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JAPAN 24: Humanities Core: How to be Modern in East Asia (CHINA 24, COMPLIT 44, HUMCORE 133, KOREA 24)

Modern East Asia was almost continuously convulsed by war and revolution in the 19th and 20th centuries. But the everyday experience of modernity was structured more profoundly by the widening gulf between the country and the city, economically, politically, and culturally. This course examines literary and cinematic works from China and Japan that respond to and reflect on the city/country divide, framing it against issues of class, gender, national identity, and ethnicity. It also explores changing ideas about home/hometown, native soil, the folk, roots, migration, enlightenment, civilization, progress, modernization, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and sustainability. All materials are in English. This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Galvane, L. (PI); Lee, H. (PI)

JAPAN 82N: Joys and Pains of Growing Up and Older in Japan

What do old and young people share in common? With a focus on Japan, a country with a large long-living population, this seminar spotlights older people's lives as a reflectiion of culture and society, history, and current social and personal changes. Through discussion of multidisciplinary studies on age, analysis of narratives, and films, we will gain a closer understanding of Japanese society and the multiple meanings of growing up and older. Students will also create a short video/audio profile of an older individual, and we will explore cross-cultural comparisons. Held in Knight Bldg. Rm. 201.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Matsumoto, Y. (PI)

JAPAN 138: Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture (JAPAN 238)

This class introduces key literary texts from Japan¿s modern era (1868-present), locating these works in the larger political, social, and cultural trends of the period. nThe goal of the class is to use literary texts as a point of entry to understand the grand narrative of Japan's journey from its tentative re-entry into the international community in the 1850s, through the cataclysm of the Pacific War, the remarkable prosperity of the bubble years in the 1980s until most recent, post-3/11 catastrophe-evoked Zeitgeist.nnWe will examine a variety of primary texts by such authors as Futabatei Shimei, Higuchi Ichiy¿, Natsume S¿seki, Tanizaki Jun¿ichir¿, Miyamoto Yuriko, Kawabata Yasunari, ¿e Kenzabur¿, Yoshimoto Banana, Tawada Y¿ko, and Yu Miri among others. Each text will be discussed in detail paying attention to its specific character and contextualized within larger political trends (e.g., the modernization program of the Meiji regime, the policies of Japan's wartime government, and postwar Japanese responses to the cold war), social developments (e.g., changing notions of social class, the women's rights movement, the social effects of the postwar economic expansion, ecocriticism), and cultural movements (e.g., literary reform movement of the 1890s, modernism of the 1920s and 30s, postmodernism of the 1980s, and exophony). Students will also be encouraged to think about the ways these texts relate to each other and a variety of issues beyond the Japanese socio-cultural and historical context. nnNo prior knowledge of Japanese is required for this course, although students with sufficient proficiency are welcome to refer to original sources.nPrerequisites: None
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II

JAPAN 141: Japanese Performance Traditions (COMPLIT 218A, JAPAN 241)

Japanese performance traditions present a distinct challenge to modern Western concepts of gender, performance, self-expression, and even the human body itself. This course introduces the socio-historical underpinnings of these traditions, and invites students to engage in a fundamental questioning of the relationship between performance, gender, and cross-cultural interpretation. This course is designed for students with interests in performance, gender, and media as well as those with an interest in Japan. Genres covered include Noh, Kabuki, Bunraku, and Butoh.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5

JAPAN 151B: The Nature of Knowledge: Science and Literature in East Asia (CHINA 151B, CHINA 251B, JAPAN 251B, KOREA 151, KOREA 251)

"The Nature of Knowledge" explores the intersections of science and humanities East Asia. It covers a broad geographic area (China, Japan, and Korea) along a long temporal space (14th century - present) to investigate how historical notions about the natural world, the human body, and social order defied, informed, and constructed our current categories of science and humanities. The course will make use of medical, geographic, and cosmological treatises from premodern East Asia, portrayals and uses of science in modern literature, film, and media, as well as theoretical and historical essays on the relationships between literature, science, and society.nnAs part of its exploration of science and the humanities in conjunction, the course addresses how understandings of nature are mediated through techniques of narrative, rhetoric, visualization, and demonstration. In the meantime, it also examines how the emergence of modern disciplinary "science" influenced the development of literary language, tropes, and techniques of subject development. This class will expose the ways that science has been mobilized for various ideological projects and to serve different interests, and will produce insights into contemporary debates about the sciences and humanities.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: ; Zur, D. (PI)

JAPAN 163A: Beauty and Renunciation in Japan (HUMCORE 123)

