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CLASSICS 1G: Beginning Greek

No knowledge of Greek is assumed. Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: ; Powell, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 1L: Beginning Latin

Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language. No previous knowledge of Latin is assumed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: ; Ten-Hove, L. (PI)

CLASSICS 11G: Intermediate Greek: Prose

Transition to reading Greek prose. Students will build upon knowledge of morphology and syntax acquired in beginning Greek to develop confidence and proficiency in reading a variety of Greek texts from mythology to selections of classical and biblical prose.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Martin, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 11L: Intermediate Latin: Introduction to Literature

Phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax. Readings in prose and poetry, including Nepos (Life of Hannibal), Cicero, Catullus, and more. Analysis of literary language, including rhythm, meter, word order, narrative, and figures of speech.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Mallon, K. (PI)

CLASSICS 12N: Income and wealth inequality from the Stone Age to the present (HISTORY 12N)

Rising inequality is a defining feature of our time. How long has economic inequality existed, and when, how and why has the gap between haves and have-nots widened or narrowed over the course of history? This seminar takes a very long-term view of these questions. It is designed to help you appreciate dynamics and complexities that are often obscured by partisan controversies and short-term perspectives, and to provide solid historical background for a better understanding of a growing societal concern.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Scheidel, W. (PI)

CLASSICS 17N: To Die For: Antigone and Political Dissent (TAPS 12N)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 6N.) Preference to freshmen. Tensions inherent in the democracy of ancient Athens; how the character of Antigone emerges in later drama, film, and political thought as a figure of resistance against illegitimate authority; and her relevance to contemporary struggles for women's and workers' rights and national liberation. Readings and screenings include versions of Antigone by Sophocles, Anouilh, Brecht, Fugard/Kani/Ntshona, Paulin, Glowacki, Gurney, and von Trotta.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-ER
Instructors: ; Kimmel, A. (PI); Rehm, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 26N: The Roman Empire: Its Grandeur and Fall (HISTORY 11N)

Preference to freshmen. Explore themes on the Roman Empire and its decline from the 1st through the 5th centuries C.E.. What was the political and military glue that held this diverse, multi-ethnic empire together? What were the bases of wealth and how was it distributed? What were the possibilities and limits of economic growth? How integrated was it in culture and religion? What were the causes and consequences of the conversion to Christianity? Why did the Empire fall in the West? How suitable is the analogy of the U.S. in the 21st century?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:IHUM-3, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Saller, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 31: Greek Mythology

The heroic and divine in the literature, mythology, and culture of archaic Greece. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of individuals and society. Illustrated lectures. Readings in translation of Homer, Hesiod, and the poets of lyric and tragedy. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required during regular academic quarters (Aut, Win, Spr)
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 37: Great Books, Big Ideas from Ancient Greece and Rome (DLCL 11, HUMCORE 112)

This course will journey through ancient Greek and Roman literature from Homer to St. Augustine, in constant conversation with the other HumCore travelers in the Ancient Middle East, Africa and South Asia, and Early China. It will introduce participants to some of its fascinating features and big ideas (such as the idea of history); and it will reflect on questions including: What is an honorable life? Who is the Other? How does a society fall apart? Where does human subjectivity fit into a world of matter, cause and effect? Should art serve an exterior purpose? Do we have any duties to the past? This course is part of the Humanities Core, a collaborative set of global humanities seminars that brings all of its students and faculty into conversation. On Mondays you meet in your own course, and on Wednesdays all the HumCore seminars (in session that quarter) meet together: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Krebs, C. (PI)

CLASSICS 40: The History of Ancient Greek Philosophy (PHIL 100)

We shall cover the major developments in Greek philosophical thought, focusing on Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic schools (the Epicureans, the Stoics, and the Skeptics). Topics include epistemology, metaphysics, psychology, ethics and political theory. No prereqs, not repeatable.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 42: Philosophy and Literature (COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ILAC 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 76: Global History: The Ancient World (HISTORY 1A)

World history from the origins of humanity to the Black Death. Focuses on the evolution of complex societies, wealth, violence, hierarchy, and large-scale belief systems.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 81: Ancient Empires: Near East (HISTORY 117)

