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1 - 10 of 46 results for: STRAMGT

STRAMGT 321: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch I

This is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from idea to launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the Sloan and MBA programs, together with other graduate students within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations, but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter they will further refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The new course builds on a predecessor course S356 "Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities" and encapsulates new and important research and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is primarily learning by doing (LBD) through a structured process and supported by relevant lectures. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by experienced mentors and review by peers. Field research as well as prototype product development are integral to the course. Since admittance to S321/S322 is by team and the quality of their idea, team formation takes place during the autumn quarter. Informal student mixers and seminars will be held to facilitate team formation and idea generation. Each team must consist of at least 2 enrolled Sloan students and preferably 1-2 enrolled graduate students from the MBA program or other Schools - Engineering, Medicine, Law, Science, Education - to bring diversity and depth to the team. The application-selection process is described on the S321/S322 website.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 322: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch II

This is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture from idea to launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the Sloan and MBA programs, together with other graduate students within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations, but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter they will further refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The course is taught by a serial entrepreneur and former CEO who also led and taught the predecessor course S356 "Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities". The new course builds on this experience and encapsulates new and important research and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is primarily learning by doing (LBD) through a structured process and supported by relevant lectures. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by experienced mentors and review by peers. Field research as well as prototype product development are integral to the course. Since admittance to S321/S322 is by team and the quality of their idea, team formation takes place during the autumn quarter. Informal student mixers and seminars will be held to facilitate team formation and idea generation. Each team must consist of at least 2 enrolled Sloan students and preferably 1-2 enrolled graduate students from the MBA program or other Schools to bring diversity and depth to the team. The application-selection process is described on the S321/S322 website.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 353: Entrepreneurship: Formation of New Ventures

This course is offered for students who at some time may want to undertake an entrepreneurial career by pursuing opportunities leading to partial or full ownership and control of a business. The course deals with case situations from the point of view of the entrepreneur/manager rather than the passive investor. Many cases involve visitors, since the premise is that opportunity and action have large idiosyncratic components. Students must assess opportunity and action in light of the perceived capabilities of the individuals and the nature of the environments they face. The course is integrative and will allow students to apply many facets of their business school education. Each section will have a specific focus, please select the instructor(s) with your interests: Leslie, Siegelman - High tech ventures; Ellis, Chambers, Childs - Diverse types of ventures; Ellis, Foster - Diverse types of ventures; Siegel, Brady - High tech emphasis, but diverse types of ventures; Siegelman, Hattendorf - Social ventures; Reiss, Chess - Very early stage ventures.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 354: Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital

Many of America's most successful entrepreneurial companies have been substantially influenced by professionally managed venture capital. This relationship is examined from both the entrepreneur's and the venture capitalist's perspective. From the point of view of the entrepreneur, the course considers how significant business opportunities are identified, planned, and built into real companies; how resources are matched with opportunity; and how, within this framework, entrepreneurs seek capital and other assistance from venture capitalists or other sources. From the point of view of the venture capitalist, the course considers how potential entrepreneurial investments are evaluated, valued, structured, and enhanced; how different venture capital strategies are deployed; and how venture capitalists raise and manage their own funds. The course includes a term-long project where students work in teams (4-5 students per team) to write a business plan for a venture of the team's choosing.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 356: The Startup Garage: Design

Startup Garage is an intensive hands-on, project-based course, in which graduate students will apply the concepts of design thinking, engineering, finance, business and organizational skills to design and test new business concepts that address real world needs . Our aspiration is to help teams identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. Even those teams that do not successfully launch a venture, or individuals who decide not to move forward, will learn critical, cutting-edge techniques about starting and launching a venture. nnnCollaborative, multi-disciplinary teams will identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify and deeply understand customer needs, then proceed to design products or services and a business model to address those needs. .Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the product or service and the business model. nnnThis course is offered by the Graduate School of Business. It integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. The course focuses on developing entrepreneurial skills (using short lectures and in-class exercises) and then applying these skills to specific problems faced by those users identified by the teams. Teams will ?get out of the building? and interact directly with users and advisors to develop a deep understanding of the challenges they face and to field test their proposed services, products, and business models.nn
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 366: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch

Teams that concluded at the end of the fall quarter that their preliminary product or service and business model suggest a path to viability, continue with the winter quarter course. In this course, the teams develop more elaborate versions of their product/service and business model , perform a series of experiments to test the key hypotheses about their product and business model, and prepare and present an investor pitch for a seed round of financing to a panel of seasoned investors and entrepreneurs.nn nnThe key premise for the course is that a robust venture creation process involves development and validation of a series of hypotheses about a new product or service, its value proposition, and how the business will acquire customers, make money, scale up to achieve profitability, and raise funds to achieve the key milestones to profitability. In Startup Garage: Testing and Launch, teams will learn how to precisely formulate these hypotheses and early stage milestones, and how to test them using one or more of the following low-cost approaches: a) online experiments with minimally viable products; b) interviews with partners, advisors, investors, and business experts; c) analogies from existing businesses that were successful in proving hypotheses that are analogous to what the newstartup wants to prove.nn nnThe course focuses on further developing entrepreneurial skills using the same pedagogical approach used in S356: short lectures, extensive in-class exercises focused on each team?s specific projects, and ?get out of the building? assignments. Teams will have the opportunity to:nnn- ?Get out of the building and interact with users, advisors, investors and partners to develop a deep understanding of the challenges they face, to field test their proposed services, products, and business models, and to gather data.nnn- Interpret the data and make important startup decisions in the context of their own project: pivot, persevere, or perishnnn- Develop creative go-to-market strategies and test their effectivenessnnn- Develop and deliver in front of real investors an investor pitch, elevator pitch and executive summarynnn- Negotiate term sheets with venture investorsnnn- Develop a hiring plan for their first year of operation and consider equity and other compensation plan
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 368: Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures

This course seeks to provide a survey of the strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations and their executive and board leaders, in the era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. The students will also be introduced to core managerial issues uniquely defined by this sector such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance. The course also provides an overview of the sector, including its history and economics. Cases involve a range of nonprofits, from smaller, social entrepreneurial to larger, more traditional organizations, including education, social service, environment, health care, religion, NGO's and performing arts. In exploring these issues, this course reinforces the frameworks and concepts of strategic management introduced in the core first year courses. In addition to case discussions, the course employs role plays, study group exercises and many outsider speakers.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Meehan, B. (PI)

STRAMGT 512: The Yin and Yang of Family Business Transitions

This seminar provides students with practical solutions to some of the challenges faced in family business transitions.nnnFamily businesses are by far the dominant form of commerce world-wide, albeit the majority are small "mom and pop shops." Some research shows that large businesses, whatever the form of ownership, have an average lifespan of around forty years, while small businesses (at least in Japan and Europe) average around twelve years. So, if businesses in general do not survive, then it is a wonder that any family business can survive from one generation to another, let alone two, three, four or more.nnnThere are three essential requirements to succeed in a family business transition. First, it may seem obvious that the business must succeed, but it is less obvious what advantages a family business has over its non-family-owned counterparts. Second, the ownership structure must effectively maintain family cohesion and support the business. Finally, family members need to organize in thoughtful ways to work effectively with one another.nnnThe beauty of a family business is that it can be more profitable than companies with non-family ownership. Two fundamentals, at least, provide this advantage - a strong value system and a long-term economic perspective. The operative word above, however, is "can"; it is by no means a foregone conclusion that a family business will be more successful. Families must thoughtfully develop their advantages, while at the same time avoiding the pitfalls inherent in any family business.nnnAccordingly, this course is offered for students whose families own a family business or who are interested in the special challenges faced by family businesses. International students are encouraged to register as different cultural perspectives to family business will enrich the experience for everyone. Particular focus will be given to the transitions from one generation to another and the lessons learned that can be applied during the entire life of the business.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: Francis, P. (PI)

STRAMGT 526: Managing to Outcomes in Government, Education, and Nonprofit Organizations

This course focuses on actionable measurement in government agencies, non-profit organizations, and schools. Actionable means that the measurement is used by managers and other stakeholders to make decisions, influence behavior, and hold agents accountable. The course explores the intersection of several ideas that seem to be in some tension with each other. (1) You can't manage what you can't measure, (2) Measurement is expensive and its results are often ignored, (3) Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts (apocryphally attributed to Einstein), (4) The more any quantitative social indicator is used for decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it is intended to monitor. (Campbell's Law). Among other things, we will consider logic models, theories of change, strategic design, monitoring and evaluation, social impact measures, performance contracting, and techniques for improving the behavior and accountability of individuals and organizations. The classes will be taught mainly through case studies that place the students in the position of managers and stakeholders called upon to make decisions. We will examine the challenges of managing to outcomes in various contexts, including government agencies (e.g., police departments), nonprofit organizations, and schools. We will also look at innovative funding vehicles that depend on measuring outcomes, such conditional and unconditional cash transfers, pay for performance schemes, and social impact bonds.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

STRAMGT 535: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

This course will investigate the ways in which entrepreneurs have and could transform K-12 public schooling in the United States, a $650 billion dollar industry that has a direct and long-term effect on nation¿s economy, democracy and culture. We will explore how human capital solutions, new schools, and technology products can all dramatically improve student learning and solve pain points. We will study a variety of ways to evaluate the efficacy, scalability, and financial sustainability of entrepreneurial enterprises serving students, families, educators and administrators in public education. The course will feature for-profit, not-for-profit, as well as double-bottom-line organizations. This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, donors or investors. Gloria Lee is a serial education entrepreneur who co-founded Aspire Public Schools, Teaching Channel, and Yu Ming Charter School. She is currently Chief Operating Officer at NewSchools Venture Fund. This course was designed to be taken in tandem with STRAMGT 537: Leading Change in Public Education and the courses will be highly complementary in approach.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Lee, G. (PI)
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