Is it okay to feel pleasure? Should humans choose beauty or renunciation? This is the main controversy of medieval Japan. This course introduces students to the famous literary works that created a world of taste, subtlety, and sensuality. We also read essays that warn against the risks of leading a life of gratification, both in this life and in the afterlife. And we discover together the ways in which these two positions can be not that far from each other. Does love always lead to heartbreak? Is the appreciation of nature compatible with the truths of Buddhism? Is it good to have a family? What kind of house should we build for ourselves? Can fictional stories make us better persons? Each week, during the first class meeting, we will focus on these issues in Japan. During the second class meeting, we will participate in a collaborative conversation with the other students and faculty in Humanities Core classes, about other regions and issues. This course is taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Stilerman, A. (PI)

JAPAN 165: Readings in Premodern Japanese (JAPAN 265)

Edo and Meiji periods with focus on grammar and reading comprehension. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 246 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Stilerman, A. (PI)

JAPAN 188: The Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime (ARTHIST 287A, JAPAN 288)

The Japanese tea ceremony, the ultimate premodern multimedia phenomenon, integrates architecture, garden design, ceramics, painting, calligraphy, and other treasured objects into a choreographed ritual wherein host, objects, and guests perform designated roles on a tiny stage sometimes only six feet square.. In addition to its much-touted aesthetic and philosophical aspects, the practice of tea includes inevitable political and rhetorical dimensions. This course traces the evolution of tea practice from its inception within the milieu of courtier diversions, Zen monasteries, and warrior villas, through its various permutations into the 20th century, where it was manipulated by the emerging industrialist class for different-but ultimately similar-ends.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

JAPAN 189B: Honors Research

Open to senior honors students to write thesis.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

JAPAN 192: Analyzing Japanese Text and Talk (JAPAN 292)

Are there reasons why certain words, phrases, sentences and prosody are chosen by language speakers and writers in specific contexts? What linguistic and extra-linguistic elements give the hearers and readers the impression that certain utterances and passages are friendly, accusatory, officious, humorous, personal, formal, colloquial, etc.? This seminar provides an introduction to different theoretical and analytical approaches to studying language use in context (e.g. pragmatics, sociolinguistics, usage-based grammar, conversational analysis, critical discourse analysis) and an opportunity to critically analyze text and talk. Using the analytical tools acquired through readings and discussions, students will be able to analyze Japanese materials of their selection. The course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with interests either (or both) in Japanese linguistics and literature.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4
Instructors: ; Matsumoto, Y. (PI)

JAPAN 198C: Senior Research (Capstone Essay)

EALC students writing a Senior Capstone Essay who wish to conduct research with their adviser may enroll in this course for 1 unit, for 1 quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1

JAPAN 198H: Senior Research (Honors Thesis)

EALC juniors or seniors pursuing honors research should sign up for this course under their faculty adviser for research credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

JAPAN 199: Individual Reading in Japanese

Asian Languages majors only. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: JAPANLNG 129B or 103, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit

JAPAN 200: Directed Reading in Japanese

"Independent studies under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. Research will require some in-person access to archival materials in Hoover Institution, Stanford's East Asia Library, and/or Branner Map Collections. For EALC students; non-EALC students, should seek instructor permission before enrolling in section."
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

JAPAN 201: Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Study in Japanese

Bibliographical and research methods. Major trends in literary and cultural theory and critical practice. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 103 or 129B, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: ; Levy, I. (PI)

JAPAN 238: Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture (JAPAN 138)

This class introduces key literary texts from Japan¿s modern era (1868-present), locating these works in the larger political, social, and cultural trends of the period. nThe goal of the class is to use literary texts as a point of entry to understand the grand narrative of Japan's journey from its tentative re-entry into the international community in the 1850s, through the cataclysm of the Pacific War, the remarkable prosperity of the bubble years in the 1980s until most recent, post-3/11 catastrophe-evoked Zeitgeist.nnWe will examine a variety of primary texts by such authors as Futabatei Shimei, Higuchi Ichiy¿, Natsume S¿seki, Tanizaki Jun¿ichir¿, Miyamoto Yuriko, Kawabata Yasunari, ¿e Kenzabur¿, Yoshimoto Banana, Tawada Y¿ko, and Yu Miri among others. Each text will be discussed in detail paying attention to its specific character and contextualized within larger political trends (e.g., the modernization program of the Meiji regime, the policies of Japan's wartime government, and postwar Japanese responses to the cold war), social developments (e.g., changing notions of social class, the women's rights movement, the social effects of the postwar economic expansion, ecocriticism), and cultural movements (e.g., literary reform movement of the 1890s, modernism of the 1920s and 30s, postmodernism of the 1980s, and exophony). Students will also be encouraged to think about the ways these texts relate to each other and a variety of issues beyond the Japanese socio-cultural and historical context. nnNo prior knowledge of Japanese is required for this course, although students with sufficient proficiency are welcome to refer to original sources.nPrerequisites: None
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

JAPAN 241: Japanese Performance Traditions (COMPLIT 218A, JAPAN 141)