Why do imperialists conquer people? Why do some people resist while others collaborate? This course tries to answer these questions by looking at some of the world's earliest empires. The main focus is on the expansion of the Assyrian and Persian Empires between 900 and 300 BC and the consequences for the ancient Jews, Egyptians, and Greeks. The main readings come from the Bible, Herodotus, and Assyrian and Persian royal inscriptions, and the course combines historical and archaeological data with social scientific approaches. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CLASSICS 101G: Advanced Greek: Sophocles

Set at the end of the Trojan War, Sophocles' Ajax enacts the final hours of the second-greatest Greek hero. The play will act as a jumping-off point for discussions of the form and role of tragedy in 5th century BCE Athenian society, ancient depictions of mental illness, and the mirrored engagement of modern audiences with the Ajax and Sophocles' engagement with the Homeric tradition. We will read the play in its original Greek, with review of syntax, vocabulary, prosody, and historical context as needed. (Content note: this play depicts suicide.) Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Ten-Hove, L. (PI)

CLASSICS 101L: Advanced Latin: Communication is Key. Cicero's De oratore

Why should we care about (the art of) speaking well? How do we perfect it, and towards what ideal? These are the questions Marcus Tullius Cicero explores in his rhetorical and philosophical masterpiece of 55BC. A fictional dialogue of historical characters, including the greatest speakers of Cicero's adolescence, Marcus Antonius and Lucius L. Crassus, it is set in 91 before a darkening background of civil unrest (and worse). Evoking Plato's Phaedrus, anticipating his own situation in the 50s, Cicero weaves together a beautiful discussion of what we should all care about. We'll read De oratore in selection, a few letters and excerpts from his other works, along with chapters from Fantham's The Roman World and Rawson's intellectual biography. Classics majors and minors must take for a letter grade and may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Krebs, C. (PI)

CLASSICS 113: Enchanted Images: Medieval Art and Its Sonic Dimension (ARTHIST 205, ARTHIST 405, CLASSICS 313, MUSIC 205, MUSIC 405)

Explores the relationship between chant and images in medieval art. Examples are sourced from both Byzantium and the Latin West including the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, Hagia Sophia in Constantinople, Ste. Foy at Conques, and Santiago de Compostela. We will explore how music sharpens the perception of the spatial, visual programs and liturgical objects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: ; Pentcheva, B. (PI)

CLASSICS 115: Virtual Italy (ARCHLGY 117, ENGLISH 115, HISTORY 238C, ITALIAN 115)

Classical Italy attracted thousands of travelers throughout the 1700s. Referring to their journey as the "Grand Tour," travelers pursued intellectual passions, promoted careers, and satisfied wanderlust, all while collecting antiquities to fill museums and estates back home. What can computational approaches tell us about who traveled, where and why? We will read travel accounts; experiment with parsing; and visualize historical data. Final projects to form credited contributions to the Grand Tour Project, a cutting-edge digital platform. No prior programming experience necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 152: The Ancient Anthropocene: An Unnatural History of Roman Environments (ARCHLGY 152A)

This course will reflect on the significance of the Anthropocene over the short- and long-term by casting an environmental lens on the archaeology and history of Rome. It will draw from diverse paleo-environmental, archaeological, art historical, and ancient textual evidence to: interrogate Roman mentalities towards the environment; investigate how Roman technologies and organizational systems enabled the Romans¿ ability to bring about enduring ecological transformations; and explore the confluence of socio-political events and natural phenomena. This course has two objectives: first, to learn the role of the environment in the history of Rome, and vice versa; and second, to compare the Romans¿ relationship with the environment to our own, in particular how ideas, tools, and structures affect our interactions with the natural world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Pickel, D. (PI)

CLASSICS 161: Introduction to Greek Art I: The Archaic Period (ARTHIST 101)

