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INTLPOL 268: Hack Lab

(Formerly IPS 268) This course aims to give students a solid understanding of the most common types of attacks used in cybercrime and cyberwarfare. Taught by a long-time cybersecurity practitioner, a recovering cyberlaw litigator, and a group of hearty, motivated TAs, each session will begin with a lecture covering the basics of an area of technology and how that technology has been misused in the past. Students will then complete a lab section, with the guidance of the instructor and assistants, where they attack a known insecure system using techniques and tools seen in the field. Each week, there will be a second lecture on the legal and policy impacts of the technologies and techniques we cover. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a basic understanding of some of the most common offensive techniques in use today as well as a comprehensive overview of the most important aspects of cyberpolicy and law. No computer science background is required. All students must have access to a Windows, Mac OS X or Linux laptop.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 4049: Hack Lab

This course aims to give students a solid understanding of the most common types of attacks used in cybercrime and cyberwarfare. Taught by a long-time cybersecurity practitioner, a recovering cyberlaw litigator, and a group of hearty, motivated TAs, each session will begin with a lecture covering the basics of an area of technology and how that technology has been misused in the past. Students will then complete a lab section, with the guidance of the instructor and assistants, where they attack a known insecure system using techniques and tools seen in the field. Each week, there will be a second lecture on the legal and policy impacts of the technologies and techniques we cover. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a basic understanding of some of the most common offensive techniques in use today as well as a comprehensive overview of the most important aspects of cyberpolicy and law. No computer science background is required. All students must have access to a Windows, Mac OS X or Linux laptop. Students must enroll in the lecture as well as one Computer Lab (Lab meets 50 minutes once a week). Special Instructions: This class is limited to 120 students with 30 spots for SLS students. If more than 30 SLS students wish to enroll, instructor permission is required. Elements used in grading: Class participation, written assignments, take-home midterm, and a final exam. Cross-listed with International Policy (INTLPOL 268). Law students see INTLPOL listing for Computer Lab section meeting times.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 3
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