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EARTHSYS 106: World Food Economy (EARTHSYS 206, ECON 106, ECON 206, ESS 106, ESS 206)

The economics of food production, consumption, and trade. The micro- and macro- determinants of food supply and demand, including the interrelationship among food, income, population, and public-sector decision making. Emphasis on the role of agriculture in poverty alleviation, economic development, and environmental outcomes. (graduate students enroll in 206)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 106C: Why are Scientists Engineering Our Food?

This lecture and discussion course will review the scientific evidence on the use and impacts of genetic engineering in global food and agricultural systems. The class will cover the history and details of crop genetic improvement, ranging from primitive domestication to CRISPR technologies. We will examine the risks and benefits of crop genetic technologies in agriculture with regards to productivity, farm incomes, food safety, human health and nutrition, and environmental impacts. We will also discuss the current and future use of genetic engineering techniques for enhancing climate resilience and nutritional outcomes in agricultural systems worldwide. Finally, we will discuss the ethics of using modern genetic approaches for crop improvement, and the policy environment surrounding the use of these genetic techniques.nnOur expectation is that students enrolled in the course will attend all class sections and participate actively in the discussions. Students will be asked to identify more »
This lecture and discussion course will review the scientific evidence on the use and impacts of genetic engineering in global food and agricultural systems. The class will cover the history and details of crop genetic improvement, ranging from primitive domestication to CRISPR technologies. We will examine the risks and benefits of crop genetic technologies in agriculture with regards to productivity, farm incomes, food safety, human health and nutrition, and environmental impacts. We will also discuss the current and future use of genetic engineering techniques for enhancing climate resilience and nutritional outcomes in agricultural systems worldwide. Finally, we will discuss the ethics of using modern genetic approaches for crop improvement, and the policy environment surrounding the use of these genetic techniques.nnOur expectation is that students enrolled in the course will attend all class sections and participate actively in the discussions. Students will be asked to identify peer-reviewed, scientific papers on the impacts of specific crop genetic improvements. Depending on the class size, students will also be asked to help lead class discussions. At the end of the course, students will work in groups to debate a selected topic on the use of genetic engineering in agriculture, to be announced during the course.nnPrerequisites: One course in biology and one course in economics are suggested. Completion of "Feeding Nine Billion" and "The World Food Economy" classes would also be helpful, as would a class in genetics, but there are no strict course requirements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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