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1 - 10 of 37 results for: ITALIAN

ITALIAN 41N: Imagining Italy

Preference to freshmen. To the English and American literary imagination, Italy has long been a source of fascination. During the past hundred years, writers from Nathaniel Hawthorne to Frances Mayes have explored the broad range of contradictory resonances of the Italian setting, in fiction, travel essays, and memoirs. While some writers have celebrated the sensuality of Italian culture and landscape, others have imagined Italy as a more dangerous place -- as dangerous as the erotic love with which it is often identified. The range of literary responses to Italy by writers in English during the past hundred years will be examined, and the ways in which our culture has continued to construct myths of Italy will be explored. We will also see how these myths have been transformed into commodities in today's consumer culture, making "Italy" one of the most profitable fictions in the marketplace. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ITALIAN 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (FRENCH 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 101: Italy: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Renowned for its rich cultural tradition, Italy is also one of the most problematic nations in Europe. This course explores the contradictions at the heart of Italy, focusing on five key words and their corresponding human figures, which embody the spirit of Italy and its people: Stile (the artist), Spirito (the hero-saint), Scienza (the thinker), Migrazione (the explorer), and Crisi (the political man). Through the study of historical and literary texts, films, and news media, the course addresses figures such as Dante, Michelangelo, Da Vinci, and Galileo; and socio-cultural phenomena such as fashion and design, the scientific revolution, immigration, and Berlusconi. Offered as a part of the Gateways to the World program. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lummus, D. (PI)

ITALIAN 104: La dolce vita: Italian Stereotypes in Film

Passion, nostalgia, mafia, women. What has it meant to be Italian in the past hundred years? How are these stereotypes invented, portrayed and dismantled by filmmakers such as Fellini, Scola, Giordana, Benigni and Torre? This course will address the problem of Italianità, its anomalies and contradictions, and look at how Italians have imagined themselves on the big screen, from the figure of the hopeless romantic to the mafioso. Films will be in Italian with English subtitles. Taught in Italian.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 127: Inventing Italian Literature: Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarca

The origins of Italian literature. Poetry such as 13th-century love lyrics, Dante's Vita Nuova and Petrarca's Canzoniere; prose such as stories from Boccaccio's Decameron. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lummus, D. (PI)

ITALIAN 128: The Italian Renaissance and the Path to Modernity

The literature, art, and history of the Renaissance and beyond. Readings from the 15th through 18th centuries include Moderata Fonte, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso, Galileo, and Goldoni. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent (2 years of Italian)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Springer, C. (PI)

ITALIAN 129: Modern Italian History and Literature

The history of the Italian nation and national literary identity in the 19th and 20th centuries. The relationship between literary texts and their historical context from the Risorgimento to the Resistance. Focus is on the romantic lyric, futurism, fascism, and the changing status of women. Authors include Foscolo, Leopardi, D'Annunzio, Aleramo, Marinetti, Pirandello, Ungaretti, and Montale. Prerequisite: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent. Taught in Italian.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Springer, C. (TA)

ITALIAN 152: Boccaccio's Decameron: The Ethics of Storytelling (ITALIAN 352)

This course involves an in-depth study of Boccaccio's Decameron in the context of medieval theories of poetry and interpretation. The goal is to understand more fully the relationship between literature and lived experience implied by Boccaccio's fictions. We will address key critical issues and theoretical approaches related to the text. Taught in English translation, there will be an optional supplementary Italian discussion section during weeks 2-9.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lummus, D. (PI)

ITALIAN 154: Film & Philosophy (COMPLIT 154A, FRENCH 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

Issues of freedom, morality, faith, knowledge, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Twelve Monkeys (Gilliam), Ordet (Dreyer), The Dark Knight (Nolan), Vicky Cristina Barcelona (Allen), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 155: The Mafia in Society, Film, and Fiction

The mafia has become a global problem through its infiltration of international business, and its model of organized crime has spread all over the world from its origins in Sicily. At the same time, film and fiction remain fascinated by a romantic, heroic vision of the mafia. Compares both Italian and American fantasies of the Mafia to its history and impact on Italian and global culture. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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