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1 - 2 of 2 results for: BIOE 242: LAW, TECHNOLOGY, AND LIBERTY

BIOE 242: LAW, TECHNOLOGY, AND LIBERTY (ENGR 243)

New technologies from gene editing to networked computing have already transformed our economic and social structures and are increasingly changing what it means to be human. What role has law played in regulating and shaping these technologies? And what role can and should it play in the future? This seminar will consider these and related questions, focusing on new forms of networked production, the new landscape of security and scarcity, and the meaning of human nature and ecology in an era of rapid technological change. Readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including science and engineering, political economy, and law. The course will feature several guest speakers. There are no formal prerequisites in either engineering or law, but students should be committed to pursuing novel questions in an interdisciplinary context. The enrollment goal is to balance the class composition between law and non-law students. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, more »
New technologies from gene editing to networked computing have already transformed our economic and social structures and are increasingly changing what it means to be human. What role has law played in regulating and shaping these technologies? And what role can and should it play in the future? This seminar will consider these and related questions, focusing on new forms of networked production, the new landscape of security and scarcity, and the meaning of human nature and ecology in an era of rapid technological change. Readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including science and engineering, political economy, and law. The course will feature several guest speakers. There are no formal prerequisites in either engineering or law, but students should be committed to pursuing novel questions in an interdisciplinary context. The enrollment goal is to balance the class composition between law and non-law students. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. This course is cross-listed with the School of Engineering (TBA). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Endy, A. (PI)

LAW 4014: Law, Technology, and Liberty

New technologies from gene editing to networked computing have already transformed our economic and social structures and are increasingly changing what it means to be human. What role has law played in regulating and shaping these technologies? And what role can and should it play in the future? This seminar will consider these and related questions, focusing on new forms of networked production, the new landscape of security and scarcity, and the meaning of human nature and ecology in an era of rapid technological change. Readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including science and engineering, political economy, and law. The course will feature several guest speakers. There are no formal prerequisites in either engineering or law, but students should be committed to pursuing novel questions in an interdisciplinary context. The enrollment goal is to balance the class composition between law and non-law students. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, more »
New technologies from gene editing to networked computing have already transformed our economic and social structures and are increasingly changing what it means to be human. What role has law played in regulating and shaping these technologies? And what role can and should it play in the future? This seminar will consider these and related questions, focusing on new forms of networked production, the new landscape of security and scarcity, and the meaning of human nature and ecology in an era of rapid technological change. Readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including science and engineering, political economy, and law. The course will feature several guest speakers. There are no formal prerequisites in either engineering or law, but students should be committed to pursuing novel questions in an interdisciplinary context. The enrollment goal is to balance the class composition between law and non-law students. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. This course is cross-listed with Bioengineering ( BIOE 242) and Engineering ( ENGR 243) .
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
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