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1 - 10 of 84 results for: GSBGEN

GSBGEN 113N: The Economic Survival of the Performing Arts

Even the most artistically accomplished and well-managed performing arts organizations--symphony orchestras, operas, dance companies, and many theaters--tend to live on the edge financially. In fact, most performing arts groups are organized as nonprofit organizations, because they cannot make enough money to cover costs and survive as profit-seeking businesses. In this seminar we will explore the reasons for the tension between artistic excellence and economic security,drawing on the experience of performing arts organizations in the United States and in countries(whose governments have adopted quite different policies toward the arts). Using economic concepts and analysis that we develop in the seminar, you will first examine the fundamental reasons for the economic challenges faced by performing arts organizations. In later sessions, we will consider and evaluate alternative solutions to these challenges in the United States and other countries. The seminar may include meetings with managers and/or trustees of arts organizations.nnBy the end of the seminar, you will be able to assess the economic condition of an arts organization, evaluate alternative strategies for its survival, and understand the consequences of alternative government policies toward the arts.nnDuring the early part of the course, you will prepare two short papers on topics or questions that I will suggest. Later, you will prepare a longer paper applying concepts learned to one of the performing arts or a particular arts organization that interests you. You will submit that paper in stages, as you learn about concepts and issues that are relevant to your analysis. There will also be a final exam.
Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Flanagan, R. (PI)

GSBGEN 208: Ethics in Management

With leadership comes responsibility. This course explores the numerous ethical duties faced by managers and organizations. It combines analytical frameworks with the latest findings on human behavior to inform a wide range of ethical decisions and strategies. Readings include case studies, insights from experimental psychology and economics, and excerpts from or about major works of moral philosophy. Through online and in-class exercises, discussions, and personal reflection, you will reveal and assess your ethical intuitions, compare them with more explicit modes of ethical thought, and learn how to use ethics in business settings. A diverse set of ethical viewpoints will be considered with an emphasis on not only their implications for ethical behavior but also on the social and cognitive pitfalls that undermine the ability of business leaders to fulfill their ethical duties.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 314: Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies

GSB314 - Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies (4 Units)nnNote: Students who only want to participate in the seminar/discussion portion of the class and not do a team-based project (see details below) may enroll in GSB514 for 2 units.nnnThis course addresses the distinctive challenges and opportunities of launching high-potential new ventures in developing economies. Developing economies are attractive targets for entrepreneurs because many are just starting to move up the growth curve, and they offer low-cost operating environments that can be great development labs for potentially disruptive innovations. They increase in attractiveness when their political institutions stabilize and they become more market-friendly. At the same time, developing economies pose serious challenges. Pioneering entrepreneurs take on significant risks to gain early mover advantages. Specifically, entrepreneurs will not be able to count on the same kind of supportive operating environments that we take for granted in the developed world. They often face cumbersome permit and licensing processes, poorly developed financial and labor markets, problematic import and export procedures, unreliable local supply chains, weak infrastructure, corruption, currency risks, limited investment capital, lack of financial exits and more. This course is designed to help would-be entrepreneurs - both founders and members of entrepreneurial teams - better understand and prepare for these issues as they pursue the opportunities and address the challenges to start, grow, and harvest their ventures in these environments.nnnGSB314 combines a seminar/discussion format (Tuesdays) with a team-based project (Thursdays). For the Tuesday sessions, students will read about and discuss the key challenges described above and potential solutions. Guests will describe their own startup and investing experiences in developing economies and answer questions. A framework based on the recently published World Economic Forum (WEF) report on "Entrepreneurial Ecosystems Around the Globe and Company Growth Dynamics" will be used to structure the course. Each student will prepare a short paper on a topic of interest from this portion of the course.nnnThe Thursday sessions is a team-based exercise for students who either have a specific idea or want to join a team of classmates to pursue more deeply an understanding of the team's country of focus and an initial investigation of the idea's viability. Students must come in willing to be team players and do the work necessary to complete this exercise over the full quarter. Each team member's contributions will be assessed by fellow teammates. Teams will be formed before the start of class or on the first day at the latest. The team will describe, in a final presentation, the challenges and opportunities in their country using the WEF framework. The final presentation will also include the team's thoughts on the viability of their proposed venture and how it capitalizes on their country's assets and addresses its challenges. A detailed business plan is not required; however, specific recommendations and plans for next steps that would be carried out during a 3 to 6 month field and market research study in the country will be part of the final presentation.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 317: Reputation Management: Strategies for Successful Communicators

Successful leaders have to conceive, author, rebuild, pivot, differentiate, and finally maintain a personal reputation to make a lasting, recognizable and powerful identity. Reputation Management will explore how you can effectively communicate to create, adapt and maintain your personal reputation. Your reputation remains fluid as you navigate your career decisions and interact with different professionals along your journey. The course is designed along three interlocking elements: reputation management literature, relevant case studies, and curated guest speakers. Students will learn the fundamentals of strategic corporate communication and the risk of not managing reputation effectively. These frameworks will be extended with specific case studies to illustrate where individuals, groups, and firms have faced the challenge of managing reputation effectively. We will focus on both traditional and virtual components of communication including the relevancy of online reputation management. Finally we will invite well-known leaders from a range of industries who have built and sustained their reputations, through effective communication. Each leader has had to manage their reputations in the public eye, and alongside their peers, supervisors, and employees. Guests will be invited to discuss their conscious and unplanned strategies of how to successfully communicate the kind of person, leader, innovator, or public figure they strive to be. Students will benefit from a rich blend of frameworks, cases, and speakers enabling them to successfully enter the work force and create their own, personal reputations. Students will create a case study drawn from their own experience (or personal network), of a reputation dilemma. A final assignment requires students to articulate their own reputation using any media of the student's choosing and share that with others in the course. Throughout the course students will post at least one blog drawn from class concepts and respond to posts by peers in the class.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 319: Advanced Topics in Philanthropy

We will explore selected topics including: the roles of the philanthropic and nonprofit sectors in society; the justifications for tax-subsidized philanthropy; whether giving to the poor is morally obligatory or discretionary; barriers to the practice of strategic philanthropy; evaluating philanthropic outcomes; impact investing; alternative legal and organizational structures to carry out philanthropic programs, including donor-advised funds, direct giving, support organizations and foundations; and whether foundations should be designed and run to exist in perpetuity or to spend down corpus over a finite lifetime. The course will be structured around the perspective of a high net worth individual who has decided to devote substantial resources to philanthropy and wishes to decide which philanthropic goals to pursue and how best to achieve them. Although there are no formal prerequisites for the course, we will assume that students have experience working at a foundation, nonprofit organization, impact investing fund, or similar organization, or have taken an introductory course in strategic philanthropy such as GSBGEN 381. (There is sufficient overlap with Paul Brest's Autumn course, Measuring and Improving the Impact of Social Enterprises ( GSBGEN 322), that students taking that course should not enroll in this one.) Finally, you should be forewarned that this course has a fair amount of reading - not more than is common in undergraduate and graduate courses, but more than is typical for MBA courses in the GSB.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 322: Measuring and Improving the Impact of Social Enterprises

This course focuses on actionable measurement in government, non-profit organizations, market-based social enterprises, philanthropy, and impact investing. €œActionable€ means that the measurement is used by managers, investors, and other stakeholders in making decisions. nnThe course explores the intersection of several ideas that seem to be in some tension with each other. (1) You can'€™t manage what you can'€™t measure, (2) Measurement is expensive and its results are often ignored, (3) "Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts"€ (apocryphally attributed to Einstein), (4) "The more any quantitative social indicator is used for decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it is intended to monitor." (Campbell'€™s Law). nnSpecifically the course will include:nn- Logic models, theories of change, strategic planning, monitoring, and evaluationnn- Measuring the social impact of governments, non-governmental organizations, and market-based social enterprises, and asking how philanthropists and impact investors can assess their own impactnn- Corporate social responsibility, socially responsible investing, and impact investingnn- Performance measurement, performance contracting, and social impact bondsnn- Techniques for improving the behavior and accountability of individuals and organizationsnnThe classes will be taught mainly through business school case studies, which place the students in the position of CEOs, managers, and investors called upon to make major decisions.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

GSBGEN 335: Clean Energy Project Development and Finance

This case study-oriented course will focus on the critical skills needed to evaluate, develop, finance (on a non-recourse basis), and complete standalone energy and infrastructure projects. The primary course materials will be documents from several representative projects - e.g. wind and carbon capture - covering key areas including market and feasibility studies, environmental permitting and regulatory decisions, financial disclosure from bank and bond transactions, and construction, input, and offtake contracts. Documents from executed transactions are highly customized. By taking a forensic approach, looking at several different deals, we can learn how project developers, financiers, and lawyers work to get deals over the finish line that meet the demands of the market, the requirements of the law, and (sometimes) broader societal goals.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 381: Strategic Philanthropy

Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Strategic Philanthropy will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to over $300 billion in the year 2012. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social change. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations, and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, and venture philanthropy partnerships. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grant making, evaluation, financial management, infrastructure, knowledge management, policy change, and board governance. Guest speakers will consist of high profile philanthropists, foundation presidents, social entrepreneurs and Silicon Valley business leaders creating new philanthropic models. The course will culminate in an individual project in which students will complete a business plan for a $10 million private foundation.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 390: Individual Research

