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APPPHYS 219: Solid State Physics Problems in Energy Technology

Technology issues for a secure energy future; role of solid state physics in energy technologies. Topics include the physics principles behind future technologies related to solar energy and solar cells, solid state lighting, superconductivity, solid state fuel cells and batteries, electrical energy storage, materials under extreme condition, nanomaterials.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 3

BIOE 355: Advanced Biochemical Engineering (CHEMENG 355)

Combines biological knowledge and methods with quantitative engineering principles. Quantitative review of biochemistry and metabolism; recombinant DNA technology and synthetic biology (metabolic engineering). The production of protein pharaceuticals as a paradigm for the application of chemical engineering principles to advanced process development within the framework of current business and regulatory requirements. Prerequisite: CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188) or BIOSCI 41, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CEE 176A: Energy Efficient Buildings

Quantitative evaluation of technologies and techniques for reducing energy demand of residential-scale buildings. Heating and cooling load calculations, financial analysis, passive-solar design techniques, water heating systems, photovoltaic system sizing for net-zero-energy all-electric homes. Offered for 3 or 4 units; the 4-unit option includes a lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: ; Masters, G. (PI)

CEE 176B: Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency

This course introduces analysis, sizing and performance estimations (electrical and financial) of renewable energy systems on both sides of the electric meter with an emphasis on photovoltaics and wind-power systems. Basic electric power generation, transmission and distribution, as well as distributed generation will be introduced. Optional Laboratory section for a 4th unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

CEE 207A: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5

CEE 226: Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems

Life cycle modeling of products, industrial processes, and infrastructure/building systems; material and energy balances for large interdependent systems; environmental accounting; and life cycle costing. These methods, based on ISO 14000 standards, are used to examine emerging technologies, such as biobased products, building materials, building integrated photovoltaics, and alternative design strategies, such as remanufacturing, dematerialization, LEED, and Design for Environment: DfE. Student teams complete a life cycle assessment of a product or system chosen from industry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 272R: Modern Power Systems Engineering

Focus is on Power Engineering from a systems point of view. Topics covered may include modeling of generation, transmission and distribution systems, load flow analysis, transient and steady-state stability analysis. Special emphasis given to modern market operations and dispatch, modeling intermittent controllable power sources, storage technologies, mechanisms for demand response, sensing the grid and the role of market mechanisms for deep integration. Course content may vary year to year.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CEE 274A: Environmental Microbiology I (CHEMENG 174, CHEMENG 274)

Basics of microbiology and biochemistry. The biochemical and biophysical principles of biochemical reactions, energetics, and mechanisms of energy conservation. Diversity of microbial catabolism, flow of organic matter in nature: the carbon cycle, and biogeochemical cycles. Bacterial physiology, phylogeny, and the ecology of microbes in soil and marine sediments, bacterial adhesion, and biofilm formation. Microbes in the degradation of pollutants. Prerequisites: CHEM 33, 35, and BIOSCI 41, CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188), or equivalents.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CEE 274B: Microbial Bioenergy Systems (CHEMENG 456)

Introduction to microbial metabolic pathways and to the pathway logic with a special focus on microbial bioenergy systems. The first part of the course emphasizes the metabolic and biochemical principles of pathways, whereas the second part is more specifically directed toward using this knowledge to understand existing systems and to design innovative microbial bioenergy systems for biofuel, biorefinery, and environmental applications. There also is an emphasis on the implications of rerouting of energy and reducing equivalents for the fitness and ecology of the organism. Prerequisites: CHEMENG 174 or 181 and organic chemistry, or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Spormann, A. (PI)

CEE 277L: Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 177L)

A city is comprised of people and a complex system of systems. Data provides the connective tissue between those systems. Smart cities use information technology (IT) to harness that data for operational efficiency, efficacy of government services, and sustainability. Key enablers covered include: IoT, open data, analytics, cloud and cognitive computing, and systems of engagement. System case studies will include: water, energy, transportation, buildings, food production, urban design, and social services. The evolving relationship between a city and its citizens as well as the risks / challenges of smart cities will also be explored.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Lechner, R. (PI); Ong, C. (SI)

CHEMENG 274: Environmental Microbiology I (CEE 274A, CHEMENG 174)

Basics of microbiology and biochemistry. The biochemical and biophysical principles of biochemical reactions, energetics, and mechanisms of energy conservation. Diversity of microbial catabolism, flow of organic matter in nature: the carbon cycle, and biogeochemical cycles. Bacterial physiology, phylogeny, and the ecology of microbes in soil and marine sediments, bacterial adhesion, and biofilm formation. Microbes in the degradation of pollutants. Prerequisites: CHEM 33, 35, and BIOSCI 41, CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188), or equivalents.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CHEMENG 355: Advanced Biochemical Engineering (BIOE 355)

Combines biological knowledge and methods with quantitative engineering principles. Quantitative review of biochemistry and metabolism; recombinant DNA technology and synthetic biology (metabolic engineering). The production of protein pharaceuticals as a paradigm for the application of chemical engineering principles to advanced process development within the framework of current business and regulatory requirements. Prerequisite: CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188) or BIOSCI 41, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CHEMENG 456: Microbial Bioenergy Systems (CEE 274B)

Introduction to microbial metabolic pathways and to the pathway logic with a special focus on microbial bioenergy systems. The first part of the course emphasizes the metabolic and biochemical principles of pathways, whereas the second part is more specifically directed toward using this knowledge to understand existing systems and to design innovative microbial bioenergy systems for biofuel, biorefinery, and environmental applications. There also is an emphasis on the implications of rerouting of energy and reducing equivalents for the fitness and ecology of the organism. Prerequisites: CHEMENG 174 or 181 and organic chemistry, or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Spormann, A. (PI)