The class considers the development of Greek art from 1000-480 and poses the question, how Greek was Greek art? In the beginning, as Greece emerges from 200 years of Dark Ages, their art is cautious, conservative and more abstract than life-like, closer to Calder than Michelangelo. While Homer describes the rippling muscles (and egos) of Bronze Age heroes, his fellow painters and sculptors prefer abstraction. This changes in the 7th century, when travel to and trade with the Near East transform Greek culture. What had been an insular society becomes cosmopolitan, enriched by the sophisticated artistic traditions of lands beyond the Aegean "frog pond." Imported Near Eastern bronzes and ivories awaken Greek artists to a wider range of subjects, techniques and ambitions. Later in the century, Greeks in Egypt learn to quarry and carve hard stone from Egyptian masters. Throughout the 6th century, Greek artists absorb what they had borrowed, compete with one another, defy their teachers, test the tolerance of the gods and eventually produce works of art that speak with a Greek accent. By the end of the archaic period, images of gods and mortals bear little trace of alien influence or imprint, yet without the contributions of Egypt and the Near East, Greek art as we know it would have been unthinkable.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 163: Artists, Athletes, Courtesans and Crooks (ARTHIST 203)

The seminar examines a range of topics devoted to the makers of Greek art and artifacts, the men and women who used them in life and the afterlife, and the miscreants - from Lord Elgin to contemporary tomb-looters and dealers - whose deeds have damaged, deracinated and desecrated temples, sculptures and grave goods. Readings include ancient texts in translation, books and articles by classicists and art historians, legal texts and lively page-turners. Students will discuss weekly readings, give brief slide lectures and a final presentation on a topic of their choice, which need not be confined to the ancient Mediterranean.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 186: African Archive Beyond Colonization (AFRICAST 117, ARCHLGY 166, CLASSICS 286, CSRE 166)

From street names to monuments, the material sediments of colonial time can be seen, heard, and felt in the diverse cultural archives of ancient and contemporary Africa. This seminar aims to examine the role of ethnographic practice in the political agendas of past and present African nations. In the quest to reconstruct an imaginary of Africa in space and time, students will explore these social constructs in light of the rise of archaeology during the height of European empire and colonization. Particularly in the last 50 years, revived interest in African cultural heritage and preservation raises complex questions about the problematic tensions between European, American, and African theories of archaeological and ethnographic practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: ; Derbew, S. (PI); Lim, D. (PI)

CLASSICS 199: Undergraduate Thesis: Senior Research

(Formerly CLASSGEN 199.) May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 201G: Greek Core 1: Plato, Isocrates, and Aristotle on Poetry and Education

Students will do close readings of Plato's Symposium, Republic 2, 3 and 10, Isocrates' Antidosis, and Aristotle's Poetics and Politics 8. Students will translate and analyze the Greek and gain a solid mastery of these texts in terms of diction, syntax, and style. Students will also read secondary literature on these authors/texts and present oral reports. In this class, we will examine how these philosophers treat the literary, educational, and political aspects of poetry. We will analyze these texts in terms of genre, discourse, and philosophical ideas. We will locate these philosophers in the socio-political context of democratic Athens. How do the different prose genres that they use--a dialogue, an autobiographical speech, and a treatise--address the power and perils of poetry? How do these thinkers valorize the discipline of philosophy as the best mode of education? Greek and Latin material taught in alternate years.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Nightingale, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 219: Methods and approaches for ancient historians

The interests and evidence used by classical historians have evolved over the past 50 years from a discipline based largely on literary texts and interested in political and military history. In recent decades interest have shifted to include a heavier emphasis on economic, social and cultural history encompassing issues of gender, cultural representation and identity, and economic performance. Whereas the traditional historiography of the earlier 20th c largely coincided with our elite male-authored texts, the newer interests require different types of evidence and analytic skills. This proseminar offers a very brief exposure to a wide range of approaches and evidence, including demography, numismatics, material culture, epigraphy, law, and digital tools. The expectation is that you will identify those that you will need for your research and will pursue them in future coursework or summer workshops.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CLASSICS 240: Historiography (HISTORY 304M)

For History and Classics MA and coterm students. This course explores how historians have explored the past, and the strengths and limits of the methods they have employed. Beginning with a survey of non-western historiography, we then investigate the modern formulation of the historical discipline and its continuing evolution. What is the basis of our claims to know the past, and how can we better sift and gauge these claims? How can we better understand the historian's changing role in a changing society?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: ; Rohan, P. (PI)

CLASSICS 273: Hagia Sophia (ARTHIST 208, ARTHIST 408, CLASSICS 173)

