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1 - 9 of 9 results for: PHIL150

CS 224U: Natural Language Understanding (LINGUIST 188, LINGUIST 288)

Project-oriented class focused on developing systems and algorithms for robust machine understanding of human language. Draws on theoretical concepts from linguistics, natural language processing, and machine learning. Topics include lexical semantics, distributed representations of meaning, relation extraction, semantic parsing, sentiment analysis, and dialogue agents, with special lectures on developing projects, presenting research results, and making connections with industry. Prerequisites: one of LINGUIST 180, CS 124, CS 224N, CS224S, or CS221; and logical/semantics such as LINGUIST 130A or B, CS 157, or PHIL150
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 188: Natural Language Understanding (CS 224U, LINGUIST 288)

Project-oriented class focused on developing systems and algorithms for robust machine understanding of human language. Draws on theoretical concepts from linguistics, natural language processing, and machine learning. Topics include lexical semantics, distributed representations of meaning, relation extraction, semantic parsing, sentiment analysis, and dialogue agents, with special lectures on developing projects, presenting research results, and making connections with industry. Prerequisites: one of LINGUIST 180, CS 124, CS 224N, CS224S, or CS221; and logical/semantics such as LINGUIST 130A or B, CS 157, or PHIL150
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 288: Natural Language Understanding (CS 224U, LINGUIST 188)

Project-oriented class focused on developing systems and algorithms for robust machine understanding of human language. Draws on theoretical concepts from linguistics, natural language processing, and machine learning. Topics include lexical semantics, distributed representations of meaning, relation extraction, semantic parsing, sentiment analysis, and dialogue agents, with special lectures on developing projects, presenting research results, and making connections with industry. Prerequisites: one of LINGUIST 180, CS 124, CS 224N, CS224S, or CS221; and logical/semantics such as LINGUIST 130A or B, CS 157, or PHIL150
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 162: Philosophy of Mathematics (PHIL 162)

Mathematics is a very peculiar human activity. It delivers a type of knowledge that is particularly stable, often conceived as a priori and necessary. Moreover, this knowledge is about abstract entities, which seem to have no connection to us, spatio-temporal creatures, and yet it plays a crucial role in our scientific endeavors. Many philosophical questions emerge naturally: What is the nature of mathematical objects? How can we learn anything about them? Where does the stability of mathematics comes from? What is the significance of results showing the limits of such knowledge, such as Gödel's incompleteness theorem? The first part of the course will survey traditional approaches to philosophy of mathematics ("the big Isms") and consider the viability of their answers to some of the previous questions: logicism, intuitionism, Hilbert's program, empiricism, fictionalism, and structuralism. The second part will focus on philosophical issues emerging from the actual practice of mathemat more »
Mathematics is a very peculiar human activity. It delivers a type of knowledge that is particularly stable, often conceived as a priori and necessary. Moreover, this knowledge is about abstract entities, which seem to have no connection to us, spatio-temporal creatures, and yet it plays a crucial role in our scientific endeavors. Many philosophical questions emerge naturally: What is the nature of mathematical objects? How can we learn anything about them? Where does the stability of mathematics comes from? What is the significance of results showing the limits of such knowledge, such as Gödel's incompleteness theorem? The first part of the course will survey traditional approaches to philosophy of mathematics ("the big Isms") and consider the viability of their answers to some of the previous questions: logicism, intuitionism, Hilbert's program, empiricism, fictionalism, and structuralism. The second part will focus on philosophical issues emerging from the actual practice of mathematics. We will tackle questions such as: Why do mathematicians re-prove the same theorems? What is the role of visualization in mathematics? How can mathematical knowledge be effective in natural science? To conclude, we will explore the aesthetic dimension of mathematics, focusing on mathematical beauty. Prerequisite: PHIL150 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 150: Mathematical Logic (PHIL 250)

An introduction to the concepts and techniques used in mathematical logic, focusing on propositional, modal, and predicate logic. Highlights connections with philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics, and neighboring fields.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 150E: Logic in Action: A New Introduction to Logic

A new introduction to logic, covering propositional, modal, and first-order logic, with special attention to major applications in describing information and information-driven action. Highlights connections with philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics, and neighboring fields. Based on the open source course 'Logic in Action,' available online at http://www.logicinaction.org/.nFulfills the undergraduate philosophy logic requirement.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 150X: Mathematical Logic

Equivalent to the second half of 150. Students attend the first meeting of 150 and rejoin the class on October 30. Prerequisite: CS 103A or X, or PHIL 50.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 162: Philosophy of Mathematics (MATH 162)

Mathematics is a very peculiar human activity. It delivers a type of knowledge that is particularly stable, often conceived as a priori and necessary. Moreover, this knowledge is about abstract entities, which seem to have no connection to us, spatio-temporal creatures, and yet it plays a crucial role in our scientific endeavors. Many philosophical questions emerge naturally: What is the nature of mathematical objects? How can we learn anything about them? Where does the stability of mathematics comes from? What is the significance of results showing the limits of such knowledge, such as Gödel's incompleteness theorem? The first part of the course will survey traditional approaches to philosophy of mathematics ("the big Isms") and consider the viability of their answers to some of the previous questions: logicism, intuitionism, Hilbert's program, empiricism, fictionalism, and structuralism. The second part will focus on philosophical issues emerging from the actual practice of mathemat more »
Mathematics is a very peculiar human activity. It delivers a type of knowledge that is particularly stable, often conceived as a priori and necessary. Moreover, this knowledge is about abstract entities, which seem to have no connection to us, spatio-temporal creatures, and yet it plays a crucial role in our scientific endeavors. Many philosophical questions emerge naturally: What is the nature of mathematical objects? How can we learn anything about them? Where does the stability of mathematics comes from? What is the significance of results showing the limits of such knowledge, such as Gödel's incompleteness theorem? The first part of the course will survey traditional approaches to philosophy of mathematics ("the big Isms") and consider the viability of their answers to some of the previous questions: logicism, intuitionism, Hilbert's program, empiricism, fictionalism, and structuralism. The second part will focus on philosophical issues emerging from the actual practice of mathematics. We will tackle questions such as: Why do mathematicians re-prove the same theorems? What is the role of visualization in mathematics? How can mathematical knowledge be effective in natural science? To conclude, we will explore the aesthetic dimension of mathematics, focusing on mathematical beauty. Prerequisite: PHIL150 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 351D: Measurement Theory

What does it mean to assign numbers to beliefs (as Bayesian probability theorists do), desires (as economists and philosophers who discuss utilities do), or perceptions (as researchers in psychometrics often do)? What is the relationship between the numbers and the underlying reality they purport to measure? Measurement theory helps answer these questions using representation theorems, which link structural features of numerical scales (such as probabilities, utilities, or degrees of loudness) to structural features of relations (such as comparative belief, preference, or judgments that one sound is louder than another).nThis course will introduce students to measurement theory, and its applications in psychophysics and decision theory. n2 unit option only for Philosophy PhD students who are past their second year.nPrerequisites: Undergraduates wishing to take this course must have previously taken PHIL150, and may only enroll with permission from the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Briggs, R. (PI)
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