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ARTHIST 116N: Making Sense of the World: Art, Medicine, and Science in Venice

In 1500 Venice was the place you wanted to be. It wasn't just the capital of the world: it was also its scientific center. This course explores the conversation between the arts and the sciences in Renaissance Venice, and, thanks to remote teaching, it will do so from Venice! Students will discover the oldest anatomical theatre and many of Venice's arresting paintings to reflect on the blurred distinction between art and science, questioning if such a divide makes sense today.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

ARTHIST 119: Love at First Sight: Visual Desire, Attraction, and the Pleasures of Art (ARTHIST 319, FRENCH 149, FRENCH 349, ITALIAN 149, ITALIAN 349)

Why do dating sites rely on photographs? Why do we believe that love is above all a visual force? How is pleasure, even erotic pleasure, achieved through looking? While the psychology of impressions offers some answers, this course uncovers the ways poets, songwriters, and especially artists have explored myths and promoted ideas about the coupling of love and seeing. Week by week, we will be reflecting on love as political critique, social disruption, and magical force. And we will do so by examining some of the most iconic works of art, from Dante's writings on lovesickness to Caravaggio's Narcissus, studying the ways that objects have shifted from keepsakes to targets of our cares. While exploring the visual roots and evolutions of what has become one of life's fundamental drives, this course offers a passionate survey of European art from Giotto's kiss to Fragonard's swing that elicits stimulating questions about the sensorial nature of desire and the human struggle to control emotions.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 146: American Dream, American Nightmare: A History of the United States in Art and Literature

Studying the American past, a person could despair or dream or both. In this course, we will move chronologically from the Revolutionary War to the present to consider artists and writers--some famous, some obscure--who've portrayed hope, who've portrayed anger and grief, who've taken it upon themselves to make contact with life as they've experienced and imagined it. Throughout, we will treat art and literature not as an illustration of facts, and not as a solution to social problems, but as a touchstone to who Americans have been and who they might become.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4

ARTHIST 242B: Megacities (ANTHRO 42, LIFE 142, URBANST 142)

This class will examine a variety of ways that the city has been represented and understood in anthropology, architecture, literature, film, and journalism in order to better understand how everyday life and experience has been read in conjunction with urban forms. Issues covered will include the co-constitution of space and identities; consumption, spectacle, and economic disparity; transportation and health; colonialism and post-colonialism. Assignments will include writing and drawing projects based on close observation and reading.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Jain, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 245: Art, Business & the Law (SIW 245)

This course examines art at the intersection of business and the law from a number of different angles, focusing on how the issues raised by particular case studies, whether legal, ethical and/or financial, impact our understanding of how works of art circulate, are received, evaluated and acquire different meanings in given social contexts. Topics include the design, construction and contested signification of selected war memorials; the rights involved in the display and desecration of the American flag; censorship of sexually charged images; how the value of art is appraised; institutional critique and the art museum, among others.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 290: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 293A: Latin American Art and Literature: 100 Years of Modernisms (ILAC 126)

This course will explore some of the most important Latin American artists and artistic movements of the last century. We will appreciate and discuss artworks across different media like painting, sculpture, performance, or installations coupled with different literary texts. The artistic movements may include: Antropofagia (Brazil), Mexican Muralism, Tropicalia (Brazil), and Latin American Pop Art. Some of the artists that we will focus on are: Xul Solar (Argentina), Frida Kahlo (Mexico), Cecilia Vicuña (Chile), Adán Vallecillo (Honduras), Allora & Calzadilla (US/Cuba), and Tania Bruguera (Cuba). We will discuss their visual artworks alongside short stories by Jorge Luis Borges, Leonora Carrington, Julio Cortázar, Clarice Lispector, and Ted Chiang. Some guiding questions will be: What is art? What is Latin America? And what we talk about when we talk about Latin American art? Discussions and assignments in Spanish.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: ; Soler, C. (PI)

ARTHIST 295: Visual Arts Internship

Professional experience in a field related to the Visual Arts for six to ten weeks. Internships may include work for galleries, museums, art centers, and art publications. Students arrange the internship, provide a confirmation letter from the hosting institution, and must receive consent from the faculty coordinator to enroll in units. To supplement the internship students maintain a journal. Evaluations from the student and the supervisor, together with the journal, are submitted at the end of the internship. Restricted to declared majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

ARTHIST 319: Love at First Sight: Visual Desire, Attraction, and the Pleasures of Art (ARTHIST 119, FRENCH 149, FRENCH 349, ITALIAN 149, ITALIAN 349)

Why do dating sites rely on photographs? Why do we believe that love is above all a visual force? How is pleasure, even erotic pleasure, achieved through looking? While the psychology of impressions offers some answers, this course uncovers the ways poets, songwriters, and especially artists have explored myths and promoted ideas about the coupling of love and seeing. Week by week, we will be reflecting on love as political critique, social disruption, and magical force. And we will do so by examining some of the most iconic works of art, from Dante's writings on lovesickness to Caravaggio's Narcissus, studying the ways that objects have shifted from keepsakes to targets of our cares. While exploring the visual roots and evolutions of what has become one of life's fundamental drives, this course offers a passionate survey of European art from Giotto's kiss to Fragonard's swing that elicits stimulating questions about the sensorial nature of desire and the human struggle to control emotions.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5

ARTHIST 620: Qualifying Examination Preparation

For Art History Ph.D. candidates. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 24 units total)

ARTHIST 650: Dissertation Research

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 24 units total)

ARTHIST 660: Independent Study

For graduate students only. Approved independent research projects with individual faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

ARTHIST 680: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree. Prerequisite: Art History Ph.D. candidate.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
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