This seminar uncovers the aesthetic principles and spiritual operations at work in Hagia Sophia, the church dedicated to Holy Wisdom in Constantinople. Rather than a static and inert structure, the Great Church emerges as a material body that comes to life when the morning or evening light resurrects the glitter of its gold mosaics and when the singing of human voices activates the reverberant and enveloping sound of its vast interior. Drawing on art and architectural history, liturgy, musicology, and acoustics, this course explores the Byzantine paradigm of animation arguing that it is manifested in the visual and sonic mirroring, in the chiastic structure of the psalmody, and in the prosody of the sung poetry. Together these elements orchestrate a multi-sensory experience that has the potential to destabilize the divide between real and oneiric, placing the faithful in a space in between terrestrial and celestial. A short film on aesthetics and samples of Byzantine chant digitally imprinted with the acoustics of Hagia Sophia are developed as integral segments of this research; they offer a chance for the student to transcend the limits of textual analysis and experience the temporal dimension of this process of animation of the inert.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

CLASSICS 286: African Archive Beyond Colonization (AFRICAST 117, ARCHLGY 166, CLASSICS 186, CSRE 166)

From street names to monuments, the material sediments of colonial time can be seen, heard, and felt in the diverse cultural archives of ancient and contemporary Africa. This seminar aims to examine the role of ethnographic practice in the political agendas of past and present African nations. In the quest to reconstruct an imaginary of Africa in space and time, students will explore these social constructs in light of the rise of archaeology during the height of European empire and colonization. Particularly in the last 50 years, revived interest in African cultural heritage and preservation raises complex questions about the problematic tensions between European, American, and African theories of archaeological and ethnographic practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Derbew, S. (PI); Lim, D. (PI)

CLASSICS 297: Dissertation Proposal Preparation

This course is to be taken twice during the third year of the Classics PhD program. It takes the form of a tutorial based on weekly meetings, leading to the writing of the dissertation prospectus. To register, a student obtain permission from the prospective faculty advisor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit (up to 99 units total)

CLASSICS 298: Directed Reading in Classics (Graduate Students)

This course is offered for students requiring specialized training in an area not covered by existing courses. To register, a student must obtain permission from the Classics Department and the faculty member who is willing to supervise the reading. This course can be repeated for credit, not to exceed 20 units total.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit (up to 20 units total)

CLASSICS 303: The Proverb in Ancient Greek Literature

This course explores the use of the proverb in ancient Greek poetry and prose. We will examine the role proverbs play across the many different genres of Greek literature as part of a larger 'quotation culture' in antiquity, as evinced in oral performance, ancient reading habits, and educational practices. Part of our study will involve tracing the use, reuse, and transformation of certain proverbs to the extent that they become autonomous literary works in their own right. This will lead us to consider what separates a 'quotation' from other discourse. Does anyone ever speak without 'quoting' something? Texts include selections from Homer, Hesiod, Greek lyric poetry (e.g., Pindar), Greek tragedy and comedy, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Plutarch.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: ; Tennant, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 313: Enchanted Images: Medieval Art and Its Sonic Dimension (ARTHIST 205, ARTHIST 405, CLASSICS 113, MUSIC 205, MUSIC 405)

Explores the relationship between chant and images in medieval art. Examples are sourced from both Byzantium and the Latin West including the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, Hagia Sophia in Constantinople, Ste. Foy at Conques, and Santiago de Compostela. We will explore how music sharpens the perception of the spatial, visual programs and liturgical objects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: ; Pentcheva, B. (PI)

CLASSICS 365: Digital Humanities Methods for Classics

This course will introduce students to methods for computationally analyzing literary, archaeological and historical evidence from the ancient Mediterranean world. Students will acquire programming skills in Python and experience with data science practices, while reading and discussing foundational essays in digital humanities as well as case studies of digital research in classics. Final projects will offer students' the opportunity to explore acquired skills in their areas of interest. No prior programming experience required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5

CLASSICS 399: Graduate Research in Classics

For graduate students only. Individual research by arrangement with in-department instructors. To register, a student must obtain permission from the faculty member who is willing to supervise the research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
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