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1 - 5 of 5 results for: OIT 384: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation

BIOE 374A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (ME 368A, MED 272A)

This is the first quarter of a two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/ OIT 385). In this course, students learn how to develop comprehensive solutions (most commonly medical devices) to some of the most significant medical problems. The first quarter includes an introduction to needs finding methods, brainstorming and concept creation. Students learn strategies for understanding and interpreting clinical needs, researching literature and searching patents. Working in small entrepreneurial multidisciplinary teams, students gain exposure to clinical and scientific literature review, techniques of intellectual property analysis and feasibility, basic prototyping and market assessment. Students create, analyze and screen medical technology ideas, and select projects for future development. Final presentations at the end of the winter quarter to a panel of prominent inventors and investors in medical technology provide the impetus for further work in the spring quarter. Course format includes expert guest lecturers (Thu: 4:15 to 6:05 pm), faculty-led practical demonstrations and coaching sessions, and interactive team meetings (Tues: 4:15 to 6:05 pm). Projects from previous years included: prevention of hip fractures in the elderly; methods to accelerate healing after surgery; less invasive techniques for bariatric surgery; point of care diagnostics to improve emergency room efficiency; novel devices to bring specialty-type of care to primary care community doctors. More than 300,000 patients have been treated to date with technologies developed as part of this program and more than thirty venture-backed companies were started by alums of the program. Students must apply and be accepted into the course. The application is available online at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/bdn/courses/bioe374.jsp.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ME 368A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, MED 272A)

This is the first quarter of a two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/ OIT 385). In this course, students learn how to develop comprehensive solutions (most commonly medical devices) to some of the most significant medical problems. The first quarter includes an introduction to needs finding methods, brainstorming and concept creation. Students learn strategies for understanding and interpreting clinical needs, researching literature and searching patents. Working in small entrepreneurial multidisciplinary teams, students gain exposure to clinical and scientific literature review, techniques of intellectual property analysis and feasibility, basic prototyping and market assessment. Students create, analyze and screen medical technology ideas, and select projects for future development. Final presentations at the end of the winter quarter to a panel of prominent inventors and investors in medical technology provide the impetus for further work in the spring quarter. Course format includes expert guest lecturers (Thu: 4:15 to 6:05 pm), faculty-led practical demonstrations and coaching sessions, and interactive team meetings (Tues: 4:15 to 6:05 pm). Projects from previous years included: prevention of hip fractures in the elderly; methods to accelerate healing after surgery; less invasive techniques for bariatric surgery; point of care diagnostics to improve emergency room efficiency; novel devices to bring specialty-type of care to primary care community doctors. More than 300,000 patients have been treated to date with technologies developed as part of this program and more than thirty venture-backed companies were started by alums of the program. Students must apply and be accepted into the course. The application is available online at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/bdn/courses/bioe374.jsp.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 272A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, ME 368A)

This is the first quarter of a two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/ OIT 385). In this course, students learn how to develop comprehensive solutions (most commonly medical devices) to some of the most significant medical problems. The first quarter includes an introduction to needs finding methods, brainstorming and concept creation. Students learn strategies for understanding and interpreting clinical needs, researching literature and searching patents. Working in small entrepreneurial multidisciplinary teams, students gain exposure to clinical and scientific literature review, techniques of intellectual property analysis and feasibility, basic prototyping and market assessment. Students create, analyze and screen medical technology ideas, and select projects for future development. Final presentations at the end of the winter quarter to a panel of prominent inventors and investors in medical technology provide the impetus for further work in the spring quarter. Course format includes expert guest lecturers (Thu: 4:15 to 6:05 pm), faculty-led practical demonstrations and coaching sessions, and interactive team meetings (Tues: 4:15 to 6:05 pm). Projects from previous years included: prevention of hip fractures in the elderly; methods to accelerate healing after surgery; less invasive techniques for bariatric surgery; point of care diagnostics to improve emergency room efficiency; novel devices to bring specialty-type of care to primary care community doctors. More than 300,000 patients have been treated to date with technologies developed as part of this program and more than thirty venture-backed companies were started by alums of the program. Students must apply and be accepted into the course. The application is available online at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/bdn/courses/bioe374.jsp.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

OIT 384: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation

This is the first quarter of a two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/ OIT 385). In this course, students learn how to develop comprehensive solutions (most commonly medical devices) to some of the most significant medical problems. The first quarter includes an introduction to needs finding methods, brainstorming and concept creation. Students learn strategies for understanding and interpreting clinical needs, researching literature and searching patents. Working in small entrepreneurial multidisciplinary teams, students gain exposure to clinical and scientific literature review, techniques of intellectual property analysis and feasibility, basic prototyping and market assessment. Students create, analyze and screen medical technology ideas, and select projects for future development. Final presentations at the end of the winter quarter to a panel of prominent inventors and investors in medical technology provide the impetus for further work in the spring quarter. Course format includes expert guest lecturers (Thu: 4:15 to 6:05 pm), faculty-led practical demonstrations and coaching sessions, and interactive team meetings (Tues: 4:15 to 6:05 pm). Projects from previous years included: prevention of hip fractures in the elderly; methods to accelerate healing after surgery; less invasive techniques for bariatric surgery; point of care diagnostics to improve emergency room efficiency; novel devices to bring specialty-type of care to primary care community doctors. More than 300,000 patients have been treated to date with technologies developed as part of this program and more than thirty venture-backed companies were started by alums of the program. Students must apply and be accepted into the course. The application is available online at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/bdn/courses/bioe374.jsp.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

OIT 581: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation

OIT581 is a two-unit version of the Biodesign Innovation course ( OIT384). In this course, students learn how to develop comprehensive solutions (most commonly medical devices) to some of the most significant medical problems. In OIT581, students learn the basic principles of biodesign innovation: methods of validating medical needs; techniques for analyzing intellectual property; basics of regulatory (FDA) and reimbursement planning; early market analysis; design principles; brainstorming and early prototyping; university licensing. Course format includes expert guest lecturers and faculty-led practical demonstrations. Students apply the concepts learned by serving as "commercialization and marketing consultants" to multidisciplinary teams of students in the four-unit course ( OIT 384). Consultants interact with their teams on a regular basis and provide a consulting report on market analysis and competitive dynamics. Projects from previous years included: prevention of hip fractures in the elderly; methods to accelerate healing after surgery; less invasive procedures to perform bariatric surgery; low cost healing devices for diabetic ulcers; point of care diagnostics to improve emergency room efficiency; novel devices to bring specialty-type of care to primary care community doctors. More than 40,000 patients have been treated to date with technologies developed as part of this program and more than ten venture-backed companies were started by alums of the program.nnnStudents must apply and be accepted into the course. The application is available online at http://www.stanford.edu/group/biodesign/courseapplication.html, and the application deadline is November 20, 2010. Students must indicate whether they are applying for the four-unit version ( OIT384) or two-unit version ( OIT581).
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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