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1 - 10 of 357 results for: EDUC

EDUC 100C: EAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education (ASNAMST 100C)

Education and Society Theme (EAST) House seminar. In autumn quarter, faculty and other scholars from around the University discuss the latest issues, debates, and research in the field of Education. In winter quarter, research and practice pertaining to sex, gender, and education are presented by professionals and scholars. In the spring, the seminar revolves around race, ethnicity, and higher education with a particular emphasis on Asian American issues. Through an examination of these topics, students are able to share and develop their varied interests in educational research, policy, and practice.nnNotes: Attendance at first class required. Seminar meets in the EAST House Dining Hall located at 554 Governor's Ave.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 104Q: "Give Me the Child Until He is Seven..." The Early Roots of Human Behavior

A growing body of evidence suggests that the roots of behavior are to be found in early childhood. These early behaviors have a direct effect on the quality of a child's educational experience. The educational experience, in turn, is a principal determinant of many adult outcomes that affect wellbeing. This course will explore how early social forces, psychological influences, and biological systems combine to affect human behavior in early childhood, in the educational experience, and throughout the life course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

EDUC 110: Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools (EDUC 310, SOC 132, SOC 332)

Seminar. Key sociological theories and empirical studies of the links between education and its role in modern society, focusing on frameworks that deal with sources of educational change, the organizational context of schooling, the impact of schooling on social stratification, and the relationships between the educational system and other social institutions such as families, neighborhoods, and the economy.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 112X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 212X, SOC 129X, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212X or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ball, A. (PI)

EDUC 114N: Growing Up Bilingual (CHILATST 14N, CSRE 14N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 115N: How to Learn Mathematics

What is going on in mathematics education in the United States? Why do so many people hate and fear math? What contributes to the high levels of innumeracy in the general population? Why do girls and women opt out of math when they get a chance? In this seminar we will consider seminal research on math learning in K-12 classrooms, including a focus on equity. We will spend time investigating cases of teaching and learning, through watching videos and visiting schools. This seminar is for those who are interested in education, and who would like to learn about ways to help students (and maybe yourselves?) learn and enjoy mathematics. If you have had bad math experiences and would like to understand them ¿ and put them behind you ¿ this seminar will be particularly good for you. The final project for this class will involve developing a case of one or more math learners, investigating their journeys in the world of math.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Boaler, J. (PI)

EDUC 116N: Howard Zinn's 'A People's History' and the Quest for Historical Truth (HISTORY 116N)

Howard Zinn's 'A People's History of the United States' has few peers among contemporary historical works. With more than two million copies in print, A People's History is more than a book. It is a cultural icon, a symbol of our time. "You wanna read a real history book," Matt Damon tells Robin Williams in Good Will Hunting, "read People's History of the US. That book'll knock you on your ass." Today, A People's History's original grey cover has been colorized in red, white, and blue for its Harper "Perennial Modern Classic" edition, and is now marketed with special displays in suburban megastores. You can buy A People's History T-shirts and tote-bags. Zinn's book was not the first but is certainly the defining example of a genre of historical writing known as revisionism, in which the cherished truths of a previous generation are turned on their head. In this seminar, we will use A People's History to probe the question of historical truth. How do we determine what was true in the past? Why and under what circumstances should we believe what historians say? Under what circumstances are we required to rethink our own interpretations about the past, even if doing so causes discomfort and upheaval? A People's History will be our point of departure, but our journey will visit a variety of historical trouble spots: debates about whether the US was founded as a Christian nation, Holocaust denial, and the "Birther" controversy of President Obama.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 11SC: Work and Family

Examination into the forces behind the rise in women's paid work and subsequent changes in the workplace and in families. Topics include gendered division of labor, decisions about marriage and childrearing, economic issues, employers' role in structuring work and family, and public policy issues such as anti-discrimination laws, divorce laws, and subsidized child care.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 120C: Education and Society (EDUC 220C, SOC 130, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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