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1 - 3 of 3 results for: ANTHRO125

ANTHRO 125: Language and the Environment (ANTHRO 225)

Lecture course on vocabulary and grammar as keys to peoples¿ understanding and use of the environment. Ethnobotany, ethnobiology, and ethnosemantics in the analysis of the language of place, plants and animals, the earth, the body, and disease. Terminological gaps and gluts and what they imply. Language as a strategic resource in environmental management. Language contact and conflict in the modern global environment, with particular attention to the vocabularies of capitalism and property. Language extinction and its environmental implications. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 125A: International Criminal Courts and the Question of Global Justice

What are the cultural, legal and political implications of the global extrapolation of our understanding of the rule of law, in general, and criminal law, in particular? This course will look at the theory and practice of the new international criminal courts, the criminalization and individualization (or humanization) of international law, and the broader system of cosmopolitan order that it presupposes, with special reference to how it differs from earlier projects for international order (international law, war crimes, human rights, and the UN system). Case studies will follow the historical development of the key institutions, individuals and legal precedents that have been determinative for the new international criminal jurisdiction, including Nuremberg and Tokyo, the ad hoc (Yugoslavia, Rwanda) and hybrid tribunals (Liberia, Sierra Leone, Lebanon, Cambodia) and now the International Criminal Court (DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan, Libya and Kenya).nn
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 125S: International Criminal Courts and the Question of Global Justice

What are the cultural, legal and political implications of the globalization of our understanding of the rule of law, in general, and criminal law, in particular? This course will look at the theory and practice of the new international criminal courts, the criminalization and individualization (or humanization) of international law, and the broader system of cosmopolitan order that it presupposes, with special reference to how it differs from earlier projects for international order (international law, war crimes, human rights, and the UN system). Case studies will follow the historical development of the key institutions, individuals and legal precedents that have been determinative for the new international criminal jurisdiction, including Nuremberg and Tokyo, the ad hoc (Yugoslavia, Rwanda) and hybrid tribunals (Liberia, Sierra Leone, Lebanon Cambodia) and now the International Criminal Court (DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan, Libya and Kenya).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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