ECON 155: Environmental Economics and Policy

Economic sources of environmental problems and alternative policies for dealing with them (technology standards, emissions taxes, and marketable pollution permits). Evaluation of policies addressing local air pollution, global climate change, and the use of renewable resources. Connections between population growth, economic output, environmental quality, sustainable development, and human welfare. Prerequisite: ECON 50. May be taken concurrently with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI

EE 293A: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution (ENERGY 293A, MATSCI 156)

Operating principles and applications of emerging technological solutions to the energy demands of the world. The scale of global energy usage and requirements for possible solutions. Basic physics and chemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, and batteries. Performance issues, including economics, from the ideal device to the installed system. The promise of materials research for providing next generation solutions. Undergraduates register in 156 for 4 units; graduates register in 256 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 145 and 152 or equivalent coursework in thermodynamics and electronic properties.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3-4

ENERGY 253: Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ENERGY 153)

CO2 separation from syngas and flue gas for gasification and combustion processes. Transportation of CO2 in pipelines and sequestration in deep underground geological formations. Pipeline specifications, monitoring, safety engineering, and costs for long distance transport of CO2. Comparison of options for geological sequestration in oil and gas reservoirs, deep unmineable coal beds, and saline aquifers. Life cycle analysis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

ENERGY 267: Engineering Valuation and Appraisal of Oil and Gas Wells, Facilities, and Properties (ENERGY 167)

Appraisal of development and remedial work on oil and gas wells; appraisal of producing properties; estimation of productive capacity, reserves; operating costs, depletion, and depreciation; value of future profits, taxation, fair market value; original or guided research problems on economic topics with report. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ENERGY 269: Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

Conceptual models of heat and mass flows within geothermal reservoirs. The fundamentals of fluid/heat flow in porous media; convective/conductive regimes, dispersion of solutes, reactions in porous media, stability of fluid interfaces, liquid and vapor flows. Interpretation of geochemical, geological, and well data to determine reservoir properties/characteristics. Geothermal plants and the integrated geothermal system.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 3

ENERGY 293A: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution (EE 293A, MATSCI 156)

Operating principles and applications of emerging technological solutions to the energy demands of the world. The scale of global energy usage and requirements for possible solutions. Basic physics and chemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, and batteries. Performance issues, including economics, from the ideal device to the installed system. The promise of materials research for providing next generation solutions. Undergraduates register in 156 for 4 units; graduates register in 256 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 145 and 152 or equivalent coursework in thermodynamics and electronic properties.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3-4

ENERGY 293C: Energy from Wind and Water Currents

This course focuses on the extraction of energy from wind, waves and tides.nThe emphasis in the course is technical leading to a solid understanding ofnestablished extraction systems and discussion of promising new technologies.nWe will also cover resource planning and production optimization through observations and computer simulations.nThe course includes at least one weekend field trip, and may include experimentsnin wind tunnel and/or flume.nnPrerequisites: CEE176B or EE293B, programming experience, understanding of fluid mechanics, electrical systems, and engineering optimization.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 3

MATSCI 256: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution

Operating principles and applications of emerging technological solutions to the energy demands of the world. The scale of global energy usage and requirements for possible solutions. Basic physics and chemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, and batteries. Performance issues, including economics, from the ideal device to the installed system. The promise of materials research for providing next generation solutions.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Clemens, B. (PI)

MATSCI 302: Solar Cells

This course takes a comprehensive view of solar cells and what will need to be done to enable them to substantially change how the world obtains its electricity. After covering the fundamentals (light trapping, current flow in pn junctions, recombination) that are important for almost all photovoltaic technologies, the course will address technologies based on highly crystalline forms of silicon and gallium arsenide. The device simulator PC1D will be used to model solar cells. The course will then go through multijunctions cells with concentrators, low-cost thin-film solar cells, organic semiconductors, hybrid perovskites and nanowires. There will be discussions of module design and the economics of the solar industry. There will be a tour of a company that makes solar cells and guest lectures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

MATSCI 303: Principles, Materials and Devices of Batteries

Thermodynamics and electrochemistry for batteries. Emphasis on lithium ion batteries, but also different types including lead acid, nickel metal hydride, metal air, sodium sulfur and redox flow. Battery electrode materials, electrolytes, separators, additives and electrode-electrolyte interface. Electrochemical techniques; advanced battery materials with nanotechnology; battery device structure. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Cui, Y. (PI); Li, Y. (TA)

MATSCI 316: Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology

This course covers important aspects of nanotechnology in nanomaterials synthesis and fabrication, novel property at the nanoscale, tools and applications: a variety of nanostructures including nanocrystal, nanowire, carbon nanotube, graphene, nanoporous material, block copolymer, and self-assembled monolayer; nanofabrication techniques developed over the past 20 years; thermodynamic, electronic and optical property; applications in solar cells, batteries, biosensors and electronics. Other nanotechnology topics may be explored through a group project. SCPD offering.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Cui, Y. (PI); Lin, D. (TA)

ME 260: Fuel Cell Science and Technology

Emphasis on proton exchange membrane (PEM) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), and principles of electrochemical energy conversion. Topics in materials science, thermodynamics, and fluid mechanics. Prerequisites: MATH 43, PHYSICS 55, and ENGR 30 or ME 140, or equivalents.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | Units: 3
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