Need approval from sponsoring faculty member and GSB Registrar.
Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: Aaker, J. (PI) ; Abbey, D. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Barth, M. (PI) ; Bayati, M. (PI) ; Bendor, J. (PI) ; Benkard, L. (PI) ; Berk, J. (PI) ; Bernstein, S. (PI) ; Bettinger, E. (PI) ; Beyer, A. (PI) ; Bimpikis, K. (PI) ; Blankespoor, E. (PI) ; Bowen, R. (PI) ; Bowman, K. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Brady, S. (PI) ; Breon-Drish, B. (PI) ; Brest, P. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Burgelman, R. (PI) ; Callander, S. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Casey, K. (PI) ; Ciesinski, S. (PI) ; De Simone, L. (PI) ; DeMarzo, P. (PI) ; Di Tella, S. (PI) ; Diamond, R. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Ellis, J. (PI) ; Feinberg, Y. (PI) ; Ferguson, J. (PI) ; Flanagan, R. (PI) ; Flynn, F. (PI) ; Foarta, D. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Gardete, P. (PI) ; Glickman, M. (PI) ; Glynn, J. (PI) ; Goldberg, A. (PI) ; Greer, L. (PI) ; Grenadier, S. (PI) ; Gruenfeld, D. (PI) ; Gur, Y. (PI) ; Guttentag, B. (PI) ; Halevy, N. (PI) ; Hannan, M. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Hasan, S. (PI) ; Heath, C. (PI) ; Huang, S. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Jenter, D. (PI) ; Jha, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Kasznik, R. (PI) ; Katzir, D. (PI) ; Kelly, P. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Khan, U. (PI) ; Klein, D. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kramer, R. (PI) ; Krehbiel, K. (PI) ; Kreps, D. (PI) ; Krishnamurthy, A. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larcker, D. (PI) ; Lattin, J. (PI) ; Laurin, K. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Lee, C. (PI) ; Lee, G. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Leslie, M. (PI) ; Levav, J. (PI) ; Levine, P. (PI) ; Linbeck, L. (PI) ; Lowery, B. (PI) ; Malhotra, N. (PI) ; Marinovic, I. (PI) ; McDonald, J. (PI) ; McNichols, M. (PI) ; McQuade, T. (PI) ; Meehan, B. (PI) ; Mendelson, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Nair, H. (PI) ; Narayanan, S. (PI) ; Neale, M. (PI) ; O'Reilly, C. (PI) ; Ostrovsky, M. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Parker, G. (PI) ; Patell, J. (PI) ; Perez-Gonzalez, F. (PI) ; Peterson, J. (PI) ; Pfeffer, J. (PI) ; Pfleiderer, P. (PI) ; Piotroski, J. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Powers, J. (PI) ; Rajan, M. (PI) ; Rao, H. (PI) ; Rauh, J. (PI) ; Reguant-Rido, M. (PI) ; Reichelstein, S. (PI) ; Reicher, D. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Rhein, B. (PI) ; Rice, C. (PI) ; Rohan, D. (PI) ; Rosen, H. (PI) ; Sahni, N. (PI) ; Schramm, J. (PI) ; Seiler, S. (PI) ; Shaw, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Siegel, R. (PI) ; Siegelman, R. (PI) ; Simonson, I. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Sorensen, J. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Strebulaev, I. (PI) ; Sugaya, T. (PI) ; Sutton, R. (PI) ; Taweel, K. (PI) ; Tiedens, L. (PI) ; Tonetti, C. (PI) ; Tormala, Z. (PI) ; Vanasco, V. (PI) ; Weaver, G. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Whang, S. (PI) ; Wheeler, S. (PI) ; Wood, D. (PI) ; Yurukoglu, A. (PI) ; Zenios, S. (PI) ; Ziebelman, P. (PI) ; Zwiebel, J. (PI) ; deHaan, E. (PI)

GSBGEN 508: Deals II

This course applies economic concepts to the practice of structuring contracts. The course extends over two quarters, meeting three hours per week the first quarter and two hours per week the second quarter. Students enrolled in the course must take both quarters. All or most of the first quarter is spent in a traditional classroom setting, discussing economics articles and case studies of actual contracts that illustrate the concepts described in the articles. Beginning either at the end of the first quarter or the beginning of the second quarter until the end of the course (the "deals" segment of the course), the class explores the connection between economic theory and contracting practice by studying specific current deals. Students, divided into groups, study a deal beginning in the first quarter. Then, during the deals segment of the course, each group gives a presentation of its deal to the class. The following week, a lawyer or other participant in the deal will come to class and lead a discussion of the deal. When it works, the students' and the practitioners' analyses are mutually enlightening. The course examines new deals each year. Deals that studied over the years have included movie financings, biotech alliances, venture capital financings, cross-border joint ventures, private equity investments, and corporate reorganizations.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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