2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 25 results for: PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems.nnAn alternative version of the course, PSYCH 1L, is also offered for reduced (3) units, but does not count for major/minor requirements for Psychology or other disciplines. For more information on PSYCH 1 and PSYCH 1L, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 1L: Introduction to Psychology

A reduced-unit version of Stanford¿s popular Psych 1 class. An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems. nThe primary version of the course, PSYCH 1, is offered for 5 units and counts for major/minor requirements for Psychology and other disciplines. For more information on PSYCH 1 and PSYCH 1L, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 10: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (STATS 60, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 21N: How to Make a Racist (AFRICAAM 121N, CSRE 21N)

How do children, with no innate beliefs or expectations about race, grow up to be racist? To address this complex question, this seminar will introduce students to the cognitive, social, and cultural factors that contribute to the development of racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. We will begin by defining key concepts (e.g., ¿What is race and what is racism?¿), and will then take a developmental approach to examine racist thought from early childhood until adulthood. The seminar will include lectures that will provide an introduction to each topic. These lectures will be supplemented by readings and discussion. Students will engage thoughtfully and critically with the topics and readings by sharing experiences, perspectives, confusions, and insights through discussion and in writing. Students with diverse experiences and perspectives will be welcomed and encouraged to participate.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Roberts, S. (PI)

PSYCH 30: Introduction to Perception

Behavioral and neural aspects of perception focusing on visual and auditory perception. Topics include: scientific methods for studying perception, anatomy and physiology of the visual and auditiory systems, color vision, depth perception, motion perception, stereopsis, visual recognition, pitch and loudness perception, speech perception, and reorganization of the visual system in the blind.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 45: Introduction to Learning and Memory

The literature on learning and memory including cognitive and neural organization of memory, mechanisms of remembering and forgetting, and why people sometimes falsely remember events that never happened. Cognitive theory and behavioral evidence integrated with data from patient studies and functional brain imaging. Required prerequisite: PSYCH 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 50: Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

Survey of topics relating brain activity to cognitive processes and behavior. The course begins with an overview of neurophysiology and techniques to measure brain activity. We then discuss perceptual and motor processes before investigating neural responses related to attention, memory, and cognitive control. The course concludes with a discussion of brain processes related to reward, decision making, and social cognition.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 60: Introduction to Developmental Psychology

Psychological development from birth to adulthood, emphasizing infancy and the early and middle childhood years. The nature of change during childhood and theories of development. Recommended: PSYCH 1.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 60A: Introduction to Developmental Psychology Section

Guided observation of children age 2-5 at Bing Nursery School. Corequisite: 60.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 70: Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology (SOC 2)

Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives.nnnThis course is offered for 3-4 units. The 4 unit option has weekly discussion sections while the 3 unit version does not.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints