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1 - 2 of 2 results for: MGTECON 620

FINANCE 632: Empirical Dynamic Asset Pricing

This course explores the interplay between dynamic asset pricing theory, statistical assumptions about sources of risk, and the choice of econometric methods for analysis of asset return data. Therefore, the lectures will be a blend of theory, econometric method, and critical review of empirical studies. Both arbitrage-free and equilibrium preference-based pricing models will be discussed, with particular emphasis given to recent developments and outstanding puzzles in the literature. nnnThe prerequisites for F632 are MGTECON 603 - 604, Finance 620, Finance 622, and Finance 625. In particular, I will assume familiarity with dynamic asset pricing theory, at the level of F622; and large-sample theory for least-squares, generalized method-of-moments, and maximum likelihood estimation methods. We will review these methods in the context of specific applications, but this material will not be developed in depth.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

MGTECON 620: Economics of Electronic Commerce and the Internet

This course is designed to introduce students to research topics in electronic commerce and the economics of the internet. The primary audience is advanced graduate students in economics or closely related areas, but the course is also open to students from related fields such as computer science and operations provided students have completed graduate coursework in economics, game theory, and/or market design. The methodological focus is on applied economic theory models, empirical work, and field experiments. The course requires a literature review and research proposal, which will be presented to the class at the end of the term. Core topics include: economics of platform markets and multi-sided markets, with case studies including online advertising, online auctions, mobile computing, cloud computing, electronic and mobile payment systems, and media markets; markets for information; internet search, including specialized search platforms such as shopping and travel; the impact of the internet on the news media; and the impact of technological and business practice shifts on both old and new industries, including data-driven decision-making, machine learning, and increased reliance on experimentation. Other topics that may be selected according to student interest include social networks, social media, intellectual property and innovation, broader economic impacts of technological innovation, security, internet policy, the impact of the internet on education and health, privacy, and other regulatory issues surrounding the internet.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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