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AFRICAST 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, EPI 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-4

AFRICAST 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, EPI 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-4

ANES 207: Medical Acupuncture

Acupuncture is part of a comprehensive system of traditional Chinese Medicine developed over the past two millennia. This course reviews the history and theoretical basis of acupuncture for the treatment of various diseases as well as for the alleviation of pain. Issues related to the incorporation of acupuncture into the current health care system and the efficacy of acupuncture in treating various diseases are addressed. Includes practical, hands-on sections.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Golianu, B. (PI)

ANTHRO 148: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 248, CHINA 155A, CHINA 255A)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 176: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 276)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 6 units total)

ANTHRO 182N: Smoke and Mirrors in Global Health

A few years ago, health experts began calling out tobacco as engendering a global health crisis, categorizing the cigarette as the world's greatest weapon of mass destruction. A "global health crisis"? What merits that title if not tobacco use? A hundred million people were killed by tobacco in the 20th century, and ten times that number ¿ a billion people ¿ are predicted to die prematurely from exposure to cigarette smoke over the next hundred years. How has tobaccocome to be labeled a global health crisis over the last decade and what has been the political response? From whence does activism and ongoing complacency regarding tobacco arise? How are they created in different cultural contexts?This course aims to provide students conceptual tools to tackle two specific thought projects: (1) to understand how institutional actors compete to define a situation in the world today as a problem of global health, and (2) to understand the sociocultural means by which something highly dangerous to health such as the cigarette is made both politically contentious and inert. On both fronts, special attention will be given to the ways global health activism and complacency unfold in the U.S. and China.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ANTHRO 248: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 148, CHINA 155A, CHINA 255A)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 4-5

ANTHRO 276: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 176)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 6 units total)

BIOE 70Q: Medical Device Innovation

BIOE 70Q invites students to apply design thinking to the creation of healthcare technologies. Students will learn about the variety of factors that shape healthcare innovation, and through hands-on design projects, invent their own solutions to clinical needs. Guest instructors will include engineers, doctors, entrepreneurs, and others who have helped bring ideas from concept to clinical use.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

BIOE 371: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (MED 271)

This course (BIOE371, MED271) exposes students to the challenges and opportunities of developing and implementing innovative health technologies to help patients around the world. Non-communicable diseases, such as metabolic and chronic respiratory disease, now account for 7 in 10 deaths worldwide, creating the need for innovative health technologies that work across diverse global markets. At the beginning of the quarter, the course will provide an overview of the dynamic global health technology industry. Next, faculty members, guest experts, and students will discuss key differences and similarities when commercializing new products in the for-profit health technology sector across six important regions: the US and Europe, China and Japan, and India and Brazil. Finally, the course will explore critical 'global health' issues that transcend international borders and how technology can be leveraged to address them. This section will culminate with an interactive debate focused on whether for-profit, nonprofit, or hybrid models are best for implementing sustainable global health solutions. The last class will be devoted to synthesis, reflection, and a discussion of career opportunities in the global health technology field.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 1

BIOE 374A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (ME 368A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are required to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

CEE 265D: Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries

Economic, social, political, and technical aspects of sustainable water supply and sanitation service provision in developing countries. Service pricing, alternative institutional structures including privatization, and the role of consumer demand and community participation in the planning process. Environmental and public health considerations, and strategies for serving low-income households. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, see jennadavis.stanford.edu for application.
Last offered: Winter 2022 | Units: 1-3

CEE 374W: Advanced Topics in Water, Health and Development

Advanced topics in water, health and development. Emphasis on low-and-middle-income countries. Class content varies according to interests of students. Instructor consent required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable 25 times (up to 50 units total)
Instructors: ; Davis, J. (PI)

COMPMED 84Q: Globally Emerging Zoonotic Diseases

Preference to sophomores. Infectious diseases impacting veterinary and human health around the world today. Mechanisms of disease, epidemiology, and underlying diagnostic, treatment and control principles associated with these pathogens. ***This course will be offered in AY 23-24.***
Last offered: Spring 2022 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

EASTASN 117: Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia (EASTASN 217)

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, COVID-19)..., social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Last offered: Winter 2022 | Units: 3-5

EASTASN 217: Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia (EASTASN 117)

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, COVID-19)..., social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Last offered: Winter 2022 | Units: 3-5

ECON 118: Development Economics

The microeconomic problems and policy concerns of less developed countries. Topics include: health and education; risk and insurance; microfinance; agriculture; technology; governance. Emphasis is on economic models and empirical evidence. Prerequisites: ECON 50, ECON 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Morten, M. (PI)

ECON 127: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (HRP 227, MED 262)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in lower-income countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ECON 215: Development Economics II

This is a course focusing on macro development research. It will cover dynamic models of growth and development, with a focus on migration; technological change; the functioning of financial markets; barriers to agricultural productivity; informal financial systems (savings, credit, and insurance); and public finance in less developed countries. Prerequisites: 202 or 202N, 270.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Morten, M. (PI)

EE 46: Engineering For Good: Contributing to Saving the World and Having Fun Doing It

Projects that provide immediate and positive impact on the world. Focus is on global health and sustainable development by learning from experts in these fields. Students work on real-world projects with help from members of NGOs and social entrepreneurial companies as part of the hand-on learning experience. Prerequisite: ENGR 21 or ENGR 40M or EE 122A or CS 106B or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3

FEMGEN 206: Global Medical Issues Affecting Women (SOMGEN 206)

This course probes the principal issues affecting women and girls medically around the world. Through interactive discussions, guest lectures, case studies, and academic readings, students become acquainted with the most critical challenges to women's health globally, and use selected analytical tools to assess how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. Topics include women's cancer, birth control, infertility, female genital mutilation, midwifery, obstetric fistula, breastfeeding, violence against women, and women's representation in biomedical research. The aim is to cultivate in students a nuanced appreciation of women's unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape. S/NC or +/-.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Sarnquist, C. (PI)

HISTORY 243G: Tobacco and Health in World History: How Big Nic created the template for global science denial (HISTORY 343G)

Cigarettes are the world's leading cause of death--but how did we come into this world, where 6 trillion cigarettes are smoked every year? Here we explore the political, cultural, and technological origins of the cigarette and cigarette epidemic, using the tobacco industry's 80 million pages of secret documents. Topics include the history of cigarette advertising and cigarette design, the role of the tobacco industry in fomenting climate change denial, and questions raised by the testimony of experts in court.
Last offered: Autumn 2021 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 343G: Tobacco and Health in World History: How Big Nic created the template for global science denial (HISTORY 243G)

Cigarettes are the world's leading cause of death--but how did we come into this world, where 6 trillion cigarettes are smoked every year? Here we explore the political, cultural, and technological origins of the cigarette and cigarette epidemic, using the tobacco industry's 80 million pages of secret documents. Topics include the history of cigarette advertising and cigarette design, the role of the tobacco industry in fomenting climate change denial, and questions raised by the testimony of experts in court.
Last offered: Autumn 2021 | Units: 4-5

HRP 207: Introduction to Concepts and Methods in Health Services and Policy Research I

Primarily for medical students in the Health Services and Policy Research scholarly concentration. Topics include health economics, statistics, decision analysis, study design, quality measurement, cost benefit and effectiveness analysis, and evidence based guidelines.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Haberland, C. (PI)

HRP 208: Introduction to Concepts and Methods in Health Services and Policy Research II

Primarily for medical students in the Health Services and Policy Research scholarly concentration. Focus will be on developing research ideas and writing proposals for HSPR research projects. In class presentations will occur at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Haberland, C. (PI)

HUMBIO 26: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, EPI 235, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-4

HUMBIO 114: Global Change and Emerging Infectious Disease (EARTHSYS 114, EARTHSYS 214, ESS 213)

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 121E: Ethnicity and Medicine (EMED 121E)

Weekly lecture series. Examines the linguistic, social class, and cultural factors that impact patient care. Presentations promote culturally sensitive health care services and review contemporary research issues involving minority and underserved populations. Topics include health care inequities and medical practices of African Americans, Asians, Latinos, Native Americans, immigrants, and refugees in both urban and rural settings. 1 unit requires weekly lecture attendance, completion of required readings, completion of response questions; 2 units requires weekly lecture attendance and discussion session, completion of required readings and weekly response questions; 3 units (HUMBIO only) requires completion of a significant term paper. Students must in enroll in HUMBIO 121E for 3 units to receive a letter grade. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit. In 2020-21, a 'Letter' or 'CR' grade will satisfy the Ways requirement. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP

HUMBIO 122M: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (PEDS 212)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. Med/Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Rodriguez, E. (PI)

HUMBIO 124C: Global Child Health (MED 124, PEDS 124)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 124C. Med/Graduate students must enroll in MED 124 or PEDS 124.) This course introduces students to key challenges to the health and well being of children worldwide. We explicitly focus on child and public health problems in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to reflect the global burden of disease among children. We will review the scope and magnitude of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, as well as examine regional variations. We will then identify both medical and non-medical causes, effects of, as well as interventions to address, some of the biggest child health problems. The course will also prevent an overview of the role of culture, gender, and non-state actors (NGOs, foundations, etc.) on health and health policy. Optional: The course will be taught in conjunction with an optional two-unit community engaged learning component. Please view the course syllabus for more information. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or equivalent or Biology Foundations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Last offered: Spring 2022 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

MED 226: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (EPI 237, INTLPOL 290)

(Formerly IPS 290 and HRP 237) How do you come up with an idea for a useful research project in a low resource setting? How do you develop a research question, prepare a concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, complex cultural situations, and unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aimed at graduate students interested in global health research, though students of all disciplines interested in practical methods for research are welcome. Undergraduates who have completed 85 units or more may enroll with instructor consent. Sign up for 1 unit credit to participate in class sessions or 3 units to both participate in classes and develop a concept note.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

MED 232: Global Health: Scaling Health Technology Innovations in Low Resource Settings

Recent advances in health technologies - incorporating innovations like robotics, cloud computing, artificial intelligence, and smart sensors - have raised expectations of a dramatic impact on health outcomes across the world. However, bringing innovative technologies to low resource settings has proven challenging, limiting their impact. Ironically, the current COVID-19 pandemic has become Exhibit 1 in the challenges the global health community faces in scaling innovative interventions. This course explores critical questions regarding the implementation and impact of technological innovations in low-resource settings. The course will feature thought leaders from the health technology community, who will explore examples of technologies that have been successful in low resource communities, as well as those that have failed. A subset of these examples will be drawn from the current pandemic. Students will think critically to consider conditions under which technologies reach scale and have positive impact in the global health field. Students will also have an opportunity to work on real-world projects, each of which will focus on the potential opportunity for a health technology in a low-resource setting and consider approaches to ensure its impact at scale. This course will be taught by Dr. Anurag Mairal, Adjunct Professor of Medicine and the Director, Global Outreach Programs at Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign, and Dr. Michele Barry, Senior Associate Dean for Global Health and Director of the Center for Innovation in Global Health. This course is open to undergraduate students, graduate students, and medical students. Students can take the course for two or three units. Students enrolling in the course for a third unit will work on the group project described above. Students enrolled in the class for three units will also have additional assignments, including weekly discussion posts. Students must submit an application and be selected to receive an enrollment code. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center The application form can be found at the following link: https://forms.gle/K3nyjEcWuJLYTPo18. Questions can be directed to Course Manager, Yosefa Gilon, ygilon@stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

MED 233: Global Health: Beyond Diseases and International Organizations

Provides multidisciplinary trainees insight into over-arching themes of global health. Topics include systemic issues affecting healthcare progress globally, ethical and thoughtful approaches to solving these issues, as well as economics, water sanitation, public health, organizations in global health, human rights, involvement in NGOs, ethics of overseas work, and other non-medical aspects of this subject. This course will cover some of the essentials of patient care while working in the field as well including child health care, malaria, TB, and HIV. The course is only open to graduate students and MD/MSPA/PhD students and faculty (of any discipline). Students must submit an application and be selected to receive an enrollment code. The application form can be found at the following link: https://forms.gle/dYfkzmWFUiEgfz9D6
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, EPI 235, HUMBIO 26)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-4

MED 242: Human Rights and Health

Weekly lectures on how human rights violations affect health. Topics include: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva.
Last offered: Winter 2022 | Units: 1

MED 262: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (ECON 127, HRP 227)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in lower-income countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | Units: 5

