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1 - 10 of 46 results for: FINANCE

FINANCE 201: Managerial Finance

This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will discuss many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, capital structure choice, payout policy, the use and valuation of derivative securities, and risk management. This course is targeted to those students who are new to finance and for those with little quantitative background.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 204: Managerial Finance - Accelerated

This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will discuss many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, capital structure choice, the use and valuation of derivative securities (e.g., options and convertible securities), and risk management. This accelerated course is designed for those students who are relatively new to finance but who possess solid quantitative skills.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 211: Corporate Finance: Applications, Techniques, and Models

The focus of this course is to apply the fundamental ideas and tools of corporate finance to real-world corporate decisions. This course (in either its basic or accelerated format) is designed to be the second course in a standard finance sequence; that is, it is designed to be the natural follow-up to the Winter Managerial Finance course. This course will develop and extend standard tools and techniques of financial analysis, valuation, and model-building, and apply these methods to a wide range of cases. Case topics will include capital structure, valuation, mergers and acquisitions, private equity and venture capital, international finance, hostile takeovers and leveraged buyouts, financial distress and bankruptcy. Students will be expected to develop detailed model-based analyses for the cases using the tools and techniques we develop in this course, and to employ their analyses to reach and defend specific recommendations for these cases.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Korteweg, A. (PI)

FINANCE 332: Finance and Society

This interdisciplinary course will discuss the role of the financial system within the broader economy and the interactions between the financial industry and the rest of society. The course will provide an overview of the financial system, cover the basic economic principles essential for understanding the role of finance in the economy, and discuss of policy issues around financial regulation. It seeks to mix students from GSB, Law School, Public Policy, Economics, Political Science, and other departments. Topics to be discussed include: nn* The financial system, from microfinance to global megabanks: how and why finance can benefit society as well as endanger and harm. nn* Financial regulation: why and how? nn* Other people's money: the challenge of effective control, governance, and trust. nn* The politics of banking and finance. nn* Ethical issues in finance.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Admati, A. (PI)

FINANCE 336: The Finance of Retirement and Pensions

The financial economics of how retirement is financed, particularly in the US. Topics: basic finance concepts necessary for understanding individual retirement savings. Properties of financial instruments such as bonds and stocks. Optimization of individual retirement account or 401(k) portfolios. Defined benefit pensions. Measuring defined benefit pension liabilities. Impact of defined benefit pension liabilities on corporate, state, and local budgeting. The economics of national retirement policy including Social Security and government treatment of private retirement savings.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Rauh, J. (PI)

FINANCE 350: Corporate Financial Modeling

The course will take the perspective of a mid-level manager or decision-maker who is responsible for collecting, analyzing, and utilizing financial information in the context of a major transaction. We will integrate theories presented throughout courses in the core, particularly accounting and finance, and take a hands-on approach to understand how the theory is implemented in practice. nnThe focus of the course will be on developing critical financial modeling skills, understanding best practices, and recognizing common pitfalls. Students will work on a series of cases and build models that can be used for earnings and pro-forma financial statement forecasts, valuation, the assessment of financing needs, merger analysis, and LBO evaluation. nnStudents will also gain experience presenting financial models and critically assessing them. By the conclusion of the course, students will develop the skills to construct complex financial models and the logical frameworks to utilize them for various organizational applications. nn[Note: This course is geared toward students relatively new to financial modeling; those with extensive financial modeling backgrounds may be better served by an alternative course.]
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: DeMarzo, P. (PI)

FINANCE 555: Managing Wealth and Private Investing

The Wealth Management and Private Investing course will address issues that relate to the management of personal assets as opposed to institutional investing. It will cover the historical origins and growth of private wealth, investment planning, risk management, inter-generational transfers of wealth, philanthropy and tax planning. Classes will focus on case studies and various readings. Two instructors will lead the class and several classes will be augmented by visits from professionals in the wealth management and private banking industries. Active class participation and a group project are required.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: Parker, G. (PI)

FINANCE 587: Private Equity - An Overview of the Industry

This 2-unit elective at the GSB is an analytical review and overview of private equity partnerships. The course looks at all aspects of private equity investing and may be of interest to five groups of students: (i) students who aspire to be employed in private equity as a career; (ii) students who plan to be employed by operating companies that are owned by private equity firms; (iii) students who may invest in private equity partnerships as a limited partner; (iv) students who find private equity to be an interesting part of the financial community in general (v) students who expect to participate in corporate business development or mergers and acquisitions. The course will meet for nine classes, most for a duration of 90 minutes. One class will be a mock investment review committee presentation as a final project.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

FINANCE 625: Empirical Asset Pricing

This course is an introduction to empirical research in asset pricing. The focus of the nncourse is on the interplay between financial economic theory, econometric method, andnnthat analysis of financial market data. Topics include tests of asset pricing models, return predictability in time-series and cross-section, empirical studies of asset market imperfections, and studies of individual and professional investor behavior. Class discussions will draw on textbooks/monographs and original articles and working papers.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 121: Undergraduate Finance Research and Discussion Seminar

This seminar is designed to provide some experience with research methods and topics in finance, and to assist undergraduates with career interests in financial research, whether academic or not, with preparation for those careers. The seminar meetings are weekly and discussion based, covering a range of issues and methods in financial economics. Students are expected to prepare a 30-minute research presentation once during the quarter.
Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Duffie, D. (PI)
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