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TAPS 11N: Dramatic Tensions: Theater and the Marketplace

Preference to freshmen. The current state of the American theater and its artists. Conventional wisdom says that theater is a dying art, and a lost cause, especially in an age of multi-media entertainment. But there are more young playwrights, actors, and directors entering the field today than at any other time in American history. Focus is on the work of today's theater artists, with an emphasis on an emerging generation of playwrights. Students read a cross-section of plays from writers currently working in the US and UK, covering a spectrum of subjects and styles from serious to comic, from the musical to the straight play. Hits and misses from recent seasons of the New York and London stages and some of the differences of artistic taste across the Atlantic. Hands-on exploration of the arts and skills necessary to make a play succeed. Students develop their own areas of interest, in guided projects in design, direction or performance. Conversations with playwrights, designers ,and directors. Labs and master classes to solve problems posed in areas of creative production. Class meets literary managers and producers who are on the frontlines of underwriting new talent. Class trips include two plays at major Bay Area Stages.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Freed, A. (PI)

TAPS 12N: To Die For: Antigone and Political Dissent (CLASSICS 17N)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 6N.) Preference to freshmen. Tensions inherent in the democracy of ancient Athens; how the character of Antigone emerges in later drama, film, and political thought as a figure of resistance against illegitimate authority; and her relevance to contemporary struggles for women's and workers' rights and national liberation. Readings and screenings include versions of Antigone by Sophocles, Anouilh, Brecht, Fugard/Kani/Ntshona, Paulin, Glowacki, Gurney, and von Trotta.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-ER
Instructors: ; Kimmel, A. (PI); Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 29: Theater Performance: Acting

Students cast in department productions receive credit for their participation as actors; 1-2 units for graduate directing workshop projects and 1-3 units for major productions (units determined by instructor). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 39: Theater Crew

Class for students working on TAPS department productions in the following role: backstage/run crew, scenic technician, or costume technician. Night and weekend time possible. Pre-approval from Jane Casamajor (janecasa@stanford.edu) is required for enrollment. Read the information below to determine enrollment section. TAPS has a variety of roles available. No experience is necessary; this is a class and we will train you to fill any assigned position. nnSection 01 - BACKSTAGE/RUN CREW: Autumn productions (As Soon as Impossible directed by Samer Al-Saber; Developmental Series Dedication of the Harry J. Elam Jr. Studio Theater led by Michael J. Rau in collaboration with IDA, CCBPA, CSRE and VPA) will need light board operators, sound board operators, camera operators, deck crew and at least AS SOON AS IMPOSSIBLE will also need wardrobe crew. nnSection 02 - SCENE SHOP: Students will be immersed in the utilization of tools and equipment to construct scenery and install theatrical audio/visual systems. nnSections 03 & 04 - COSTUME SHOP: Students will learn hands-on costuming techniques including hand sewing, machine sewing, safety standards, costume construction and costuming crafts. (Section 03 meets on Tues. Section 04 meets on Weds.)nnNote: Scenic- and costume-shop appropriate clothing and closed-toed shoes are required for this class. Securely fasten long hair/loose clothing/jewelry to protect catching it in machine parts/when using machines. Project specific clothing may be suggested occasionally for work with paints, dyes or when in storage spaces. Aprons, masks, gloves, goggles and other PPE will be provided and available.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Casamajor, J. (PI)

TAPS 101P: Theater and Performance Making (TAPS 371P)

A creative workshop offering a range of generative exercises and techniques in order to devise, compose and perform original works. Students will explore a variety of texts (plays, poems, short stories, paintings) and work with the body, object and site. nnStudents will be encouraged to think critically about various compositional themes and ideas including: the relationship between form and content, aesthetics, space, proximity, and audience. Students will work independently and collaboratively creating original performances.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Rau, M. (PI)

TAPS 103: Beginning Improvising

The improvisational theater techniques that teach spontaneity, cooperation, team building, and rapid problem solving, emphasizing common sense, attention to reality, and helping your partner. Based on TheatreSports by Keith Johnstone. Readings, papers, and attendance at performances of improvisational theater. Limited enrollment. Improv, Improvisation, creativity and creative expression. Limited enrollment. 20 students enrolled on first come, first served basis. Remaining available filled by students on the waitlist, with priority given to TAPS majors/minors and those who have been unable to take the class previously due to limited capacity. In order to claim your spot off the waitlist, please attend the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

TAPS 104: Intermediate Improvisation

This class is the continued study of improvisational theater with a focus on stage skills, short and long form performance formats, and offstage applications of collaborative creativity. It is open to any students who have taken TAPS 103 or have previous onstage improv experience AND consent of the instructor. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

TAPS 119M: Special Topics: Building the Digital Body: Decoding Live Video in Performance

TAPS 119M Special Topics courses feature the annual Mohr Visiting Artist. The Mohr Visiting Artist program brings acclaimed and emerging artists to campus for a one-term period to teach a credited course and provide a presentation, exhibition or performance for the Stanford community and the public. The 21-22 Mohr Visiting Artist is Mikeah Jennings.nn"Real Time Film" is a conceptual model conflating performance, television, and movies. It's a live movie that examines the use of the image in entertainment, how we experience the image versus its manufacture, the split between surface and interior, and the different layers of truth. (Caden Manson, Big Art Group)nnThis Special Topics course is a collaborative workshop, introducing the digital performance style known as Real Time Film. Students will learn fundamental techniques to build upon their performance knowledge while engaging with live-feed cameras, and projections, on stage in real time. This workshop will focus particular attention on the actor in performance, ensemble building, company engagement, and an investigation of the dramaturgy and production techniques of contemporary performance companies utilizing live camera feeds and video projection onstage. Students will explore the works of contemporary companies like The Builders Association, The Wooster Group, Big Art Group, Jay Scheib, as well as international companies like The Gob Squad (UK), Katie Mitchell (UK) and others. The workshop interweaves principles of stage acting, on camera performance, and generative work to help the actor develop the skills that are being used more and more in virtual and mediated performances. Workshop sessions will be supplemented by readings, screenings and professional examples.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: ; Jennings, M. (PI)

TAPS 120A: Acting I: Fundamentals of Acting

A substantive introduction to the basics of the craft of acting, this course gives all incoming students the foundation of a common vocabulary. Students will learn fundamental elements of dramatic analysis, and how to apply it in action. Topics include scene analysis, environment work, psychological and physical scoring, and development of a sound and serviceable rehearsal technique. Scene work will be chosen from accessible, contemporary, and realistic plays. Outside rehearsal time required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Freed, A. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI)

TAPS 121V: Voice for the Actor

This course will focus on releasing a voice that effectively reaches the listener and is responsive to the actor's thoughts and feelings. Through work on breath awareness, alignment, resonance, and muscularity, students will learn to identify habits that help or hinder performance. Students will practice exercises to develop vocal strength, clarity, ease, and expressiveness while exploring the vocal demands of various texts and performing environments. Course will culminate in a presentation of classical and contemporary monologues. This course is a good preparation for auditions, rehearsal, and performance, and is appropriate for all levels. Priority space reserved for TAPS majors and minors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Hunt, S. (PI)

TAPS 122P: Undergrad Performance Project

The Undergraduate Performance Project provides students the opportunity to study and perform in major dramatic works. Students learn to form an artistic ensemble, develop dramaturgical materials, learn professional arts protocols and practice, devise within the ensemble, and develop live performance ability. Audition required. Preference to majors/minors. Evening rehearsals are required. Full schedule will be released during casting. Maybe repeated for credit. 3 maximum completions allowed. If repeated, 15 total units allowed.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-9 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

TAPS 124D: Acting for Non-Majors

This is a non-major studio class designed to introduce fundamental acting techniques and to provide performers with foundational exercises upon which to build an ever more sophisticated sense for the handling of the stage with the use of the Viewpoints Training system. The Viewpoints Training philosophy is designed to develop the actor's most valuable'and perhaps most elusive tools: The Body as our essential instrument, relaxation, spontaneity, and the ensemble. The course will approach the development of performance skills, relaxation techniques, theater games, ensemble building, and beginning improvisational exercises, while fostering a dramatic sense of play and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce
Instructors: ; Jennings, M. (PI)

TAPS 127: Movement for the Actor

This course is an exploration of movement techniques for the actor, designed to provide a foundation for performance practice. Students will develop a more grounded sense of ease and breath onstage, learn fundamentals of physical partnership, and acquire an expanded physical vocabulary. Areas of study include Laban movement analysis, observation and embodiment, basic contact improvisation, and physical characterization. Students will also engage a personalized warmup process for rehearsal and performance. All coursework will be entirely experiential, practical, and participatory. No previous experience necessary. Some outside rehearsal/investigation time required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Chapman, M. (PI)

TAPS 132S: Shopping, Styling, and the Culture of Costume

This course will examine the practical world of costume and clothing. We will discuss the practice and techniques of shopping for TV, film and theatre, and how to use shopping as a tool for design. We will also explore the ways culture influences how we see clothes in relation to character. Practical projects will include script analysis, visual research, shopping, and exploring closets and costume stocks. We will talk to professional shoppers and stylists to understand better what it is like to work in these fields. The final project will allow students to show their ingenuity and explore design in this very practical, but very creative way!
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Bodurtha, R. (PI)

TAPS 134: Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a production in the Department of Theater and Performance Studies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-8 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 140: Introduction to Projects in Theatrical Production

A seminar course for students performing significant production work on Theater and Performance Studies Department or other Stanford University student theater projects. Students serving as producers, directors, designers or stage managers, who wish mentorship and credit for their production work sign up for this course and contact the instructor, Laxmi Kumaran. nPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 153H: History of Directing (TAPS 253H)

In this class, students will examine the work of directors who shaped modern theater. Some of directors we are going to explore are Konstantin Stanislavski, Jerzy Grotowski, and director-choreographer Pina Bausch. In order to engage closely with directorial styles of these and other landmark directors, we will focus on their career-defining productions. The class will include readings, screenings of recorded performances whenever possible, and workshops with professionals in the field. Capped enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

TAPS 180Q: Noam Chomsky: The Drama of Resistance

Preference to sophomores. Chomsky's ideas and work which challenge the political and economic paradigms governing the U.S. Topics include his model for linguistics; cold war U.S. involvements in S.E. Asia, the Middle East, Central and S. America, the Caribbean, and Indonesia and E. Timor; the media, terrorism, ideology, and culture; student and popular movements; and the role of resistance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 190: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Freed, A. (PI)

TAPS 192: Nitery Board Practicum

Credit given for undergraduate student board members of the Experimental Nitery Studio.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: ; Casamajor, J. (PI)

TAPS 196: Dancing Black: Embodying the African Diaspora in the United States and the Caribbean (AFRICAAM 196, DANCE 196, TAPS 396)

What does it mean to dance black? How can studying comparative dance practices across the United States and the Caribbean expose continuities and differences in African diaspora experience? How can we draw strategies from black performance to inform our current movements for social change? This class will explore how dance and writing about performance have shaped notions of what it means to identify or be marked as an African diaspora subject. From the ring shouts of captive Africans to the 20th-century concert dance stage, from New York queer ballroom culture to Tiktok fads, this class will expose students to both historical and ethnographic methods for using dance to study the formation of black community in the New World. Looking beyond the surface of skin, we¿ll explore how race is experienced in muscle and flesh, and how black performers have historically taken advantage of or disavowed racialized ideas of how they can/should move. We will read theories of diaspora, queer of color critique and black feminist theory, and performance theory. We will search for the common questions and conversations about embodiment, the spectator¿s gaze, and black belonging that run through all three disciplines. Students will be required to do some movement research (through accessible, at-home dance practice), write weekly journals, and complete short essay projects. Students develop will skills for writing, speaking, and making performance to explore the intersections between race, sexuality, and dance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Reid, A. (PI)

TAPS 200: Senior Project

All TAPS Majors must complete a Senior Project that represents significant work in any area of theater and/or performance. The project must be an original contribution and can consist of any of the following: devising a performance, choreographing a dance, stage managing a production, designing a large theater work, performing a major role, writing a play, directing a show, or researching and writing a senior essay. Work for this project normally begins in Spring Quarter of the junior year and must be completed by the end of the senior year. Students receive credit for senior projects through TAPS 200. A minimum of 4 units is required, but additional units are available for larger projects. Students pursuing senior projects must submit a two-page proposal to a faculty advisor of their choice, which must be approved by the Undergraduate Advisor and the department faculty no later than the end of Spring Quarter of the junior year.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

TAPS 202: Honors Thesis

An advanced written project to fulfill the requirements for the Honors degree in TAPS. There are two ways to undertake an honors thesis. The first is to write a 40-50 page essay, which presents research on an important issue or subject of the student¿s choice. The second option is a 30-page essay that takes the student¿s capstone project as a case study and critically analyzes the creative work. Students are expected to work consistently throughout the year with their advisor, whom they identify at the time of application. Advisors can be selected from Academic Council faculty or artists-in-residence. Students should enroll in TAPS 202 each quarter during the senior year (1 unit in Autumn; 1 unit in Winter; 2 units in Spring).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Rau, M. (PI)

TAPS 231: Advanced Stage Lighting Design

Individually structured class in lighting mechanics and design through experimentation, discussions, and written reports. Prerequisite: 131 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable 55 times

TAPS 232: Advanced Costume Design

Individually structured tutorial for costume designers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 132 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

TAPS 233: Advanced Scene Design

Individually structured workshop. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 133 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit

TAPS 234: Advanced Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a Department of Theater and Performance Studies production. May be repeat for credit. Prerequisite: 134.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 235: Advanced Dramaturgy Project

Independent Study for Graduate Students completing dramaturgy projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5

TAPS 253H: History of Directing (TAPS 153H)

In this class, students will examine the work of directors who shaped modern theater. Some of directors we are going to explore are Konstantin Stanislavski, Jerzy Grotowski, and director-choreographer Pina Bausch. In order to engage closely with directorial styles of these and other landmark directors, we will focus on their career-defining productions. The class will include readings, screenings of recorded performances whenever possible, and workshops with professionals in the field. Capped enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

TAPS 290: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit

TAPS 301: World Theater History

This seminar offers a global survey of theater and performance from antiquity to 1945. Students will read plays and historical texts to broaden and enrich their knowledge of theater history and research. The course takes place during the Fall and Winter quarters, with students attending class every other week. This extended course structure is designed to allow more time for students to work through the course material. The final two sessions in each quarter will be reserved for students to present material of their own interest.nnPlease note: TAPS 301 is a required course for TAPS first-year PhD students. It is designed to prepare them for the comprehensive exam, which takes place at the end of the Winter quarter. Other students are welcome to take the course as a regular theater history seminar. Regardless, students should treat the course as one integrated sequence and enroll in both quarters (not just one or the other). nnnThe course will be graded Pass/Fail for first-year TAPS PhD students taking the exam; any other students may take the course as Pass/Fail or for a letter grade at the discretion of the instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: ; Looser, D. (PI)

TAPS 311: Performance and Historiography

This graduate seminar focuses on questions of historiography and the archive as they relate to studies of theater, dance, and performance. It blends rigorous discussion and theoretical exploration with practical experience in libraries, museums, and other local archival repositories. Throughout the course, we will explore representation, memory, repertoire, and narrative through examples in theatre and performance history. We will examine how events have been historicized, how absence has been represented, and how individuals are remembered and refigured. Important principles and practices of documentation will also be addressed throughout our discussions and activities. Our discussions and field trips will examine the status of data and various forms of evidence in constructing critical performance history (including prompt scripts, set designs, costumes, publicity material and other ephemera, actorly life-writing, video and digital documents, artifacts, visual material, and embodied traces). TAPS 311 also functions as a gateway course for TAPS PhD students in your first quarter of study at Stanford, familiarizing you with resources at the university and in the broader Bay Area. Note: This class will begin at 9:30am on Wednesdays.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Looser, D. (PI)

TAPS 321: Proseminar

Prepares PhD students for the academic profession by honing skills in presenting and publishing research, navigating the job market, and managing a career.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Phelan, P. (PI)

TAPS 341: Ars Theoretica: On Scholar-Artists

Interdisciplinarity is one of the hallmarks of performance studies, and integration of scholarly research and creative practice is at the core of our educational mission in TAPS. In this seminar, we will investigate the promise of mutual enrichment between these two areas. In exploring the work of scholar-artists who are working in theater and performance, we will ask what are some of the principles, methods, and procedures artists are using in their studios that can be productively employed in scholarly work, and vice versa: how scholarly research can support and engage the process of artistic creation. Interdisciplinarity thrives on collaboration, so accordingly, we will make efforts to explore the modes of collaborative scholarly work. In doing that we will try to perform, rather than just study and observe, the intersection between theory and practice in our discipline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Jakovljevic, B. (PI)

TAPS 371P: Theater and Performance Making (TAPS 101P)

A creative workshop offering a range of generative exercises and techniques in order to devise, compose and perform original works. Students will explore a variety of texts (plays, poems, short stories, paintings) and work with the body, object and site. nnStudents will be encouraged to think critically about various compositional themes and ideas including: the relationship between form and content, aesthetics, space, proximity, and audience. Students will work independently and collaboratively creating original performances.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Rau, M. (PI)

TAPS 379: Dramatic Literature in English: A Survey, 1900-2015 (ENGLISH 397)

Beginning with the first production of Ibsen's "A Doll House" and ending with Miranda's "Hamilton," this course focuses on innovative dramatic literature that transformed the genre.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: ; Phelan, P. (PI)

TAPS 390: Directed Reading

Students may take directing reading only with the permission of their dissertation advisor. Might be repeatable for credit twice for 6 units total.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 12 units total)

TAPS 396: Dancing Black: Embodying the African Diaspora in the United States and the Caribbean (AFRICAAM 196, DANCE 196, TAPS 196)

What does it mean to dance black? How can studying comparative dance practices across the United States and the Caribbean expose continuities and differences in African diaspora experience? How can we draw strategies from black performance to inform our current movements for social change? This class will explore how dance and writing about performance have shaped notions of what it means to identify or be marked as an African diaspora subject. From the ring shouts of captive Africans to the 20th-century concert dance stage, from New York queer ballroom culture to Tiktok fads, this class will expose students to both historical and ethnographic methods for using dance to study the formation of black community in the New World. Looking beyond the surface of skin, we¿ll explore how race is experienced in muscle and flesh, and how black performers have historically taken advantage of or disavowed racialized ideas of how they can/should move. We will read theories of diaspora, queer of color critique and black feminist theory, and performance theory. We will search for the common questions and conversations about embodiment, the spectator¿s gaze, and black belonging that run through all three disciplines. Students will be required to do some movement research (through accessible, at-home dance practice), write weekly journals, and complete short essay projects. Students develop will skills for writing, speaking, and making performance to explore the intersections between race, sexuality, and dance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Reid, A. (PI)

TAPS 802: TGR Dissertation

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit
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