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1 - 10 of 24 results for: SYMSYS

SYMSYS 100: Introduction to Cognitive and Information Sciences (LINGUIST 144, PHIL 190, PSYCH 35)

The history, foundations, and accomplishments of the cognitive sciences, including presentations by leading Stanford researchers in artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, and psychology. Overview of the issues addressed in the Symbolic Systems major.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SYMSYS 206: Philosophy of Neuroscience (PHIL 167D, PHIL 267D)

Can problems of mind be solved by understanding the brain, or models of the brain? The views of philosophers and neuroscientists who believe so, and others who are skeptical of neurophilosophical approaches to the mind. Historical and recent literature in philosophy and neuroscience. Topics may include perception, memory, neural accounts of consciousness, neurophenomenology, neuroscience and physics, computational models, and eliminativism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SYMSYS 22: History and Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence (CS 22)

More than most emerging fields, the history of Artificial Intelligence has been characterized by passionate debates. Is it merely clever programming, or an expedition into the fundamental nature of intelligence? Will machines ever be conscious? Will robots assist or enslave us? Can self-driving cars be legally responsible for their actions? This course recounts the history of AI and explores the major controversies through a series of classroom discussions, each in preparation for a lively debate by prominent historical figures and cutting-edge researchers in the field. Open to all undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Kaplan, J. (PI)

SYMSYS 130: Research Methods in the Cognitive and Information Sciences

Understanding the different methodological approaches used in disciplines that study cognition and information. Emphasis is on philosophical/analytical, formal/mathematical, empirical, and computational thinking styles, with some attention to other methods as well. What assumptions underlie these methods? How can they be combined? How do practitioners of each discipline think differently about problems, and what are the challenges involved in studying or working across them?
Terms: given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SYMSYS 150: CRYPTOCURRENCIES SEMINAR

A weekly seminar allowing students the opportunity to discuss and explore cryptocurrencies from a variety of domains and view points:nn1) Explore the history of fiat currencies, both economically and philosophically. How does Bitcoin mesh in here? What are advantages and disadvantages compared to traditional fiat currencies? (~2 weeks) n2) Contextualize and juxtapose decentralized currencies with respect to TCP/IP, Napster, and other relevant decentralized and cloud protocols. (~2 weeks)n3) Work through and understand Satoshi¿s initial protocol and proof-of-work mining system. What problem did she solve? How? Why was it important? How can we prove it mathematically? What are significant game theoretic and cryptographic weaknesses? What do alternative cryptocurrencies look like? Is there a `best¿ alternative? (~3 weeks)n4) What does ¿Bitcoin as a protocol¿ mean? What can be built on top of it? What¿s being built around it? What does regulation look like? What are hypotheses for the future of digital currencies? How do we explain investor confidence, given regulatory hesitation? (~3 weeks)
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dar, Z. (PI)

SYMSYS 170: Decision Behavior: Theory and Evidence (SYMSYS 270)

Introduction to the study of judgment and decision making, relating theory and evidence from disciplines such as psychology, economics, statistics, neuroscience, and philosophy. The development and critique of Homo economicus as a model of human behavior, and more recent theories based on empirical findings. Recommended: background in formal reasoning.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SYMSYS 190: Senior Honors Tutorial

Under the supervision of their faculty honors adviser, students work on their senior honors project. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SYMSYS 191: Senior Honors Seminar

Recommended for seniors doing an honors project. Under the leadership of the Symbolic Systems program coordinator, students discuss, and present their honors project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SYMSYS 196: Independent Study

Independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. Can be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SYMSYS 200: Symbolic Systems in Practice

Applying a Symbolic Systems education at Stanford and outside. The basics of research and practice. Students develop and present a project, and investigate different career paths, including academic, industrial, professional, and public service, through interviews with alumni.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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