Japanese performance traditions present a distinct challenge to modern Western concepts of gender, performance, self-expression, and even the human body itself. This course introduces the socio-historical underpinnings of these traditions, and invites students to engage in a fundamental questioning of the relationship between performance, gender, and cross-cultural interpretation. This course is designed for students with interests in performance, gender, and media as well as those with an interest in Japan. Genres covered include Noh, Kabuki, Bunraku, and Butoh.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5

JAPAN 251B: The Nature of Knowledge: Science and Literature in East Asia (CHINA 151B, CHINA 251B, JAPAN 151B, KOREA 151, KOREA 251)

"The Nature of Knowledge" explores the intersections of science and humanities East Asia. It covers a broad geographic area (China, Japan, and Korea) along a long temporal space (14th century - present) to investigate how historical notions about the natural world, the human body, and social order defied, informed, and constructed our current categories of science and humanities. The course will make use of medical, geographic, and cosmological treatises from premodern East Asia, portrayals and uses of science in modern literature, film, and media, as well as theoretical and historical essays on the relationships between literature, science, and society.nnAs part of its exploration of science and the humanities in conjunction, the course addresses how understandings of nature are mediated through techniques of narrative, rhetoric, visualization, and demonstration. In the meantime, it also examines how the emergence of modern disciplinary "science" influenced the development of literary language, tropes, and techniques of subject development. This class will expose the ways that science has been mobilized for various ideological projects and to serve different interests, and will produce insights into contemporary debates about the sciences and humanities.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: ; Zur, D. (PI)

JAPAN 265: Readings in Premodern Japanese (JAPAN 165)

Edo and Meiji periods with focus on grammar and reading comprehension. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 246 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Stilerman, A. (PI)

JAPAN 279: Research in Japanese Linguistics

This proseminar introduces Japanese linguistics research to graduate students and advanced undergraduate students. Through readings and discussions, students will familiarize themselves with materials and references in both English and Japanese in preparation for conducting research effectively in their own areas of interest in Japanese linguistics. They learn the organization and presentation of research projects and conduct a pilot project in their selected area of interest. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 103 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: ; Matsumoto, Y. (PI)

JAPAN 288: The Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime (ARTHIST 287A, JAPAN 188)

The Japanese tea ceremony, the ultimate premodern multimedia phenomenon, integrates architecture, garden design, ceramics, painting, calligraphy, and other treasured objects into a choreographed ritual wherein host, objects, and guests perform designated roles on a tiny stage sometimes only six feet square.. In addition to its much-touted aesthetic and philosophical aspects, the practice of tea includes inevitable political and rhetorical dimensions. This course traces the evolution of tea practice from its inception within the milieu of courtier diversions, Zen monasteries, and warrior villas, through its various permutations into the 20th century, where it was manipulated by the emerging industrialist class for different-but ultimately similar-ends.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

JAPAN 292: Analyzing Japanese Text and Talk (JAPAN 192)

Are there reasons why certain words, phrases, sentences and prosody are chosen by language speakers and writers in specific contexts? What linguistic and extra-linguistic elements give the hearers and readers the impression that certain utterances and passages are friendly, accusatory, officious, humorous, personal, formal, colloquial, etc.? This seminar provides an introduction to different theoretical and analytical approaches to studying language use in context (e.g. pragmatics, sociolinguistics, usage-based grammar, conversational analysis, critical discourse analysis) and an opportunity to critically analyze text and talk. Using the analytical tools acquired through readings and discussions, students will be able to analyze Japanese materials of their selection. The course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with interests either (or both) in Japanese linguistics and literature.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4
Instructors: ; Matsumoto, Y. (PI)

JAPAN 299: Master's Thesis or Translation

A total of 5 units, taken in one or more quarters.nn (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

JAPAN 381: Topics in Pragmatics and Discourse Analysis

Naturally occurring discourse (conversational, narrative, or written) and theoretical implications. Discourse of different age groups, expressions of identity and persona, and individual styles. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4
Instructors: ; Matsumoto, Y. (PI)

JAPAN 389: Seminar in Premodern Japanese Literature

This graduate seminar examines the major texts, genres, and conceptual developments in the field of premodern Japanese literary studies. It combines three approaches: 1) Reading seminar covering texts in the original Japanese in annotated print editions. 2) Review of current scholarly works in English and Japanese. 3) Methodology and bibliography workshop on digital and analog tools available to the researcher. On a rotating basis we will focus on the Ancient and Classical periods, the Medieval period, and the Early Modern period.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 50 units total)
Instructors: ; Stilerman, A. (PI)

JAPAN 396: Seminar in Modern Japanese Literature

Works and topics vary each year. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: fourth-year Japanese or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Levy, I. (PI)

JAPAN 399: Dissertation Research

For doctoral students in Japanese working on dissertations.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-12

JAPAN 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit

JAPAN 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit
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