OIT 333: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (¿Extreme¿) is for students who have a passion for social impact, and want to experience designing products and services that address issues of global poverty, through tackling real world challenges in collaboration with low-resource communities. Extreme is a two-quarter graduate level sequence cross listed by the Graduate School of Business (OIT333/334) and the School of Engineering (ME206A/B). The program is hosted by the d.school and open to students from all Stanford schools. This multidisciplinary team, fast paced, project based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners, and the communities they serve, on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modeling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Products and services designed in the class have impacted well over 100 million people worldwide. Participants have the opportunity to continue to work on their projects post-class with financial, mentoring and resource support through our summer Social E Lab incubator, and fall Extreme Design Lab accelerator. LIMITED ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION. MUST SIGN UP FOR BOTH OIT333 (WINTER) AND OIT334 (SPRING). SEE EXTREME.STANFORD.EDU FOR MORE DETAILS AND APPLICATION PROCESS WHICH OPENS IN OCTOBER. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Win | Units: 4

OSPGEN 259: Community Health in Oaxaca

Close observation of clinicians at work in community health settings in Oaxaca and service with local community health organizations. Combination of classroom study and discussion with cultural immersion, language training, clinical shadowing, and community service. Topics include: Mexican healthcare system; cultural, socioeconomic and educational factors impacting health of Mexicans and Mexican immigrants to U.S.; Mexican cultural and health beliefs; Mexican migration as a multi-ethnic process.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 6 units total)

PEDS 212: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (HUMBIO 122M)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. Med/Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Rodriguez, E. (PI)

PEDS 223: Human Rights and Global Health

Open to medical students, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates. Examines the newly emerging field of human rights and global health, beginning with the essential background into the field of human rights, and the recent emergence of health as a human right. Emphasis is on the pioneering work of Dr. Paul Farmer and Partners in Health and the challenge he and his organization have posed to the conventional wisdom about approaches to combating poor health and disease worldwide. Topics include the "big three" infectious diseases -- tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS -- as well as emerging infectious diseases, clean water and sanitation, and malnutrition and famine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

PSYC 51Q: Culture, Psychology, and Mental Health Treatment

Focuses on a critical analysis of Western approach to psychology and psychiatric terms of understanding mental illness, psychiatric phenomena, and treatment of mental health disorders. Includes an orientation to and critique of western clinical psychology/psychiatry and an inquity as to its relevance outside Western settings. Includes guest speakers representing cross-cultural providers of mental health services as well as medical anthropologists and critics of the Western generalizations in psychiatry. Special attention place on cross-cultural psychiatry and international mental health efforts.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | Units: 2

SOMGEN 206: Global Medical Issues Affecting Women (FEMGEN 206)

This course probes the principal issues affecting women and girls medically around the world. Through interactive discussions, guest lectures, case studies, and academic readings, students become acquainted with the most critical challenges to women's health globally, and use selected analytical tools to assess how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. Topics include women's cancer, birth control, infertility, female genital mutilation, midwifery, obstetric fistula, breastfeeding, violence against women, and women's representation in biomedical research. The aim is to cultivate in students a nuanced appreciation of women's unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape. S/NC or +/-.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Sarnquist, C. (PI)

STRAMGT 545: Taking Social Innovation to Scale

How do you get the best new social innovations to reach the hundreds of millions of people who need it the most? And how do ensure that they are developed, deployed and scaled in a way that is relevant, appropriate and sustainable? Innovators tackling the world's most difficult problems often ignore, misunderstand, and under-invest in the critical business challenges involved in crossing "the middle of the value chain." This is innovation's valley of death: product and system adaption and evaluation; evidence generation and design validation; business and partnership planning; formal or informal regulatory approval and registration. How do you design, introduce, and optimize the intervention's uptake before it can be taken to scale by markets, governments or other systems? The class is taught be Steve Davis, President & CEO of PATH (www.path.org), a leader in global health innovation, and former global Director of Social Innovation at McKinsey & Company. We take an inter-disciplinary approach to look at the factors that pull innovation forward, push it from behind, and (often to the world's detriment) block its successful implementation and scaling. First grounding the discussion in research on innovation and social change, we then apply business principles, real world experiences and several important case studies in global health to examine the way good ideas get stuck, and how good ideas can turn into innovation that matters. We focus on root causes for failure, success factors, and business practices and tools to enable millions of lives to be impacted by social innovation. The seminar combines lectures, case studies, visiting practitioners and team projects focused on the business case for scaling specific social innovations. The goal is to help the next generation of social innovation leaders think more about some of the mistakes of the past, lessons for the future, and new ways of approaching old problems, all from a practitioner's point of view.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 2
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