)

NATIVEAM 123A: American Indians and the Cinema (CSRE 123A)

Hollywood and the film industry have had a major influence on American society for nearly a century. Initially designed to provide entertainment, the cinema broadened its impact by creating images perceived as real and essentialist. Hollywood's Indians have been the main source of information about who American Indians are and Hollywood has helped shape inaccurate and stereotypical perceptions that continue to exist today. This course looks chronologically at cinematic interpretations and critically examines accurate portrayals of American Indians and of American history.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 126: Mo'olelo Aloha Aina: Hawaiian Perspectives on Storytelling, Land, and Sovereignty

This course will introduce a wide variety of topics pertaining to the culture and history of the Hawaiian Islands and the aboriginal people of Hawai¿i (k¿naka maoli). Topics will range from Hawaiian perspectives on genealogies, Hawaiian conceptions of land governance, brief overview of Hawaiian Kingdom history, case studies of modern Hawaiian activism, and more. Students will be introduced to surface-level coverage of included topics through a variety of readings and interactive assignments.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wilcox, M. (PI)

NATIVEAM 132: Decolonizing the American Indigenous Classroom

Using Indigenous and decolonizing perspectives on education, this interdisciplinary course will examine interaction and language in cross-cultural educational situations, including language, literacy and interethnic communication as they relate to Indigenous American classrooms. Special attention will be paid to implications of social, cultural and linguistic diversity for educational practice, along with various strategies for bridging intercultural differences between schools and Native communities.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 139: American Indians in Contemporary Society (SOC 139, SOC 239)

(Graduate students register for 239.) The social position of American Indians in contemporary American society, 1890 to the present. The demographic resurgence of American Indians, changes in social and economic status, ethnic identification and political mobilization, and institutions such as tribal governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Recommended: 138 or a course in American history.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 143A: American Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore (AMSTUD 143M, ENGLISH 43A, ENGLISH 143A)

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143A.) Readings from American Indian literatures, old and new. Stories, songs, and rituals from the 19th century, including the Navajo Night Chant. Tricksters and trickster stories; war, healing, and hunting songs; Aztec songs from the 16th century. Readings from modern poets and novelists including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko, and the classic autobiography, "Black Elk Speaks."
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 161: Entrepreneurship for Social and Racial Equity (CSRE 161P)

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to business ownership with a focus on owning and operating businesses within diverse communities with an aim to create social impact for future generations as well as profitability and sustainability models. The course will introduce the beginning elements of creating a business (formation, product, business plan) as well as the additional overlay of social impact and cultural considerations. Types of financing as well as effective pitching will also be covered. Course materials will include instructor presentations, case studies, homework assignments, outside hours at campus ¿labs¿, creation of students¿ own business concept plan and guest lectures from successful entrepreneurs working within Silicon Valley and diverse communities. Resources (financing sources, accelerators and incubators), case studies, role models and guest lecturers will be an integral part of this course which can lead to internship opportunities (the latter via application).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; RED-HORSE MOHL, V. (PI)

NATIVEAM 162: Tribal Economic Development and Sustainability

Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Inuit are disproportionately on the forefront of climate change and are being forced to adapt to climate change now. One of the biggest challenges Indigenous Nations face is building sustainable businesses that respect the environment while providing for current and future generations. This course will survey environmental, regulatory, political and financing issues associated with economic development on tribal, Alaska Native and Inuit lands. We will examine Indigenous business success stories as well as an overview of major challenges to building sustainable businesses. We will engage with Indigenous leaders and industry experts to discuss the challenges of building businesses that provide jobs and economic opportunities for Indigenous communities now while also taking into account the responsibilities Indigenous leadership has to future generations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marquez, R. (PI)

NATIVEAM 170: Introduction to American Indian Literature (CSRE 170)

This course provides a general introduction to American Indian literatures, beginning with early translations, including oral literatures and autobiographies, and continuing with contemporary poetry and fiction written by American Indian writers. We will want to pay particular attention to the American Indian writers¿ connections to a specific locale or place. In what ways are the stories and poems evocative of a long-standing relationship to a "home landscape"? What is the nature of the relationship? How is that relationship to place similar to or different from our own? At the same time, we will want to pay attention to the nature and scope of the various representations of American Indians in the texts we examine, and ask how the representations reinforce and/or dispel popular and often stereotypical images of American Indian people. Finally, we will want to be aware of and understand our position as readers, particularly as readers who come from and are constituted by historical, social, political, cultural, and ethnic worlds different from or similar to the worlds we find in the books that we are reading.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 200R: Directed Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 200W: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 211: The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation (ARTHIST 211, CSRE 111)

Sites of the spirit and devotion, sites of genocide, foreboding actors in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, the subject of fourth-grade school projects, the Spanish Missions of Alta California are complex sites of inquiry, their meanings and associations different for each visitor. This seminar examines the art and architecture of the California Missions built between 1769 and 1823. Constructed with local materials and decorated with reredos, paintings and sculptures from Mexico and Spain, the Missions are at once humble spaces and flagships of a belated global baroque. They were also the laboratories of indigenous artists and artisans. This course seeks to understand how Mission art was meant to function, how and why it was made, what its materials were, while asking what the larger role of art was in a global system of missions. Can the study of this art lead to the reconciliation of populations in North America and within the field of art history? The Missions require a specific reexamination of the relationship between European and colonial forms, not as objects of curiosity or diffusion but as viable and globally informed agents.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 221: Crafting Challenging Conversations in a Conflicted World (CSRE 221D)

In moments of divisive, time-sensitive conflict and disagreement, interdependent community groups that are we-us oriented often struggle to maintain cohesive relationships. In this interactive, project-based course, participants will dive into the art of designing new products, services, or experiences for conflict. Throughout the course, participants can expect to unpack the fundamentals of design thinking and components of strong listening, leadership, and effective cultural competency. Individual one-on-one conversations as well as indigenous forms of group-interviewing, known as Peacemaking and Ho'oponopono, will be also explored. At the end of the course, students can expect to have created a low-resolution prototype based on qualitative research that answers the question: How might we lead with community-centered approaches, rather than with independent, divisive reactions in moments of conflict?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 240: Psychology and American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health (EDUC 340, PSYCH 272)

Western medicine's definition of health as the absence of sickness, disease, or pathology; Native American cultures' definition of health as the beauty of physical, spiritual, emotional, and social things, and sickness as something out of balance. Topics include: historical trauma; spirituality and healing; cultural identity; values and acculturation; and individual, school, and community-based interventions. Prerequisite: experience working with American Indian communities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 255: Native American Identity in the American Imagination: 19th Century to Present

Because cultural identity is similar to and overlaps with identity politics, this course will examine Native American identity in current culture through American imagination and perspective as to what it is to be Native American today. Historic perspectives from the 19th century to the present will be covered as well.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints