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1 - 3 of 3 results for: CEE207

CEE 207A: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storag more »
Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 207R: E3: Extreme Energy Efficiency (CEE 107R)

Be part of a unique and intense six day course about extreme energy efficiency taking place during Spring Break 2018 at Rocky Mountain Institute's Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado! The course will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, with each day covering a different energy theme: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) will design a series of lectures, exercises, and interactive activities synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Enginee more »
Be part of a unique and intense six day course about extreme energy efficiency taking place during Spring Break 2018 at Rocky Mountain Institute's Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado! The course will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, with each day covering a different energy theme: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) will design a series of lectures, exercises, and interactive activities synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Engineering, the approach for optimizing the whole system for multiple benefits. Students will work closely and interactively with RMI staff including Amory Lovins, cofounder and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI). Exercises will illuminate challenges RMI has faced and solutions it has created in real-world design. Students will explore clean-sheet solutions that meet end-use demands and optimize whole-system resource efficiency, often with expanding rather than diminishing returns to investments, i.e. making big savings cheaper than small ones. Students will meet as a class once during winter quarter to discuss preparation and spring break logistics. Students must pay for their own travel to and from Basalt, CO (~$400-$600). Course will take place Sunday, March 25 - Friday, March 30. Lodging and food will be covered during the course. Must apply - instructor approval required. All backgrounds and disciplines, both undergraduate and graduate, are welcome to apply. Prerequisite - completion of one of the following courses is required: CEE 107A, CEE 207A, Earthsys 103, CEE 107S, CEE 207S, CEE 176A, CEE 176B. Contact Diana Ginnebaugh at moongdes@stanford.edu for an application. Course website: https://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207r/
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 207S: Energy Resources: Fuels and Tools (CEE 107S)

Energy is a vital part of our daily lives. This course examines where that energy comes from, and the advantages and disadvantages across different fuels. Contextual analysis of energy decisions for transportation and electricity generation around the world. Energy resources covered include oil, biomass, natural gas, nuclear, hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and emerging technologies. Prerequisites: Algebra. Note: may not be taken by students who have completed CEE 173A, CEE 207 or EARTHSYS 103.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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